The Handbook of Language and Globalization / Edition 1

The Handbook of Language and Globalization / Edition 1

by Nikolas Coupland
ISBN-10:
1405175818
ISBN-13:
9781405175814
Pub. Date:
09/07/2010
Publisher:
Wiley

Hardcover

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Overview

The Handbook of Language and Globalization / Edition 1

The Handbook of Language and Globalization brings together important new studies of language and discourse in the global era, consolidating a vibrant new field of sociolinguistic research.

  • The first volume to assemble leading scholarship in this rapidly developing field

  • Features new contributions from 36 internationally-known scholars,  bringing together key research in the field and establishing a benchmark for future research

  • Comprehensive coverage divided into four sections: global multilingualism, world languages and language systems; global discourse in key domains and genres; language, values and markets under globalization; and language, distance and identities

  • Covers an impressive breadth of topics including tourism, language teaching, social networking, terrorism, and religion, among many others

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781405175814
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 09/07/2010
Series: Blackwell Handbooks in Linguistics Series , #53
Pages: 676
Product dimensions: 7.10(w) x 9.60(h) x 1.80(d)

About the Author

Nikolas Coupland is Research Director, Centre for Language and Communication Research, Cardiff University. He is an elected member of the UK Academy of Social Sciences. He is co-editor of the book series, Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics. Coupland was also founding editor, with Allan Bell, of the Journal of Sociolinguistics.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Sociolinguistics in the global era (Nikolas Coupland).

Part 1: Global multilingualism, world languages and language systems.

1. Globalization, global English, and world English(es): Myths and facts (Salikoko Mufwene, University of Chicago).

2. Global language systems (Abram de Swaan, University of Amsterdam).

3. The global politics of language: Markets, maintenance, marginalisation or murder? (Tove Skutnabb-Kangas and Robert Phillipson).

4. World languages: Trends and futures (Ulrich Ammon, University of Duisberg-Essen).

5. Language policy and globalization (Thomas Ricento, University of Calgary).

6. Panlingual globalization (Jonathan Pool, Utilika Foundation and University of Washington Turing Center).

7. The spread of global Spanish: From Cervantes to reggaetón (Clare Mar-Molinero, University of Southampton).

8. New national languages in Eastern Europe (Brigitta Busch, University of Vienna).

Part 2: Global discourse in key domains and genres.

9. Localising the global on the participatory Web (Jannis Androutsopoulos, University of Hamburg).

10. Globalizing the local: The case of an Egyptian superhero comic (Theo van Leeuwen, Cardiff University and Usama Suleiman).

11. Language and the globalizing habitus of tourism: Towards a sociolinguistics of fleeting relationships (Adam Jaworski, Cardiff University and Crispin Thurlow, University of Washington).

12. Globalization and language teaching (David Block, University of London).

13. Discursive constructions of global war and terror (Adam Hodges, University of Colorado).

14. Has God gone global? Religion, language and globalisation (Annabelle Mooney, Roehampton University).

Part 3: Language, values and markets under globalization.

15. Language as resource in the globalized new economy (Monica Heller, University of Toronto).

16. Language and movement in space (Jan Blommaert, University of Jyväskylä and Tilburg University and Jie Dong, Tilburg University).

17. Indexing the local (Barbara Johnstone, Carnegie Mellon University).

18. Ecolinguistics and globalization (Arran Stibbe, University of Gloucestershire).

19. The Chinese discourse of human rights and glocalization (Shi-xu, Zhejiang University).

20. Meanings of 'globalization' – east and west (Peter Garrett, Cardiff University).

21. Languages and global marketing (Helen Kelly-Holmes, University of Limerick).

Part 4: Language, distance and identities.

22. Shadows of discourse: Intercultural communication in global contexts (Claire Kramsch, University of California, Berkeley and Elizabeth Boner, University of California, Berkeley).

23. Unraveling post-colonial identity through language (Rakesh M. Bhatt, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign).

24. At the intersection of gender, language and transnationalism (Ingrid Piller, Macquarie University and Kimie Takahashi, Macquarie University).

25. Globalization and gay language (William Leap, American University).

26. Metroethnicities and metrolanguages (John C. Maher).

27. Popular cultures, popular languages and global identities (Alastair Pennycook, University of Technology, Sydney).

28. Global representations of distant suffering (Lilie Chouliaraki, London School of Economics).

29. Global media and the regime of lifestyle (David Machin, Cardiff University and Theo van Leeuwen, Cardiff University).

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

An enlightening and engaging collection byeminent international scholars. A major resource for the study oftheoretical and pragmatic approaches to Global English, includingconcerns about ‘marginalization’ and‘murder’ of languages.” Braj B.Kachru,Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois

“This Handbook provides a fascinating exposition of thecomplex, multidimensional nature of globalization as it pertains tothe world's languages. Coupland has marshalled authors at theforefront of their fields who offer a diversity of approaches anddo not flinch from disputes and challenging questions. I suspectthat this book will transform the discourse on globalization withinlinguistics and will impel a reconsideration of whether linguisticdiversity is inevitably impacted by globalprocesses.” Margaret Florey, Resource Networkfor Linguistic Diversity

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