ISBN-10:
0697354873
ISBN-13:
2900697354876
Pub. Date:
01/01/2002
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Harmony in Context / Edition 1

Harmony in Context / Edition 1

by Miguel Roig-FrancoliMiguel Roig-Francoli
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Overview

Designed for undergraduate music majors, Harmony in Context successfully teaches a wide range of tonal mechanics,all richly contextualized by discussions of large-scale formal functions,by illustrations representing a great diversity of genres and repertoires,and by close attention to historical style periods.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900697354876
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date: 01/01/2002
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 944
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

Table of Contents

Preface A Message to the Student: Why Do We Study Music Theory?
INTRODUCTION: THE FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC

Chapter A Pitch: Notation and Intervals

The notation of pitch; intervals; the overtone series; consonant and dissonant intervals

Chapter B Rhythm and Meter

Durational symbols; pulse, beat, and meter; tempo; simple and compound meters; the notation of meter; metric accent; choosing a meter to notate a melody; asymmetrical meters; irregular divisions of the beat; irregular rhythmic and metric relationships; some notes on the correct notation of rhythm

Chapter C Tonality: Scales, Keys, and Transposition
Modes and scales; key signatures; other modes and scales; transposition: related issues

Chapter D Introduction to Species Counterpoint
The melodic line in species counterpoint; general guidelines for two-part counterpoint; first species; second species; fourth species

Chapter E The Rudiments of Harmony I: Triads and Seventh Chords

Chords; triads; seventh chords

Chapter F The Rudiments of Harmony II: Labeling Chords

Harmonic function, Roman numerals; figured bass;

Chapter G Musical Style

The elements of style; the musical style periods; A characteristic Renaissance style: sacred vocal polyphony; the Baroque style; the Classical style; the Romantic style; the twentieth century; conclusions
1: DIATONIC HARMONY

Chapter 1 The Connection of Chords

Harmonic progression; notating, voicing, and spacing chords; chord connection: the principles of part writing; melodic style; voice independence; why all these rules?

Chapter 2 The Tonic and Dominant Triads in Root Position

The tonic triad; the dominant triad; the I-V-I progression: the principles of prolongation; connecting the tonic and dominant chords; the I-V-I progression as a form-generating structure

Chapter 3 Harmonic Function; the Subdominant Triad in Root Position

The basic harmonic functions; the subdominant triad; IV as prolongation of I; elaborating the I-V-I progression

Chapter 4 Texture; Triads in First Inversion

Texture; the triad in first inversion; the neighbor V6; elaborating the I-V-I progression; parallel 6/3 chords; harmonizing a melody

Chapter 5 Cadences

Authentic cadences; the half cadence; the plagal cadence; the deceptive cadence; cadences :summary and voice leading

Chapter 6 Melodic Organization I: Phrase Structure

Motive; phrase; period structure; form diagrams; bass reductions; more on period structure; phrase group; the technique of interruption

Chapter 7 Melodic Organization II: Thematic Development; Phrase Extension; Formal Functions

Melodic developmental techniques; phrase extension; extending period structures; introduction to formal functions; thematic development in developmental sections

Chapter 8 Nonchord Tones

The passing tone; the neighbor note; the anticipation; incomplete neighbors; suspensions; pedal point

Chapter 9. 6/4 Chords.

Consonant 6/4 chords; dissonant 6/4 chords; the neighbor 6/4; compound melody; the passing 6/4; the cadential 6/4; harmonizing melodies with 6/4 chords; pitch patterns

Chapter 10 The Supertonic; Metric Reduction

The supertonic in root position; the supertonic in first inversion; the supertonic and the cadential 6/4; metric reduction; pitch patterns

Chapter 11 Harmonic Rhythm. Hypermeter

Harmonic rhythm; hypermeter; harmony, rhythm, and meter: tonal and metric accents; metric-harmonic “rhyme” and conflict; writing your own progressions; harmonizing a melody with keyboard figuration

Chapter 12 The Dominant Seventh and Its Inversions

V7 in root position; inversions of the dominant seventh; combining prolongational chords

Chapter 13 The Leading-Tone Triad

Doubling and voice leading; the passing viio6; viio6 as a dominant substitute; the leading-tone cadence;

Chapter 14 The Mediant, Submediant, and Subtonic Triads; Diatonic Sequences

The mediant and submediant triads; the subtonic; other uses of the mediant and submediant; harmonic sequences; more on the 5-6 technique; pitch patterns

Chapter 15 Other Diatonic Seventh Chords

General doubling and voice-leading guidelines; the leading-tone sevenths; the half-diminished seventh; the fully-diminished seventh; the supertonic seventh; the subdominant seventh; the diatonic-seventh circle of 5ths; pitch patterns
Appendix to Part 1. Summary and Application: Diatonic Harmony in Context; Diatonic Functions and Performance
2: CHROMATIC HARMONY AND FORM

Chapter 16 Secondary Dominants I

Chromatic harmony; tonicization: secondary dominants; V7 of V; V7 of IV (iv); elaborating a diatonic framework with chromatic harmony; pitch patterns

Chapter 17 Secondary Dominants II

V7 of ii; V7 of vi (VI); V7 of iii (III); V7 of VII; deceptive resolutions of secondary dominants; consecutive secondary dominants: chromatic sequences; secondary key areas; pitch patterns

Chapter 18 Secondary Leading-Tone Chords

Secondary leading-tone seventh chords; secondary viio7 chords in inversion; the viio7 over a pedal point; a chromatic harmonization of a diatonic tune: Bach Chorale 21; secondary functions in context: two songs by Mozart; pitch patterns

Chapter 19 Modulation to Closely-Related Keys

Key relationships: closely-related keys; diatonic pivot-chord modulation; modulation to V; modulation to the relative major and minor keys; writing pivot chord modulations; modulation to ii and iii from a major key; chromatic modulation; writing chromatic modulations; modulation to VII in minor; modulation and phrase structure: sequential and phrase modulation, modulating periods; modulatory processes; harmonizing modulating melodies; pitch patterns

Chapter 20 Small Forms: Binary and Ternary

The binary principle; binary tonal types; binary formal designs; the ternary principle

Chapter 21 Contrapuntal Genres

The chorale prelude; the two-voice invention; Bach: Invention no. 3, in DM; the fugue; the fugato

Chapter 22 Modal Mixture. Variation Forms

Change of mode; borrowed chords; variation forms; continuous variations; sectional variations; pitch patterns

Chapter 23 The Neapolitan and Augmented Sixth Chords

The Neapolitan Sixth; tonicization of the Neapolitan; the Neapolitan in root position; tritone substitution: the Neapolitan as a substitute for V7; augmented sixth chords with a predominant function; the Italian +6; the German +6; the French +6; other types of +6 chords; summary

Chapter 24 Chromatic Modulatory Techniques. Modulation to Distantly Related Keys I

Chromatic pivot chords; writing chromatic pivot chord modulations; modulation by enharmonic reinterpretation of the Gr +6; writing modulations with +6 chords; the Neapolitan as a key area; modulation by enharmonic reinterpretation of viio7; writing modulations with viio7 chords; chromatic linear modulatory processes; pitch patterns

Chapter 25 Modulation to Distantly Related Keys II

Chromatic-third relationships; triads related by chromatic third; keys related by chromatic third: common-tone modulation; chromatic-third relationships in modulatory processes; linear chromaticism I: linear chromatic chords; altered triads; augmented sixth chords with dominant and embellishing functions; the common-tone diminished seventh chord; pitch patterns

Chapter 26 Introduction to Large Forms

Sonata Form; Mozart, Piano Sonata in CM, K. 309, I; guided studies of sonata form; the Rondo; a five-part rondo: Haydn, Piano Sonata in DM, Hob. XVI:37, III; guided studies of rondo form

Chapter 27 Expanding Functional Tonality: Extended Tertian Chords; Linear Chromaticism II

Expanding chordal sonorities: extended tertian chords; A Fragment by William Grant Still; linear chromaticism II: linear expansions of tonality; appoggiatura chords; chromatic sequences; non-sequential linear processes; pitch patterns

Chapter 28 The German Romantic Lied: Chromatic Harmony in Context.

The German Romantic Lied; analysis 1: Schubert, Erlkonig; analysis 2: Schumann: “Widmung”; modulation by enharmonic reinterpretation of V; analysis 3: Wolf, “Das verlassene Magdlein”: a summary of chromatic functions; pitch patterns

Chapter 29 Toward (And Beyond) the Limits of Functional Tonality

Tonal ambiguity and implied tonality; equal divisions of the octave; beyond the confines of functional tonality; pitch patterns

Chapter 30 Non-Functional Pitch Centricity

Parsimonious voice-leading: the PLR model; alternatives to chromaticism: non-functional diatonic collections; symmetrical scales; conclusions, pitch patternstch patternstch patternstch patternstch patterns

Introduction

THE FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSICChapter A Pitch: Notation and Intervals The notation of pitch; intervals; the overtone series; consonant and dissonant intervals Chapter B Rhythm and Meter Durational symbols; pulse, beat, and meter; tempo; simple and compound meters; the notation of meter; metric accent; choosing a meter to notate a melody; asymmetrical meters; irregular divisions of the beat; irregular rhythmic and metric relationships; some notes on the correct notation of rhythm Chapter C Tonality: Scales, Keys, and Transposition Modes and scales; key signatures; other modes and scales; transposition: related issues Chapter D Introduction to Species Counterpoint The melodic line in species counterpoint; general guidelines for two-part counterpoint; first species; second species; fourth species Chapter E The Rudiments of Harmony I: Triads and Seventh Chords Chords; triads; seventh chords (and more...)

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