Half Broken Things

Half Broken Things

by Morag Joss
3.4 23

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Overview

Half Broken Things by Morag Joss

A gripping tale of psychological suspense perfect for the readership of Minette Walters and Ruth Rendell, Half Broken Things is a novel that peers into the lives of three dangerously lost people…and the ominous haven they find when they find each other.

Jean is a house sitter at the end of a dreary career. Steph is nine months pregnant and on the run. And Michael is a thief. Through a mixture of deceit, good luck, and misfortune, these three damaged loners have come together at a secluded country home called Walden Manor. Now all three have found what they needed most: a new beginning, a little kindness, a little love. Living off the manor’s riches, tending its grounds and gardens, they leave the outside world far behind and build a happiness so long denied them. That is, until the first unexpected visitor arrives...igniting a chain reaction that is at once spellbinding and disastrous.

A stunning, thought-provoking crime novel of chilling moral complexity, Half Broken Things is a gripping, haunting exploration of love and our need for it, of the damage done when we go long without it, and the deeds we might be driven to in its name.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780750520980
Publisher: Magna Large Print Books
Publication date: 12/28/2003
Series: Magna Large Print Ser.
Pages: 496

About the Author

Morag Joss grew up on the west coast of Scotland. Her first Sara Selkirk novel, Funeral Music, was nominated by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association for the Dilys Award for the year’s favorite mystery. Her fourth novel, Half Broken Things, won the 2003 CWA Silver Dagger Award. Morag Joss lives in the country outside the city of Bath and in London.

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Half Broken Things 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
S_E More than 1 year ago
As I read this book, I became more and more nervous about what would happen to the characters. This is a book that you know from the onset will not have a happy ending. The broken pieces of the characters could remind you of how easy it is to create another reality. The writing is quite good. The author describes history and love in a unique manner and gives the words a new voice.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why yes! There is a movie. This book led me to read Everything else Joss has written. It is the receipient of one of England's Dagger awards. Now do your homework And look up other books granted this honor, You will be glad you did! Happy Reading
Judith1 More than 1 year ago
Had to put this down. The title character's decisions in this book just don't make sense. She knows she is headed for trouble and yet goes forward with her charade as the owner of the house she is sitting. The reader is waiting for the shoe to drop at all times. Not even in a suspenseful way but in a feeling of dread. I found this book dreary and sad. When she posts for a made up son, you really can't believe someone would really do something so ridiculous. Not an interesting book, would not give it away. Reads flat!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Despite their weak character traits and actions that range from mildly careless to downright horrific, Morag Joss is amazingly successful in making the three main characters of this story--Jean, Michael, and Steph--sympathetic to the reader. Each of them comes to Walden Manor with some baggage, a history of being or at least feeling unloved and unwanted, and that past shapes their behaviors, sending them down a dangerous path of destruction in their desperate desire to hold onto the Eden they have created for themselves. Each have long-established coping mechanisms to shut out the reality that is bubbling below the surface, but there will come a point when it can no longer be ignored. An excellent story that builds suspense.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Town and Country Sitters sent the letter to subcontracted house sitter Jean that after she completes the current nine-month assignment at Bath¿s Walden Manor, she will receive no further work because she will have turned sixty-five and cannot obtain insurance. Melancholy, Jean has lived alone even as an adopted child as her new parents never showered her with love. Over the years she made up imaginary relatives like her niece Jenny who cared what happens to her.................... In Walden Manor, Jean accidentally shatters a teapot containing a set of keys that enable the lonely woman to open the upstairs lock rooms and her imagination as a resident of Walden Manor. She creates a grown son that years before she was forced to give up for adoption and advertises in a magazine pleading for his return. Con artist Michael responds accompanied by a pregnant woman, Steph, whom he just met as she flees from her abusive boyfriend. The trio forges a happy home though the end state countdown begins when Steph¿s baby is born but inexplicably dies and a country curate who is visiting recognizes Michael as a thief.................... Even without Sara Selkirk appearing, Morag Joss is a brilliant virtuoso playing a dark concerto that grips the audience as few novels can. The lead trio is damaged goods that society ignores each finds solace in the loving family unit they form together leading to the audience to wonder how far any one of them or as a ¿mob¿ will go to protect what they now believe is theirs. Though British, fans of deep family dramas will appreciate this gritty thriller that recolor ¿values¿ from red to blue.................... Harriet Klausner
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too much detail
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It just goes on, and on, and on, all the while pretentiously making itself out as cheeky and clever. It isn't.
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ladyhawke28 More than 1 year ago
The story is definitely unique and I find myself thinking that an entertaining movie might be able to be made from this. This was the first book I have read from this author but I found it difficult to stay interested. The writing style bored me and almost from the beginning I just had a feeling of dread. After I would quit reading for the day or night I just felt a bit depressed rather than being anxious to pick the book up again, but I got through it. I believe the author wanted one to be sympathetic to the main characters, but I actually couldn't stand them. The decisions the characters make in the book seem so unrealistic and so irresponsible, I found myself frustrated. Maybe in that way the author does a good job because they do get some kind emotion out of you whether it is bad or good. This book was not right for me but others may just love it.
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KKR More than 1 year ago
A house sitter who has never had a family is informed that now she won't be house-sitting, either. She is turning 65, and has only a future in a boarding house to look forward to until death. Having nothing to lose makes her reckless and indifferent to rules and ethics. She becomes a quiet revolutionary in the class struggle, and takes over all the rooms of the big house she is sitting, the mistress's clothes as well as its wine cellar and its freezer full of meat. When she gets a chance to pretend to be the mother of a stray thief who has a pregnant hanger-on, both always as unloved and poor as she, she takes it, and they become an odd family. Even though the ending has its logic, fascist though it is on the house-sitter's part, I wasn't quite ready for it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Half Broken Things was the first book by Morag Joss I've read, but I look forward to reading her other works. Like Rendell, Joss creates seemingly regular people with their own special problems and sets them in a relatively comfortable and safe evnironment, but it all slowly goes terribly wrong. However, since we the readers have come to relate to her characters, we want to overlook their malevolence, thus the psychological quandry. A good read.