Handbook of ECT

Handbook of ECT

Other Format(Spiral Bound - SPIRAL)

$33.46 $39.50 Save 15% Current price is $33.46, Original price is $39.5. You Save 15%.

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Handbook of ECT by Charles H. Kellner, John T. Pritchett, Mark D. Beale, C. Edward Coffey

Written by leading experts in the field of electroconvulsive therapy, the Handbook of ECT is a handy, quick reference for experienced practitioners and a guidebook for residents who are learning this procedure. The authors provide a concise overview of all aspects of ECT delivery, including patient selection, treatment techniques, and patient aftercare. The Handbook will enable clinicians to perform ECT according to the most up-to-date standards in the field.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780880486835
Publisher: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
Publication date: 08/01/1997
Edition description: SPIRAL
Pages: 122
Product dimensions: 5.52(w) x 8.16(h) x 0.42(d)

About the Author

Charles H. Kellner, M.D., is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Professor in the Department of Neurology, at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

John T. Pritchett, M.D., is is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

Mark D. Beale, M.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

C. Edward Coffey, M.D., is Vice President of Behavioral Services and Chairman and Kathleen and Earl Ward Chair of Psychiatry in the Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Handbook of ECT 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Without a doubt, Kellner makes a good case for ECTs. However, his book lacks personal accounts of his finances with certain companies. Kellner continually finds studies "inconclusive" when involving his occupation. I am interested in the ratio of both contries and hospitals who agree to ECTs verses those who deem ECTs inhuman.