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Handbook of Developmental Psychopathology
     

Handbook of Developmental Psychopathology

by Michael Lewis PhD (Editor), Suzanne M. Miller (Editor)
 

Developmental psychopathology is the new child on the block. As yet not an overly sturdy child, but one clearly out of the cradle, an active toddler and an enterprising explorer of the boundaries of its province. It wasn't always so. Only 15 years ago Thomas Achenbach in publishing the first edition of his book used a recently coined title, Developmental

Overview

Developmental psychopathology is the new child on the block. As yet not an overly sturdy child, but one clearly out of the cradle, an active toddler and an enterprising explorer of the boundaries of its province. It wasn't always so. Only 15 years ago Thomas Achenbach in publishing the first edition of his book used a recently coined title, Developmental Psychopathology, and began the volume with a provoking first sentence: "This is a book about a field that hardly exists yet. " Seven years later when the second edition appeared, that sentence had been deleted. In place of the original 13-page chapter, on the "Developmental Approach to Psychopathology in Chil­ dren," there was a 40-page chapter focused on the biological, cognitive, social-emotional, and educational perspectives in development, together with a lengthy account of develop­ mental periods and an integrative statement on the constituents of a developmental framework. Other signs and symptoms began to appear. Child Development, a doyen for develop­ mentalists, devoted a special issue, under the guest editorship of Dante Cicchetti, to an emergent developmental psychopathology. This year saw the publication of a new journal, Development and Psychopathology (1989), edited by Cicchetti and Nurcombe. And attend­ ees at recent meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development can attest to the growing interest of the membership in the linkage of development and psychopathology as seen and heard via posters, symposia, and guest speakers.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Provides an overview of the constructs, models, challenges, and cultural factors that are central to predicting the development of maladaptive behaviors and processes. Investigates the impact of developmental influences on clinical disorders in childhood and explores their links with normal behavior. Addresses such clinical entities as disruptive disorders, anxiety-related conditions, and depression, examining their nature, origins, and evolution. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306431906
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
01/28/1990
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
529

Meet the Author

Michael Lewis, Ph.D., is University Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry and Director of the Institute for the Study of Child Development at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He is also Professor of Psychology, Education, and Biomedical Engineering, and currently serves as Founding Director of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School’s Autism Center. He has been the recipient of the Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contribution to Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society from the American Psychological Association, the Hedi Levenback Pioneer Award from The New York Zero-to-Three Network, and the award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Child Development from the Society for Research in Child Development.He is also the author of Shame: The Exposed Self, Altering Fate: Why the Past Does Not Predict the Future, and the soon to be published The Rise of Consciousness and the Development of Emotional Life.

Karen D. Rudolph, Ph.D., is a Professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed a clinical internship at the Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital at UCLA. She has been a recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Faculty Scholars Award, a James McKeen Cattell Sabbatical Award, and has served as a PI and Co-PI on several large-scale longitudinal studies funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. She serves on the editorial boards of Development and Psychopathology and the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology and is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Her research focuses on person-by-environment interactions that predict the emergence and continuity of depressive disorders, with a focus on developmental transitions (e.g., puberty, school transitions) that create a context of risk for the onset or exacerbation of psychopathology.

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