Green Girl: A Novel

Green Girl: A Novel

by Kate Zambreno
3.1 6

Paperback(Reprint)

$11.11 $14.99 Save 26% Current price is $11.11, Original price is $14.99. You Save 26%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Monday, September 25 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Overview

Green Girl: A Novel by Kate Zambreno

With the fierce emotional and intellectual power of such classics as Jean Rhys's Good Morning, Midnight, Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, and Clarice Lispector's The Hour of the Star, Kate Zambreno's novel Green Girl is a provocative, sharply etched portrait of a young woman navigating the spectrum between anomie and epiphany.

First published in 2011 in a small press edition, Green Girl was named one of the best books of the year by critics including Dennis Cooper and Roxane Gay. In Bookforum, James Greer called it "ambitious in a way few works of fiction are." This summer it is being republished in an all-new Harper Perennial trade paperback, significantly revised by the author, and including an extensive P.S. section including never before published outtakes, an interview with the author, and a new essay by Zambreno.

Zambreno's heroine, Ruth, is a young American in London, kin to Jean Seberg gamines and contemporary celebutantes, by day spritzing perfume at the department store she calls Horrids, by night trying desperately to navigate a world colored by the unwanted gaze of others and the uncertainty of her own self-regard. Ruth, the green girl, joins the canon of young people existing in that important, frightening, and exhilarating period of drift and anxiety between youth and adulthood, and her story is told through the eyes of one of the most surprising and unforgettable narrators in recent fiction—a voice at once distanced and maternal, indulgent yet blackly funny. And the result is a piercing yet humane meditation on alienation, consumerism, the city, self-awareness, and desire, by a novelist who has been compared with Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, and Elfriede Jelinek.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062322838
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 06/24/2014
Series: P.S.
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 259,980
Product dimensions: 5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.68(d)

About the Author

Kate Zambreno is also the author of the novel Green Girl (reissued by Harper Perennial) and a work of experimental criticism, Heroines (published by Semiotext(e)'s Active Agents). She is at work on a series of books about time, memory, and the persistence of art, including Book of Mutter (forthcoming from Semiotext(e)'s Native Agents in March 2017) and Drifts (forthcoming from Harper Perennial in late 2017). She teaches in the writing programs at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Green Girl 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Scott_Kennedy More than 1 year ago
A devasting prose-poem on the lack of identity that can infect one's early 20s. I loved it. Worth reading for the narrative voice alone. Also, I should mention that I had no intention of actually reading this book when I did. But glancing at the first few pages sucked me right in and then I couldn't stop. This is not a book to read for plot; it has little. But it captures and evokes an experience perfectly. As a reader in my 40s, this is a book to savor, remembering what it was like to be so unformed, and to make me damned glad I'm not 20 anymore. I could go on about other terrific qualitities of the book and the way it reflects our current society, etc., but really, you'd be better off reading it yourself (it's short) and forming your own opinion. Highly recommended. If I had to make a trite movie pitch for the book, I'd say think of it as Bridget Jones's Diary for pessimists or Catcher in the Rye for the Jersey Shore generation, a story wherein our heroine is inarticulate and essentially vapid, but entrancing, troubling and moving nonetheless.
Matilda-was-taken More than 1 year ago
Beautifully written. Unapologetic female characters. The sinking lost years. The woman on display. The woman inside. Proof you don't need to love a character or her choices to enjoy a good book. If you seek something different. New.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Of the blurb constant comparing to unread authors when the review is so confused what can we expect? Waste more time on a smple have never read the author and disliked the bell jar twenty years ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When it revuews as a mish mosh and that is correct spelling not mash sample or borrow saves time and archive