Harsha: A Political Study

Harsha: A Political Study

by D. Devahuti

Hardcover(REV)

$29.95

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780195642377
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date: 04/29/1999
Edition description: REV
Pages: 408
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

LIST OF PLATES
xix(2)
GUIDE TO PRONUNCIATION xxi(3)
ABBREVIATIONS xxiv
I. SOURCES
1(14)
Need for appraisal of post-Gupta political milieu--Epigraphic evidence.
1(1)
Architectural evidence--Texts on polity--Literary works--Biographies and travel accounts.
2(1)
Hsuan-tsang's testimony; his family background, attitudes and interpretation of data.
3(3)
Reliability of figures in Hsi Yu Chi.
6(2)
Is Hsuan-tsang partial to Harsha?
8(2)
Testimony of Hsuan-tsang's biography, the 'Life'.
10(1)
Testimony of Harsha's biography by Bana.
11(4)
II. FROM REGIONAL KINGDOMS TOWARDS AN EMPIRE (NORTHERN INDIA c. A.D. 550-600)
15(50)
Decline of Imperial Guptas--Huna attacks--Last emperors.
15(2)
Later Guptas--Founder, Krishna-gupta--Unrelated to Imperial Guptas.
17(1)
Early home--Translocation between Malava and Magadha--Malava theory.
18(1)
Magadha theory.
19(3)
Damodara-gupta--Maha-sena-gupta
22(1)
Attacks on Magadha and exit of Maha-sena-gupta
23(1)
Malava of Maha-sena-gupta.
24(3)
Madhava-gupta.
27(1)
Maukharis--Origin of name--Maukhari records, earliest references
28(1)
Post-Gupta Maukharis.
29(1)
Isana-varman.
30(1)
Surya-varman--Sarva-varman.
31(2)
Avanti-varman.
33(1)
Dates of Isana-, Sarva- and Avanti-varman
34(1)
Graha-varman and 'Suva'.
35(1)
Malava and Gauda axis against Kanauj.
36(1)
Defeat of Kanauj and Vardhana involvement--Bengal and Sasanka--Vanga, Samatata and Gauda--Sasanka unrelated to Guptas.
37(1)
Mahasamanta Sasanka's overlord.
38(1)
Sasanka, a Gauda or a Magadha--His predecessors in Vanga and Gauda.
39(1)
Samachara-deva--Coins of 'Jaya'--Sasanka's coins.
40(1)
Order of succession of Jaya and Sasanka.
41(1)
Jaya-naga.
42(2)
Sasanka as independent ruler.
44(2)
His hostility to Buddhism.
46(2)
Did Sasanka regain Magadha?
48(1)
Control over parts of Orissa.
49(3)
Sasanka's death and further extension of Harsha's empire.
52(1)
Maitrakas of Valabhi--Decline of the Guptas and early Maitrakas, Bhatarka and Dharasena I.
53(1)
Drona-simha and his overlord.
54(1)
Dhruva-sena I.
55(1)
Guha-sena--Dhara-sena II.
56(1)
Siladitya I, Dharmaditya; devolution of power to brother and son
57(1)
South Lo and north Lo of Hsuan-tsang--Vardhana, Maitraka and Chalukya stakes in Malava.
58(1)
Khara-graha I, Dhara-sena III and diminution of Maitraka power owing to Pula-kesin.
59(1)
Dhruva-sena II, Baladitya, son-in-law and subordinate of Harsha.
60(1)
Harsha's Valabhi campaign--Dhruva-sena's temporary asylum with Gurjara Dadda II.
61(1)
Harsha's alliance with Dhruva-sena II through matrimony and gift of Malava territory.
62(2)
Dhara-sena IV and restoration of Maitraka power.
64(1)
III.THE VARDHANAS
65(30)
Sthanv-isvara--Situation.
65(1)
Flora and fauna--Economic life--Religion.
66(1)
Pushpa-bhuti, Nagas and Imperial Guptas.
67(1)
Immediateancestors of Prabhakara-vardhana.
68(1)
Prabhakara-vardhana.
69(1)
Hunas--Sindh.
70(1)
Gurjaras.
71(1)
Gandhara.
72(1)
Latas--Malava.
73(1)
Royal family.
74(2)
Bhandi--Malava princes.
76(2)
Vardhana-Maukhari matrimonial alliance.
78(1)
Rajya-vardhana's Huna campaign--Prabhakara-vardhana's death-bed bequest to Harsha.
79(2)
Malava-Gauda-Kanauj conflict and Sthanv-isvara.
81(2)
Rajya-vardhana's death.
83(2)
Sasanka's exit--Harsha assumes charge.
85(1)
Sthanv-isvara-Kama-rupa alliance.
86(2)
Bhandi's return.
88(1)
Rajya-sri's recovery.
89(2)
Harsha's cautious accession to Kanauj.
91(4)
IV. THE EXTENT OF HARSHA'S EMPIRE
95(34)
Harsha's motives for dig-vijaya--Eastward march and Sasanka's discomfiture.
95(1)
'Five Indias' of Hsuan-tsang and of indigenous literature.
96(3)
Cities occupiedbetween Kanauj and Bengal.
99(3)
Probable westward march of consolidation--Cities occupied between Kanauj and China-bhukti in Punjab.
102(2)
Limits of Harsha's direct and indirect control in the west.
104(1)
Extension of control in the east after Sasanka's death.
105(1)
Valabhi.
106(1)
Clash with Chalukyas.
107(3)
The four central Indian kingdoms.
110(1)
Incursion into Kashmir.
111(2)
Orissa.
113(1)
Examination of theory that Harsha had military successes in the South.
114(8)
That he conquered Nepal.
122(7)
V. THE PRINCIPLES OF POLITY
129(35)
Harsha's political heritage--Legal texts of Harsha's period.
129(1)
Other sources--Some characteristic features of Indian polity.
130(1)
Fundamental concepts: Dharma.
131(1)
Dharma and rita in Vedas--Dharma and kshatra in Brahmanas and Upanishads--Truth and Dharma.
132(1)
Dharma over kshatra.
133(1)
Varn-asrama dharma--Dharma in Buddhism.
134(1)
Dharma in early Mauryan polity.
135(1)
Three types of conquest, dharma, lobha, asura--Kautilyan and Asokan views on polity compared and contrasted.
136(1)
Gods in royal epithets.
137(1)
Dharma as universal law, social law and centrality in Buddhism--Dharma in smritis, Manu.
138(1)
Dharma in tri-varga--Artha.
139(1)
BarhaspatyaSatra on artha.
140(1)
Danda--Kautilya on danda.
141(1)
Manu on danda.
142(1)
Maha-bharata on raja-dharma and danda.
143(1)
Kamandaka on danda--Orthodoxy vs. heterodoxy--Views of atheist Lokayata school on knowledge, creation, society and kingship.
144(1)
Buddhist views on kingship.
145(1)
Era of mythology, correlation of gods and humans in political and social institutions.
146(1)
Era of inquiry, man and universe.
147(1)
Thoughtful and popular views of state and kingship.
148(2)
Polity in post-A.D. 400 period.
150(1)
Smriti of Katyayana--King's rights and functions.
151(1)
Harita on king--Niti-sara of Kamandaka--Date.
152(2)
Synopsis.
154(2)
Mandala system.
156(2)
Sandhi, peace or alliance--Advice to conqueror.
158(1)
Terms of unequal alliance--Significance of Mandala.
159(1)
War and varn-asrama.
160(1)
Conqueror and praja in expanded mandala--Political conceptualization of diversity in unity.
161(3)
VI. HARSHA'S ADMINISTRATION
164(74)
Contemporary sources--Hsuan-tsang's general remarks on crime and justice.
164(1)
Taxation, people's temperament, dress and hygiene, language, description of Kanauj.
165(1)
Education.
166(1)
Economic activity--Inland trade.
167(1)
Foreign contacts with west and Central Asia, China and South-east Asia, Africa.
168(2)
General prosperity--Architecture.
170(1)
Life in a forest district.
171(1)
Harsha, king and man.
172(1)
King and people.
173(3)
King and subordinate rulers.
176(2)
Harsha's literary and artistic talents.
178(1)
Patronage to learning.
179(1)
Attitude to religion.
180(1)
Kingly ideal--Personality.
181(1)
Mode of government, hereditary monarchy.
182(1)
Grandiloquent titles.
183(1)
Lesser kings.
184(1)
Categories of subordinates.
185(1)
Non-Aryan samantas.
186(1)
Mandala in action.
187(1)
Samanta institution--various roles of samanta.
188(3)
King's rights overland.
191(1)
Land or/and land-tax as salary to state officials.
192(2)
Land and political status--Samanta's income from land--Land as charity.
194(1)
Secular land-grants--Nature of sources for reconstruction of administrative organization.
195(2)
King, Council and the Central Secretariat.
197(3)
Military proficiency of ministers.
200(1)
Maha-sandhi-vigrah-adhikrita, minister of peace and war or interstate relations--Kumar-amatya.
201(3)
Rahasi-niyukta, king's private secretary--Pratihara.
204(1)
Skandha-vara, the royal quarters.
205(2)
Religion and social welfare.
207(2)
Law and justice--King in relation to other founts of law.
209(1)
King as head of justice.
210(1)
Courts of justice--Definition and scope of lawsuit.
211(1)
Court procedure.
212(1)
Pramatara.
213(1)
Police--Courier service.
214(1)
Army's composition--Recruitment, war and peacetime duties.
215(1)
Size.
216(1)
Elephant corps.
217(2)
Cavalry.
219(1)
Infantry.
220(1)
Army officers.
221(1)
Informal character of army.
222(1)
Pace of travelling--Units of administration--desa.
223(1)
Hsuan-tsang's seventy countries--Bhukti, vishaya, pathaka, and grama.
224(1)
Desa and its governor.
225(1)
Bhukti and its governor--Vishaya or district and its officers.
226(1)
District council.
227(1)
District law-court--Grama or village.
228(2)
Economy and administration of a forest settlement.
230(1)
Agriculture.
231(5)
Traditional taxes and fines.
236(2)
VII. THE SINO-INDIAN MISSIONS AND THE DEATH OF HARSHA
238(26)
Chinese sources of information.
238(1)
Names and descriptions of works utilized.
239(1)
Translation of relevant passages from the Chi ku-chin fo tao lun-heng.
240(1)
Fa-yuan chu-lin--T'ung-tien.
241(1)
Chiu t'ang-shu.
242(2)
T'ang hui-yao.
244(1)
T'ai-p'ing yu-lan--T'ai-p'ing huan-yu chi--Tz'e-fu yuan-kuei.
245(1)
Hsin t'ang-shu.
246(1)
Tsu-chih t'ung-chien.
247(1)
Wen-hsien t'ung-k'ao.
248(1)
Objectives of Sino-Indian missions--Contact initiated by Harsha, 'King of Magadha'.
249(1)
Did Hsuan-tsang prompt diplomatic exchanges?
250(1)
Facts of six missions between Harsha and T'ai-tsung.
251(2)
Seventh century contacts, link in a long tradition--Political and cultural interest of Harsha-T'ai-tsung embassies.
253(2)
Indian science in China.
255(1)
Superior tone of Chinese official histories; India.
256(1)
Gandhara.
257(1)
Majapahit Java.
258(1)
Reception of embassies--Adventures of last Chinese mission of 648, led by Wang Hsuan-ts'e--Arrival after death of Harsha and encounter with Magadhan governor A-lo-na-shun.
259(1)
Probable causes of conflict--Wang Hsuan-ts'e's flight to Tibet and return with reinforcements--Battle of Champaran and defeat of A-lo-na-shun.
260(1)
Identification of A-lo-na-shun's kingdom and capital, respectively with Tirhut and Champaran on R. Gandaki.
261(1)
Completion of mission and return to China with A-lo-na-shun.
262(2)
VIII. CONCLUSION
264(5)
Forms of government in ancient India--Aim of state--Political concepts: chakra-varti; three types of conquest, righteous, for greed, demonic; mandala.
264(1)
Indian view of politics.
265(1)
Harsha's political efforts and achievements--Policies.
266(1)
An estimate of Harsha and histimes.
267(2)
APPENDIX I. THE HARSHA ERA 269(3)
APPENDIX II. THE COINS OF HARSHA SILADITYA 272(8)
APPENDIX III. MAUKHARI COINS 280(1)
APPENDIX IV A AND B.EXCHANGE OF LETTERS BETWEEN MONKS IN MAHA-BODHI MONASTERY IN BODH GAYA AND HSUAN-TSANG IN TA TZ'U-EN MONASTERY IN CH'ANG-AN (SIAN) 281(17)
GENEALOGICAL TABLES Vardhanas--Later Guptas--Maukharis--Maitrakas--Chalukyas--Pallavas 298(7)
BIBLIOGRAPHY 305(17)
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF CHINESE SOURCES 322(3)
INDEX 325
LIST OF PLATES (AT END)
Banskhera plate of Harsha of the year 22 (A.D. 628-9) with Harsha's signature (E.I. iv). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India.
Sonpat copper seal inscription of Harsha-vardhana with bull emblem (C.I.I. iii). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
Nalanda clay seal of Harsha with bull emblem (E.I. xxi). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
Aihole inscription of Chalukya Pula-kesin II of Saka 556, A.D. 634-5. Line II refers to Harsha (E.I.iv). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
Nausari copper-plate grant of Gurjara Jaya-bhata III of the year 456 (K.s.) (A.D. 706). Line 4 refers to Harsha-deva; (I.A. xiii). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
Asirgadh seal of Sarva-varman Maukhari (C.I.I.iii). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
Rohtasgadh rock-cut seal-mould of Maha-samanta Sasanka-deva (C.I.I. iii). Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
General view of stupa, site 3, Nalanda. Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India
Generalview of monasteries, Nalanda. Courtesy, Archaeological Survey of India

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