Guardians of the West (Malloreon Series #1)

Guardians of the West (Malloreon Series #1)

by David Eddings

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

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Overview

Here, in the eagerly awaited sequel to David Eddings’ bestselling The Belgariad, is the first book of The Malloreon, an epic quest across strange lands and among stranger peoples—a magnificent fantasy of men, Kings, Sorcerers, and Gods caught up in the culmination of the seven-thousand-year war between two opposing Destinies to determine the fate of all creation.

Garion had slain the evil God Torak and been crowned King of Riva. The Prophecy was fulfilled—or so it seemed. While the strange child Erand was growing up in the Vale of Aldur with Plgara and Durnik, showing only occasional flashes of inexplicable knowledge and power, Garion was learning to rule and to be the husband of his fiery little Queen Ce’Nedra. Eleven years passed.

Then suddenly the Voice of Prophecy cried out a warning: “Beware Zandramas!” Not even Belgarath the Sorcerer knew who or what Zandramas was. But Garion discovered hints in a previously obscured part of the Mrin Codex. Worse, he learned that the Dark Prophecy was still waging its ancient struggle against the Prophecy of Light. Again, a great evil was brewing in the East. And again, Garion found himself a pawn, caught between the two ancient Prophecies, with the fate of the world somehow resting on him.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345352668
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/12/1988
Series: Malloreon Series , #1
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 139,046
Product dimensions: 4.24(w) x 6.90(h) x 1.14(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

David Eddings (1931-2009) published his first novel, High Hunt, in 1973, before turning to the field of fantasy with the Belgariad, soon followed by the Malloreon. Born in Spokane, Washington, and raised in the Puget Sound area north of Seattle, he received his bachelor of arts degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon in 1954, and a master of arts degree from the University of Washington in 1961. He served in the US Army, worked as a buyer for the Boeing Company, and was both a grocery clerk and a college English teacher. He lived in Nevada until his death, at the age of 77.

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Guardians of the West 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
mpritchett on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Mallorean series starts where the Belgariad series left off. On a surprising note, this series starts with a few mysteries that need to be solved along with the misdirection that every good mystery has. In this first book, we spend a lot of time exploring the character and mystery that is Errand. And although nothing is every fully revealed, we are getting tidbits of information that lead us to want to know more. Of course with the mysteries comes some court intrigue that end up with a few kingdom wars. Overall a more satisfying start to a series than I found in the first novel of the Belgariad.
JechtShot on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
All of your favorite characters from the Belgariad are back in Eddings follow-on series the Malloreon. Once again, Belgarion is pitted against two prophecies regarding the Child of Light and the Child of Dark and this time he must act to save humanity and his newborn son.Eddings brings back and expands upon the characters first introduced in the Belgariad. The most interesting transformation of character is that of Errand. The somewhat intriguing boy from the previous series is found to have sorcerer-like powers allowing him to see into the minds of others across great distances. Magic of this nature is unknown to the likes of Polgara and Belgarath and is sure to be an essential element to future books in the series.For fans of The Belgariad, Guardians of the West is a must read.
Karlstar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was just a good as start to a new series as was Pawn of Prophecy. Some of the same characters are back, Garion, Belgarath, Polgara, but with some new ones.
TadAD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the problems with an author deciding to cash in on a successful series by extending it is that it generally feels like it was bolted on after the fact rather than an organic whole with the story that went before. I'm going to give Eddings the benefit of the doubt and assume that this was an after-the-fact extension rather than his initial story plan—'cause otherwise I'd have an even lower opinion of this quintology. The problem with The Mallorean is that it's basically the same story as The Belgariad with different details. One cannot escape the feeling of déjà vu while reading it. In fact, even the characters feel it and offer some lame rationale that it's some cycle of destiny.The Belgariad ends at a perfectly good spot. Just quit there.
Anagarika-Sean on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I remember reading this series, but I don't remember how good it was. So, I give it three stars.
willowcove on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This entire series is wonderful. One of the earlier "young boy discovers that he's more than he was led to believe" stories. A classic in the fantasy genre that pulls you into a great read.
iftyzaidi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
David Eddings was really a seminal author for me back when I was a wee lad. Along with Terry Brooks, Raymond Feist, the team of Margret Weis and Tracy Hickman and of course Tolkein, his books helped to get me hooked on fantasy fiction. Somewhere along the line, like several of the other authors mentioned, Eddings lost me. Once too many times it felt as if his latest fantasy series was all too similar to the previous one. Of his early books though, the series that I never got round to reading was the Mallorean quintet, of which this is the first book. The series is a direct continuation of the Belgariad quintet.Its a fair enough start to the series. Very little happens in the first half of the book - 200 pages of weddings, funerals, home-making and general puttering around by the characters from the Belgariad. People who loved the original characters will probably enjoy this, while others may start getting impatient and wondering when something is going to happen. Luckily Eddings' sense of humour and easy-to-read prose doesn't make this a complete chore to read. In the second half of the book the wheels of the plot start of painstakingly grind into action. There's a prophecy (another one!) which promises dire things and some sneaky people are running around causing trouble in the various Kingdoms of the west, culminating with the kidnapping of the infant son of Garion (the farm-boy-to-magic-wielding-lost-king of the Belgariad). The book ends with the quest to find and retrieve the boy getting under way.Its all very by-the-numbers fantasy. But it is made tolerable by the aforementioned humour and the rich cast of characters accumulated over the first series.
Anagarika on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I remember reading this series, but I don't remember how good it was. So, it gets three stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read !!!
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