Greenmantle (unabridged)

Greenmantle (unabridged)

by John Buchan

Paperback

$19.66 View All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Greenmantle is the second of John Buchan's novels to feature Richard Hannay, a Scottish intelligence office in the British army, and as such is the sequel to The Thirty-Nine Steps.

The book gives the account of Hannay and his associate's separate journeys through war-torn Europe to Constantinople to thwart an uprising that is poised to throw the Middle East, India, and North Africa into disarray, changing the course of the war.

The book was popular when first published and although it has never been made into a film, the director Alfred Hitchcock was said to prefer Greenmantle to The Thirty-Nine Steps, and considered filming it on several occasions.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780368560637
Publisher: Blurb, Inc.
Publication date: 04/07/2019
Pages: 262
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.55(d)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Greenmantle 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Patarma6 More than 1 year ago
The slightly stylized grammar and sentence structure is fun and an interesting perspective of the writing of the period. Almost 100 years old but still a a good read. The Victorian/Edwardian setting is conveyed with subtly.
Lisa Talbott More than 1 year ago
Fantastic, easy to read WWI spy adventure... but this version has some pretty serious issues. At times so many letters are incorrect you almost feel you are reading in code. Also a few unreadable scanned pages. Go ahead and pay the $1 or $2 for a clean version.
glauver More than 1 year ago
Greenmantle was the second of John Buchan's Richard Hannay adventures. Although Hannay is often lumped into spy fiction, the story is more adventure than espionage. Buchan wrote this novel only a few months after the events that frame it took place. The cynicism that has enveloped most spy fiction since the 60s is lacking. Hannay and his band of adventurers risk their necks cheerfully, thinking of God and England. There is more character development than in The Thirty-nine Steps, the first story of the series. The plot still has holes and the characters seem to meet each other by coincidence just when it matters. However, the story has historical and literary value because it was written while WWI was still raging. What is especially noteworthy is Buchan's ability to rise above the anti-German propaganda of the time and even give the Kaiser a favorable cameo. The Muslim elements of the plot seem eerily 21st century a hundred years later.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Scary how prescient Buchan could be - what will happen if the Muslim world rises against the West. Set in Turkey after Gallipoli, and the West's greatest allies are the Russians.
jeffome on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Overall, an OK yarn, but the geographic and political detail prevalent through out this tale revealed the fact that i apparently know absolutely nothing about the global relationships defining WWI!!! Now, that would be my fault; but holy cow, the name-dropping of people, places, historic relationships from Britain, throughout Africa, Eastern Europe, Western Europe and the Middle East was a bit overwhelming....much of it without any explanation...merely an assumption that the reader would know exactly what was being discussed. Also, along the line of Buchan's "The 39 Steps," the string of lucky coincidences that allows this small band of spies to accomplish the impossible gets a little hard to swallow after awhile. With that said, there were some sections of exciting adventure that made it worthwhile....and maybe it has embarrassed me enough to do a little boning up on my early 20th century world history!
findantonia on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Buchan had a fascinating career before his early death. Always a prolific writer, who worked In publishing at first, he authored a history of the WW1 at its inception, then worked in intelligence during the war, eventually becoming Director of Intelligence at the new British Ministry of Information. When the war ended he rewrote the background history, incorporating it into a four volume History of the Great War. He was friends with both Aubrey Herbert and T.E. Lawrence, and a composite of the two is thought to be the basis of one character in this 1916 work. A ideal background for a writer of WW1 spy stories, surely. I was fascinated by the detailed discussion of late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century Middle East power gaming and politics, and views of the geared-up WW1 German War Machine, particularly given the relevance of that local history and culture to today's wars and volatile areas. Not having read up on WW1 south of the Med during school or come across useful background in other fiction, the issue of control of the Middle East as a key, possibly critical tipping point in WW1 now appears to have be unhelpfully ignored except among war history buffs.Unfortunately warning is needed that it is occasionally tainted by the contemporary attitudes to indigenous African populations, which arise largely through the odd colloquialism and the fallout of fallout of main character Hannay's background of living in South Africa with the Boer. If, as with Shakespeare or other writers of previous centuries, it is possible to wince through those now-unacceptable contemporary attitudes, the book is rather interesting and worth reading, though lacking the flow of The 29 Steps, I thought. It is again a very episodic work and I regretted that the characters are dispersed for so much of it. I'm still processing my reaction but on balance I found it an interesting rather than satisfying read, so, together with the bigotry issue which really got my hackles up, I'm tending to a harsh rating. I'm hanging on to the book though.
bcquinnsmom on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I don't believe this was the case with this novel, but I can definitely visualize it as a serialization back in its day, with lots of cliffhangers and people fidgeting in their seats waiting for the next installment. Once it gets started, the action just doesn't let up, and I can remember thinking, okay, Richard Hannay has a couple of more adventures in store by this author so he has to come out okay. It's one of those books where you find yourself inwardly rooting for the good guys, and where you are also inwardly waiting for the bad guys to get theirs. Greenmantle follows Buchan's "Thirty-nine Steps" not as a sequel so much (imho), but rather as something along the line of the further adventures of Richard Hannay, the main protagonist and overall hero of the Thirty-nine Steps. Hannay has since been a soldier in WWI, in which he was injured at Loos. Now he is called into action once again, this time by the Foreign Office. Sir Walter Bullivant, the senior man at the FO, explains to Hannay that there is a German plot to drag Turkey into the war. The problem is not so much Turkey, per se, but all of the provinces where Islam is very strong; and the rumor is that Germany has something to bring all of the provincial Muslims together to fan the flames against the allies under German auspices. Just what Germany has is the unknown factor, and it's up to Hannay to figure it out. He is given only one clue: a half-piece of paper with the words "Kasredin", "cancer," and "v.I." It is from here that an incredible adventure begins which will keep the reader pretty much glued to the book.Phenomenal read, and I recommend it highly. Yes, there are some improbable spots in the novel, but hey...it's an adventure and it's fun. The characters are great, and as noted at the beginning, you'll be wondering after a while how the good guys are ever going to get out of each predicament in which they find themselves. Also...consider the subject matter. This book was written in 1916, but in some ways is quite relevant to the world's situation today.I can't recommend this one highly enough; those who like older stories of espionage and spycraft will really enjoy it. Others who may enjoy it are those who like good old-fashioned stories of adventure; and those who read The Thirty-Nine Steps by the same author may wish to read it to find out what happens next to Richard Hannay. Very well done.
yogipoet on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i loved this book. must have read it a few times. hope you enjoy it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She walked in with confedence on her face and a sort of swagger in her step. She had long black hair down to her waist, green eyes, and was 5ft 7in. She wore a faded rock and roll t-shirt, ripped jeans, and dirty nike running shoes. She looked around and thought she was going to like it here.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sure
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heyyyy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yes you are what I am looking for •_•
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HERE. ~ Leader, Daniel<p>
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago