Hear Our Defeats

Hear Our Defeats

Paperback

$15.30 $17.00 Save 10% Current price is $15.3, Original price is $17. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Friday, February 22

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781609455002
Publisher: Europa Editions, Incorporated
Publication date: 01/22/2019
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.25(h) x (d)

About the Author

Laurent Gaudé is a French novelist and playwright. After being nominated for the 2002 Prix Concourt with The Death of King Tsongor, he won the award in 2004 for his novel The Sun of the Scorta.

Alison Anderson’s translations for Europa Editions include novels by Sélim Nassib, Amélie Nothomb, and Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt. She is the translator of The Elegance of the Hedgehog (Europa, 2008) and The Life of Elves (Europa, 2016) by Muriel Barbery.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Hear Our Defeats 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
marilivtollefson 19 days ago
Laurent Gaudé’s Hear our Defeats reads like a canticle. The novel is bookended by the primary stories of Assem, a French intelligence officer sent to “neutralize” a US Special Forces agent gone rogue. Assem spends an unforgettable night before he receives this assignment with Mariam, an Iraqi archaeologist committed to saving artifacts being destroyed by ISIS, one of which she secretly gifts to Assem. Assem and Mariam’s threads are punctuated by stories of Hannibal’s battle against ancient Rome, Haile Selassie’s rise and fall, and Grant’s bloody victories during the American civil war. Each chapter is named by a setting in which most of the action takes place, although not at the same time. For example, in the chapter Addis Ababa, Assem meets with Job, the Special Forces agent, post-2011, and Selassie returns from exile, 1941. The chapter also includes bits of narrative from Hannibal, who, like Selassie plans his next move into a new era, circa 218 BC. Given that these dates are not in the text, this fluid back and forth acts as a mellifluous conversation transcending time and place. The lack of dates and frequent switching of contexts also makes the book a little confusing. History plays a personified role in the story. It is often capitalized, like it is a force of its own, a decider of fates. Assem feels “sucked in” by History, by what it's put him through. He feels his words have been taken from him by History. Mariam helps him regain some control with her relic, a concrete sign that all is not lost. So, too, Assem helps Mariam regain delight in her withering body. To History, Assem says “hear our defeats.” Prayer-like, the phrase is an invitation to become one of “our,” to add to his and Mariam's ongoing story of victory and defeat in the face of indifferent History. A hopeful and probing literary gem by Goncourt Prize-winner, Laurent Gaudé, Hear Our Defeats is a dignified plea to engage with History.