The Hands-Off Manager: How to Mentor People and Allow Them to Be Successful

The Hands-Off Manager: How to Mentor People and Allow Them to Be Successful

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged Edition)

$24.95
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Use Standard Shipping ,  For guaranteed delivery by Dec. 24.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Hands-Off Manager: How to Mentor People and Allow Them to Be Successful 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mentor and coach....most important role of a leader. Very, very helpful!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In business today, organizations are consistently faced with the micro-managing style leaders. There is hope as Chandler and Black argue in their introduction, offering ideas, methods, practices ways of thinking, and ways of being that will allow leaders in organizations to create a team that functions as well without a manager as it does when the manager is there. The importance of leadership and mentoring coexist and play a vital role in the lifeline of an organization. Chandler and Black ask the reader would you rather inspire your people or control them? Would you rather allow the opportunity to become successful or would you prefer to force results to happen? Learning to trust that people have greatness within them, will allow leaders to unlock their people¿s potential, which will increase the level at which they perform to a lace they never imagined. The authors show step-by-step actions leaders can take to achieve the hand-off leadership methods. The book points out that there is an upside and downside to leadership actions and behaviors. To increase success of the hands-off leader, the book offers guidelines on how to handle situations and create a successful environment. Leadership can be reckless and a determining fixture for failure when poorly trained. Team players can lack enthusiasm and judgment when led by an incompetent leader. The authors stress great leadership will create a culture in which teamwork will simply grow. Organizations do not need teamwork training managers themselves need hands-off-leadership training so they can learn to mentor success instead of trying to impose productivity. An interesting chapter deals with waking up to the whole system. It is important to feel connected and bring people together. I was surprised at the example of a person being criticized in a team meeting and how the authors suggest the leader should stop the meeting and let the team know he or she is going to invite the person being criticized to the next meeting so everyone can all talk together. The idea is to bring people together and let people know how connected they are. This will eliminate the idea of unimportant people in the organization and it will help people feel more interconnected. I found this text to be enlightening and a step toward the changes needed for more effective organizational leadership versus the many ineffective micromanager leaders of today. The 223 pages of this book are straightforward and effortlessly applied by anyone who is interested in becoming a manger/leader, or currently a manager, or wishing to make changes in their leadership style. The book could without doubt be recommended for the easy chair business reader.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Steve Chandler and Duane Black present an approach to management that promises to lower your stress level, increase your happiness and allow everyone in your organization to be more creative and productive. The idea is that old-style, hands-on micromanagement does not engage today¿s workers. The book tries to persuade readers through emotional appeals, which can be illuminating but sometimes appear strained. The book includes interesting quotes from all kinds of people, including Peter Drucker, Deepak Chopra, Napoleon Hill (whom the authors criticize), Voltaire and others. We say the authors¿ core ideas are persuasive, but the style might lean a little too much on intangible insights for some readers. However, this is a great book if you are a stressed-out manager who wants to find a new approach. Read this, calm down and stop micromanaging.