Harbrace Guide to Writing / Edition 2

Harbrace Guide to Writing / Edition 2

by Cheryl Glenn
ISBN-10:
1111349096
ISBN-13:
2901111349096
Pub. Date:
01/01/2012
Publisher:
Cengage Learning

Hardcover

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Overview

Harbrace Guide to Writing / Edition 2

The first situation-based 4-in-1 writing guide (including a rhetoric, reader, research manual, and grammar handbook), Cheryl Glenn's THE HARBRACE GUIDE TO WRITING, Second Edition, brings the rhetorical situation to life. Renowned author and educator Cheryl Glenn translates rhetorical theory into easy-to-follow (and easy-to-teach) techniques that help sharpen students' ability to observe what words, assertions, or opinions might work best with a particular audience in a specific situation.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2901111349096
Publisher: Cengage Learning
Publication date: 01/01/2012
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 784
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 1.50(h) x 9.50(d)

About the Author

Distinguished Professor of English and Women's Studies and Director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at The Pennsylvania State University, Cheryl Glenn is widely known for her scholarship, leadership and teaching. Besides authoring THE HARBRACE GUIDE TO WRITING and co-authoring THE HARBRACE HANDBOOKS, she is author of the prize-winning RHETORIC RETOLD: REGENDERING THE TRADITION FROM ANTIQUITY THROUGH THE RENAISSANCE; UNSPOKEN: A RHETORIC OF SILENCE; RHETORICAL EDUCATION IN AMERICA; LANDMARK ESSSAYS ON RHETORIC AND FEMINISM; RHETORIC AND WRITING IN THE NEW CENTURY; the forthcoming RHETORICAL FEMINISM AND THIS THING CALLED HOPE and several other titles. Dr. Glenn's rhetorical scholarship has earned her many awards, including three National Endowment for the Humanities awards, the Conference on College Composition and Communication's Richard Braddock Award, Rhetoric Review's Outstanding Essay Award, Best Book/Honorable Mention from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and the 2007 Rhetorician of the Year. She has served as Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), as President of the Coalition of Feminist Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition, on the CCCC and NCTE Executive Committees; as Chair of the Modern Language Association (MLA) Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition and as a member of the MLA Delegate Assembly. Dr. Glenn's teaching and scholarship have earned her six university teaching and mentoring awards.

Table of Contents

Part I: ENTERING THE CONVERSATION: THE RHETORICAL SITUATION. 1. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Rhetoric Surrounds Us. Rhetoric: The Purposeful Use of Language and Images. Analyzing the Rhetorical Situation. Shaping Reasons to Write. Judy Brady, "Why I Want a Wife". Callout Card from ThatsNotCool.com. Creating or Finding a Rhetorical Opportunity. Selecting a Rhetorical Audience and Purpose. R. J. Matson, "Iranian Lady Liberty." Michael Berube, excerpt from LIFE AS WE KNOW IT. 2. Identifying a Fitting Response. What is a Fitting Response? Amethyst Initiative, "Rethink the Drinking Age." Recognizing a Fitting Response. Center for Science in the Public Interest, "Support 21 Coalition Press Conference on Minimum Drinking Age Law." Academic Senate of San Francisco State University, "Resolution Regarding the Rodney King Verdict." Barbara Smith, excerpt from "The Truth That Never Hurts." Using the Available Means of Persuasion. Recognizing available means. Assignment: Writing a Rhetorical Analysis. 3. Writing Processes and Strategies: From Tentative Idea to Finished Product. Finding Pleasure in Writing. Recognizing an Opportunity for Change. Planning a Response. Exploration. Organization. Rhetorical methods of development. Drafting a Response. Reconsidering audience, resources and constraints. Revising a Response. Editing and Proofreading a Response. Anastasia Simkanin, "Technology and the Learning Process: One Student's View." Part II: RHETORICAL SITUATIONS FOR COMPOSING. 4. Sharing the Experience of Taste: Responding with Memoirs. Identifying an Opportunity for Change. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. Steve Inskeep, "Ruth Reichl: Favorite Food Memoirs" [interview]. Julie Powell, excerpt from "The Julie/Julia Project." Margaret Mead, excerpt from "The Changing Significance of Food." Corby Kummer, excerpt from "Good-bye, Cryovac." Pooja Makhijani, "School Lunch." Memoirs: A Fitting Response. Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Writing a Memoir: Working with Your Available Means. Memoirs in Three Media. Student Paper: Anna Seitz, "Herb's Chicken." Alternatives to the Memoir. 5. Portraying Successful Speakers and Writers: Responding with Profiles. Identifying an Opportunity for Change. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. Ashley Parker, "What Would Obama Say?" Barack Obama, "Iowa Caucus Speech." Peggy Noonan, excerpt from "What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era." Virginia Heffernan, "Confessions of a TED Addict." Carmine Gallo, "Uncovering Steve Jobs' Presentation Secrets." Profiles: A Fitting Response. Marisa Lagos, "Successes Speak Well for Debate Coach." Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying a Fitting Response. Writing a Profile: Working with Your Available Means. Profiles in Three Media. Student paper: Matthew Glasgow, "The Liberating Mind." Alternatives to the Profile. 6. Investigating the Millennial Generation: Responding with Reports Identifying an Opportunity for Change. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. Defining a Generation. Pew Research Center, "The Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change." Derek Thompson, "What's Really the Matter with 20-Somethings." Mano Singham, "More than Millennials: Teachers Must Look Beyond Generational Stereotypes." Investigating What it Means to Grow Up in a Digital World. David Fallarme, "A Look at How Gen Y Communicates." Mark Bauerlein, "Why Gen-Y Johnny Can't Read Non-Verbal Cues." Laurie Fendrich, "Bad Student Writing? Not So Fast!" Investigative Reports: A Fitting Response. A report investigating the causes and effects of multitasking: Christine Rosen, "The Myth of Multitasking." Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying an opportunity. Locating an audience. Identifying a Fitting Response. Finding a purpose and shaping a fitting response. Writing an Investigative Report: Working with Your Available Means. Shaping your investigative report. Revision and Peer Review. Reports in Three Media. Student paper: Jenn Mayer, "The Last of the Music Videos." Alternatives to the Investigative Report. 7. Persuading in a Multilingual Context: Responding with Position Arguments. Identifying an Opportunity for Change. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. S. I. Hayakawa, excerpt from "One Nation . . . Indivisible? The English Language Amendment." Geoffrey Nunberg, excerpt from "The Official English Movement: Reimagining America." Hyon B. Shin with Rosalind Bruno, excerpt from "Language Use and English-Speaking Ability: Census 2000 Brief." Juan F. Perea, excerpt from "Los Olvidados: On the Making of Invisible People." Richard Rodriguez, excerpt from "Hunger of Memory." Position Arguments: A Fitting Response. Gabriela Kuntz, "My Spanish Standoff." Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying a Fitting Response. Writing a Position Argument: Working with Your Available Means. Arguments in Three Media. Alicia Williams, "The Ethos of American Sign Language." Alternatives to the Position Argument. 8. The Future of College: Responding with Proposals. Identifying an Opportunity. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. How Will College Be Delivered? Gregory M. Lamb, "The Future of College May Be Virtual." Anya Kamenetz, "How Web-Savvy Edupunks are Transforming American Higher Education." Mark David Milliron, "Online Education vs. Traditional Learning: Time to End the Family Feud." How Can We Make College Affordable? Joseph Marr Cronin and Howard E. Horton, "Will Higher Education Be the Next Bubble to Burst?" George D. Kuh, "Maybe Experience Really Can Be the Best Teacher." Center for College Affordability and Productivity, "25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College, #1: Encourage More Students to Attend Community Colleges." Proposals: A Fitting Response. A proposal for reframing the Humanities: Alain de Botton, "Can Tolstoy Save Your Marriage?" Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying an opportunity. Locating an audience. Identifying a Fitting Response. Finding a purpose and shaping a fitting response. Considering your proposal's acceptability and feasibility. Writing a Proposal: Working with Your Available Means. Shaping your proposal. Revision and Peer Review. Proposals in Three Media. Student paper: Ryan T. Normandin, "OpenCourseWare and the Future of Education." ALTERNATIVES TO THE PROPOSAL. 9. Reviewing Visual Culture: Responding with Critical Evaluations. Identifying an Opportunity for Change. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. Kenneth Turan, "An Apocalypse of Kinetic Joy." Bob Graham, "Lost in the Matrix." Dmitri Siegel, "Paper, Plastic, or Canvas?" Jonathan Glancey, "Classics of Everyday Design No 12"[: The Neon Light]. Evaluations: A Fitting Response. Mike D'Angelo, "Unreally, Really Cool: Stop-Motion Movies May Be Old School, But They Still Eat Other Animation for Breakfast." Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying a Fitting Response. Writing an Evaluation: Working with Your Available Means. Evaluations in Three Media. Alexis Walker, "Donuts at Easton's Center Circle: Slam Dunk or Cycle of Deterioration?" Alternatives to the Evaluation. 10. Exploring the Global Village: Responding with Critical Analyses. Identifying an Opportunity. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. Tracing the causes and consequences of the global village. Marshall McLuhan, excerpt from Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. John Battelle, A Brief Interview with Michael Wesch [Creator of Web 2.0 ... The Machine is Us/ing Us]. Tools for bringing the world together. Richard Stengel, "Time's Person of the Year: Mark Zuckerberg." Michael E. Ross, "Twitter-verse Draws More Black Followers into its Orbit." Critical Analysis: A Fitting Response. Russell Watson "When Words Are the Best Weapon." Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying an opportunity. Locating an audience. Identifying a Fitting Response. Finding a purpose and shaping a fitting response. Writing a Critical Analysis: Working with Your Available Means. Shaping your critical analysis. Revision and peer review. Critical Analyses in Three Media. Student paper: Anna Seitz, "The Real-Time Consequences of an Online Degree." ALTERNATIVES TO THE CRITICAL ANALYSIS. 11. Everyday Reading: Responding with Literary Analyses. Identifying an Opportunity. Real Situations. Real Responses to Real Situations. Writers on Reading. Mortimer Adler, "How to Mark a Book." Sherman Alexie, "Superman and Me." Marianne Gingher, excerpt from "The Most Double-D-Daring Book I Read." Marianne Moore, "Poetry." Literary Analysis: A Fitting Response. Genres of literature. Elements of literature. A literary analysis: Ralph Rees, excerpt from "The Reality of Imagination in the Poetry of Marianne Moore." Reading actively. Keeping a reading journal. Alice Walker, "Everyday Use." Joy Harjo, "Perhaps the World Ends Here." Jane Martin, Beauty. Guide to Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Identifying an opportunity. Locating an audience. Identifying a Fitting Response. Finding a purpose and shaping a fitting response. Writing a Literary Analysis: Working with Your Available Means. Shaping your literary analysis. Revision and peer review. Literary Analyses in Three Media. Student paper: Matthew Marusak, "Backward Enough: Alice Walker's Unreliable Narrator." ALTERNATIVES TO THE LITERARY ANALYSIS. Part III: MULTIMEDIA COMPOSITIONS. 12. Analyzing Multimedia. Multimedia and the Rhetorical Situation. Using Multimedia to Address a Rhetorical Opportunity. Using Multimedia to Address an Audience. Using Multimedia with a Rhetorical Purpose. Using Multimedia as a Fitting Response. Using Multimedia as an Available Means. 13. Responding with Multimedia. A Rhetorical Approach to Wikis, Blogs, and Other Websites. Invention and Memory. Arrangement. Style. Delivery. A Rhetorical Approach to Podcasting. Invention and Memory. Arrangement. Style. Delivery. A Rhetorical Approach to Broadcasting over YouTube. Invention and Memory. Arrangement. Style. Delivery. Facebook and Twitter as Multimedia. Challenges and Pleasures of Multimedia. Part IV: A GUIDE TO RESEARCH. 14. Research and the Rhetorical Situation. An Overview of Research. Rhetorical Opportunity and the Research Question. Research and Audience. Research and Purpose. Research and a Fitting Response. Research and Constraints and Resources. 15. Research in the Library and Online. Sources for Research. Books. Periodicals. Online and audiovisual sources. Finding Sources in Print and Online. Finding books. Finding articles. Finding images. Finding government documents. Finding resources in special collections. Additional advice for finding sources online. 16. Field Research. Basic Principles of Fieldwork. Observation in a real-world environment. Testing assumptions. Triangulation. Basic principles at work: Deborah Tannen's naturalistic study. Methods for Fieldwork. Using observation. Mike Rose, excerpt from The Mind at Work. Taking notes. Asking questions. Gillian Petrie, interview of Jan Frese. Organizing a Field Research Study. 17. Managing the Research Process. Keeping a Research Log. Establishing the rhetorical opportunity, purpose, and research question. Identifying the sources. Taking notes. Responding to notes. Establishing the audience. Preparing a Working Bibliography. Annotating a Bibliography. Planning a Research Paper. Crafting a working thesis. Dealing with areas of tension in the research findings. 18. Reading, Evaluating, and Responding to Sources. Reading with Your Audience and Purpose in Mind. Summarizing. Using function statements. William Lutz, "Doubts about Doublespeak." Clustering and ordering. Student summary: Jacob Thomas, "Summary of 'Doubts about Doublespeak.'" Partial summaries. Paraphrasing. Quoting Sources in Your Paper. Using attributive tags. Including question marks or exclamation points. Quoting memorable words or phrases. Modifying quotations with square brackets or ellipsis points. Using block quotations. Evaluating and Responding to Your Sources. Currency. Coverage. Reliability. Soundness of reasoning. Stance of the author. 19. Acknowledging Sources. Why Acknowledge Sources? Which Sources to Cite. Common Citation Errors. MLA Guidelines for In-Text Citations. MLA Guidelines for Documenting Works Cited. Books. Articles. Other print sources. Live performances and recordings. Images. Online sources and databases. CHECKING OVER A WORKS-CITED LIST. Sample MLA Research Paper: Hannah Lewis, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: Contextualizing, Criticizing, and Mobilizing. APA Guidelines for In-Text Citations. APA Guidelines for Documenting References. Books. Articles in print. Sources produced for access by computer. Other sources. CHECKING OVER A REFERENCES LIST. Sample APA Research Paper: Catherine L. Davis, "Perceptions of Peers' Drinking Behavior. Part V: A RHETORICAL GUIDE TO GRAMMAR AND SENTENCE STYLE. 20. Word Classes and Rhetorical Effects. Nouns. Determiners. Verbs. Phrasal Verbs. Adjectives. Adverbs. Pronouns. Personal pronouns. Demonstrative pronouns. Interrogative pronouns. Reflexive and intensive pronouns. Indefinite pronouns. Prepositions and Adverbial Particles. Conjunctions. Expletives. Interjections. 21. Sentence Structure and Rhetorical Effects. Phrases. Noun phrases. Prepositional phrases. Verb phrases. Verbal phrases. Subjects and Predicates. Sentence Patterns. Passive Voice. Sentence Types. Declarative sentences. Imperative sentences. Interrogative sentences. Exclamatory sentences. Clauses. Relative (adjectival) clauses. Adverbial clauses. Noun clauses. Sentence Classification. Simple sentences. Compound sentences. Complex sentences. Compound-complex sentences. 22. Editing for Clarity and Style. Precision. Accurate words. Fresh expressions. Clear metaphors. Clear definitions. Clear pronoun use. Conciseness. Making every word count. Eliminating wordiness from clauses. Using elliptical constructions. Conventions. Usage. Idioms. Spelling. Inclusive language. Negation. Completeness and Consistency. Talking versus writing. Complete and consistent comparisons. Verb tense consistency. Consistency of pronoun usage through agreement. Coherence. Placement of old and new information. Linking through words. Parallelism—linking through structure. Effective nominalizations. Subject-verb agreement. Placing modifiers. Connecting words, phrases, or clauses. Variety and Emphasis. Sentence length. Unusual sentence patterns. Combining sentences. Questions, exclamations, and imperative sentences. 23. Punctuation, Mechanics, and Rhetorical Effects. Guide to Punctuation. Apostrophe '. Brackets [ ]. Colon :. Comma ,. Dash—. Ellipsis points…. Exclamation point ! . Hyphen - . Parentheses ( ) . Period . . Question mark ?. Quotation marks " ". Semicolon ;. Slash /. Punctuation Trouble Spots. Sentence fragments. Comma splices. Fused sentences. Guide to Mechanics. Abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms. Capitalization. Italics. Numbers. Glossary of Usage. Appendix of Academic Writing. Credits. Index.

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