Halloween Carnival Volume 3

Halloween Carnival Volume 3

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Overview

Halloween Carnival Volume 3 by Kelley Armstrong, Kate Maruyama, Michael McBride, Taylor Grant

Kelley Armstrong, Kate Maruyama, Michael McBride, Taylor Grant, and Greg Chapman unleash the unsettled spirits of the past in five frightening stories collected by celebrated editor, author, and horror guru Brian James Freeman.

THE WAY LOST by Kelley Armstrong
The kids in Franklin don’t ask questions. Each Halloween, one of them disappears into the forest. Dale promised his mother he’d never go into the woods alone. But the kids in Franklin also lie.

LA CALAVERA by Kate Maruyama
The Día de los Muertos Festival at the Hollywood Cemetery used to be ours. Now, without Jasmine, it’s only right that I go one last time in her honor—before I let her go for good. . . .

THE DEVIL’S DUE by Michael McBride
Pine Springs, Colorado, has prospered for generations by honoring its traditions and its promises. Then one man refuses to do his civic duty—and the price he must pay is fatally steep.

A THOUSAND ROOMS OF DARKNESS by Taylor Grant
Samhainophobia: an irrational fear of Halloween. Phasmophobia: an irrational fear of ghosts. For Anne, these terrors are more rational than she knows.

THE LAST NIGHT OF OCTOBER by Greg Chapman
Every year, one little boy wearing a grotesque Frankenstein mask comes knocking at Gerald’s door. Gerald has always managed to avoid him . . . until this year.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780399182051
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/17/2017
Series: Halloween Carnival , #3
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 156
Sales rank: 102,579
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Brian James Freeman is the general manager of Cemetery Dance Publications and the author of The Echo of Memory, The Suicide Diary, The Halloween Children (with Norman Prentiss), The Painted Darkness, and Blue November Storms. He has edited several anthologies including Detours, Reading Stephen King, and Halloween Carnival, and with Richard Chizmar he co-edited Killer Crimes and the Dark Screams series. He is also the founder of Books to Benefit, a specialty press that works with bestselling authors to publish collectible limited-edition books to raise funds and awareness for good causes.

Read an Excerpt

The Way Lost

Kelley Armstrong

Every Halloween, one child in Franklin lost his way and never came home. The next morning before school, we would circle the playground, trying to figure out who was missing, locating our friends with relief . . . and our enemies with disappointment. The bell would ring, and we’d file into class, and if every seat in the room was full, we’d nod, as if satisfied, but deep down we felt cheated of the excitement that came with a missing classmate.

If the empty desk was in our room, the teacher would start the lesson with “June is no longer with us. If anyone would prefer her seat, please move there after lunch. You may clear out her belongings at recess.” Come recess, we’d bicker over who got June’s fancy fountain pen or dog-eared copy of Charlotte’s Web. Quiet bickering—anything louder disrespected the dead.

Not that we knew June was dead. No one ever said that. No funeral would be held. No new grave would appear in our town cemetery. Even her family would continue on as if nothing had happened. As if she’d simply grown up, moved away, and didn’t care to return.

But we kids knew that June was dead. We just knew.

We also knew that we weren’t supposed to ask questions. I don’t know how many stuck to that in the privacy of their homes. I did, mostly, but now and then I couldn’t help bringing it up. The first time I remember doing so was when I was nine, after Billy Carson disappeared.

I’d known Billy. Didn’t like him much. He’d lived next door and used to torment our dog by sticking food through the fence and then yanking it back, laughing when Scamp smacked into the wood.

But Billy was still the first kid I actually knew who disappeared on Halloween, and so naturally I asked my mother what happened to him. We were in the kitchen. I sat on the stool by the counter and watched her chop carrots for soup, and I asked about Billy Carson.

“He lost his way,” she said, still chopping.

“How?”

She shrugged. “He just did. It happens.”

Three years later, after Sue Parker disappeared, I was back on that same stool, my sneakers knocking against the wood as my mother rolled dough for pie.

“I liked Sue,” I said.

She kept rolling. Five minutes had passed before I said it again: “I liked Sue.”

“I know.”

“She was pretty.”

“She was.”

“And nice.”

“Yes.”

“But she lost her way?”

My mother took flour from the bag and sprinkled it. “She did.”

“Last night, when I was trick-or-treating, I thought I saw her.”

My mother stopped, her hand poised over the floured counter.

“She was cutting through the forest,” I said. “Is that where it happens? In the forest?”

She reached for the dough. “Yes.”

“So if I avoid the forest on Halloween, I won’t lose my way?”

“Yes. You should avoid the forest on Halloween.” She set the dough down, hesitated, and then lifted her gaze to mine. “Please.”

I said I would.

I lied.

Customer Reviews

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Halloween Carnival Volume 3 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
BuckeyeAngel More than 1 year ago
This was a collection of stories by various authors all taking place at Halloween. The stories vary in nature. They also vary in the audience they are serving and in the quality of the story. Some of them I liked and some of them I didn’t. **I voluntarily read and reviewed this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the third in a series of short story collections to be released in October this year. I previously read the first two entries in the series and this was very much on par with those. This was of a pretty consistent quality throughout but I didn't feel there was a standout story this time around. The Way Lost starts out this collection. Not the most original story in the world but enjoyable and quick moving. The second story, La Calavera changes up the tone and is more focused on Mexican culture. Another solid story and some nice imagery. The Devil's Due was a nice tale about the secret and isolated community hides. Reminded me a lot of Hex in the setup though the execution is very different. A Thousand Rooms Of Darkness is more of a psychological horror story about the trauma a woman has experienced on Halloween and how it has affected her life. Falters a little bit at the end but my favorite story of this collection. Closing out the collection is The Last Night Of October, a longer story about a secret hidden for most of a lifetime. It felt a little too long to me but once it got going it was a solid story. Overall this was a little bit of step down from the previous entries but definitely worth reading, especially if you enjoyed the other entries. I'd order the stories in this order from favorite to least favorite: A Thousand Rooms Of Darkness The Devil's Due La Calavera The Last Night Of October The Way Lost I received an advance copy of this title for review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the third in a series of short story collections to be released in October this year. I previously read the first two entries in the series and this was very much on par with those. This was of a pretty consistent quality throughout but I didn't feel there was a standout story this time around. The Way Lost starts out this collection. Not the most original story in the world but enjoyable and quick moving. The second story, La Calavera changes up the tone and is more focused on Mexican culture. Another solid story and some nice imagery. The Devil's Due was a nice tale about the secret and isolated community hides. Reminded me a lot of Hex in the setup though the execution is very different. A Thousand Rooms Of Darkness is more of a psychological horror story about the trauma a woman has experienced on Halloween and how it has affected her life. Falters a little bit at the end but my favorite story of this collection. Closing out the collection is The Last Night Of October, a longer story about a secret hidden for most of a lifetime. It felt a little too long to me but once it got going it was a solid story. Overall this was a little bit of step down from the previous entries but definitely worth reading, especially if you enjoyed the other entries. I'd order the stories in this order from favorite to least favorite: A Thousand Rooms Of Darkness The Devil's Due La Calavera The Last Night Of October The Way Lost I received an advance copy of this title for review.
dezzy33 More than 1 year ago
This is the third in a series of five Halloween Carnivals. Like the others, the anthology features 5 different authors and are centered on Halloween. This one is my favorite thus far. Four of the five were about people dreading Halloween, which I found interesting. We have a story about the fear of ghosts and Halloween (Grant's A Thousand Rooms of Darkness); a cautionary tale about letting trick-or-treaters in when you have a questionable past (Chapman's The Last Night of October); a yarn on how to be a good dad when you live in a town with horrible secrets due to your own nasty forefathers (McBride's The Devil's Due); and a predictable but gruesome recounting of a Día de los Muertos Festival and one woman who has a hard time abandoning both her Halloween plans and her old friend. Once again, my favorite is the first in the book. The Way Lost by Kelley Armstrong begins: "Every Halloween, one child in Franklin lost his way and never came home." First Billy Carson, the annoying next-door neighbor who teased the dog. Then Sue Parker, the pretty girl who attended the same church as our protagonist. Then Richie Gibson, the sad little boy whose mother died. Our protagonist is convinced that one day, the police will come to him to learn Franklin's secrets as he was someone who saw what lived in the woods and escaped... And unfortunately, they do...