×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Harlem Renaissance
     

Harlem Renaissance

by Mark Irving Helbling
 

During the Harlem Renaissance, African-American culture flourished. The period gave birth to numerous significant and enduring creative works that were at once American and emblematic of the black experience in particular. It was a time when African-American culture became more distinct from American culture in general, though it also continued to be a part of

Overview

During the Harlem Renaissance, African-American culture flourished. The period gave birth to numerous significant and enduring creative works that were at once American and emblematic of the black experience in particular. It was a time when African-American culture became more distinct from American culture in general, though it also continued to be a part of America's larger cultural heritage. While the writers, artists, and intellectuals who contributed to the Harlem Renaissance recognized that they had much in common, they also sought to distinguish themselves from one another. This book approaches the achievement of the Harlem Renaissance from the perspective of the conflict between individual and group identity.

According to W.E.B. Du Bois, black intellectuals of the period sought to be both Negroes and Americans. At the same time, the relationship of the individual to the group was no less problematic and served to inspire, as well as complicate, the imaginations of the principal figures discussed in this book—W.E.B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, and Zora Neale Hurston. As a consequence, this study focuses on the tension each of these individuals felt as he or she sought to construct a narrative that mirrored this complex experience as well as the problematics of one's own self-identity.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This study focuses on five important individuals (W.E.B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, and Zora Neale Hurston) from that remarkable generation of poets, novelists, playwrights, painters, essayists, and musicians who collectively represent what is now known as the Harlem Renaissance. Following the introduction, Helbling (American Studies, U. of Hawaii) presents six essays that show how these individuals struggled to come to terms with the tension between the one and the many. They demonstrate that each in his or her own way attempted to establish the self that challenged the claims others sought to impose. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313310478
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/30/1999
Series:
Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies: Contemporary Black Poets Series
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,073,261
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.63(d)
Lexile:
1690L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

MARK HELBLING is Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. He has also taught in Africa and Germany. His essays have appeared in such journals as Prospects: An Annual of American Cultural Studies, Phylon, Negro American Literature Forum, Polish Review, Research Studies, and Ethnic Forum.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews