Heart of Darkness: (Classics Deluxe Edition)

Heart of Darkness: (Classics Deluxe Edition)

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Overview

Joseph Conrad's enduring portrait of the ugliness of colonialism in a deluxe edition with a gripping cover by Hellboy artist Mike Mignola. Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read

Heart of Darkness is the thrilling tale of Marlow, a seaman and wanderer recounting his physical and psychological journey in search of the infamous ivory trader Kurtz. Traveling upriver into the heart of the African continent, he gradually becomes obsessed by this enigmatic, wraith-like figure. Marlow's discovery of how Kurtz has gained his position of power over the local people involves him in a radical questioning, not only of his own nature and values, but of those that underpin Western civilization itself.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143106586
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/28/2012
Series: Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition Series
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 86,819
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Joseph Conrad (originally Józef Teodor Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski) was born in the Ukraine in 1857 and grew up under Tsarist autocracy. In 1896 he settled in Kent, where he produced within fifteen years such modern classics as YouthHeart of DarknessLord JimTyphoonNostromoThe Secret Agent and Under Western Eyes. He continued to write until his death in 1924. Today Conrad is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of fiction in English—his third language.

Adam Hochschild is the author of seven books, including King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa and Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves. He teaches narrative writing at the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California at Berkeley.

Maya Jasanoff is the Coolidge Professor of History at Harvard. She is the author of the prize-winning Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture, and Conquest in the East, 1750–1850 (2005) and Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (2011), which received the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfi ction and the George Washington Book Prize, and The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World (2017). A 2013 Guggenheim Fellow, Jasanoff won the 2017 Windham-Campbell Prize for Nonfiction.

Timothy S. Hayes is an Instructor of English at Auburn University in Alabama. His research interests include narrative theory and the novel, particularly the works of Robert Louis Stevenson and Joseph Conrad.

Mike Mignola is an award-winning artist and writer. He is the creator of Hellboy, which has been adapted into two feature films by Guillermo del Toro. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

Date of Birth:

December 3, 1857

Date of Death:

August 3, 1924

Place of Birth:

Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia

Place of Death:

Bishopsbourne, Kent, England

Education:

Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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The Heart Of Darkness 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 75 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is probably one of the best novels I have read, and its place in the English canon is well deserved. I don't agree with the Achebe line of criticism. Even setting aside the question of Conrad's personal beliefs, which don't necessarily accord with Achebe's assesment, I think it's hard to argue that the book is anything but negative on the European, colonialist outlook. It is true that you could read and celebrate the brutality and dehumanization of the Africans herein, but to do that you would have to overlook a lot of the text. Obviously not at all coincidentally, it would be similar to but more willfully ignorant than people taking Apocalypse Now as a pro-war movie. On that note, I strongly look forward to the movie or book that, much like Coppola did for Vietnam, presents an explicit adaptation of this book to American brutality, exploitation, and imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. I think this book should be taught in more high schools so that more people are exposed to its commentary on those kinds of affronts.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A moral journey and an account of how lust for power overpowered one man's soul, heart of darkness is without a doubt one of the greatest stories ever written. Conrad has a command over words similar to Joyce, and some passages are so poetic they make you gasp. This is especially amazing considering English was his third language! Not only is it thought-provoking and meaningful as a parable, but it is also an absorbing read strictly as an adventure story. The most common complaint I've heard about this book is its wordiness. However, in my opinion no extraneous words are included, every one contributes to the nightmare-like atmosphere. If you want succinct writing that says nothing, give up and read Hemingway. If you can't understand this, you shouldn't be criticizing it. That said, this is a truly great book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I felt I was sitting across from Marlow, who is telling the story of his experience in the Congo. This novel is different from most in that it is written so that the reader is listening to someone's story related rather than the reader feeling s/he is there as the story happens. The style matches that of someone telling you his experience as you listen. This makes the style somewhat choppy and sometimes confusing as to who is speaking, the narrator or another character. Nonetheless, I found myself gripped by the tale. I read the book in one sitting.
lilyfathersjoy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Oh dear, I always feel so guilty when I don't care for a classic.I'm not sure how much difference there was between Joseph Conrad and his protagonist Marlow, but it is very difficult for my twenty-first century sensibility to get around the casual racism and misogynism which is further compounded by Marlow's unrelenting contempt for his fellow white men both in the Congo and in England. In fact, the only people he has any admiration for are Kurtz and Kurtz's "intended". We are told repeatedly about Kurtz's specialness, magnetism and great plans, but no details as to why this should be so, other than his talents as a musician, painter, and thinker. Furthermore, when Marlow meets Kurtz's fiancée, he waxes lyrically on her character and motives, all based only on a fleeting interview.There are some wonderful descriptive moments; I particularly liked the image of two station employees dragging their shadows behind them. Also, the ending, which I will not give away, has a certain poignancy. However, I have no plans to tackle this again.I should point out that this particular audio edition won awards, no doubt deserved. Otherwise, I might have loathed this book.
tulikangaroo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Deep, dark and moving. I don't understand the loathing of this book for a few reasons - first, we cannot hold books written 100+ years ago to today's relatively enlightened standards of race, etc. While it was unfair and needed to change, it did - and discounting what used to be a reality disparages the great strides that have been made. Second, to me, it is not black people that are portrayed as depraved in this novel - it's the white people who have dark, greedy souls. Fascinating book, glad I read it.
lit_chick on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
2005, Blackstone Audiobooks, Read by Frederick DavidsonHeart of Darkness, set in the early 1900s, is narrated by Marlow, a sailor who journeys to Africa under the employment of the Company, a Belgian outfit conducting trade in the Congo. Marlow¿s journey is a journey into ¿the horror¿ of imperialism. Natives of the Congo are brutalized by Company agents and forced into Company service; the resplendent natural resources of the country are raped for profit. In the heart of the Congo, Marlow meets Kurtz, a reputed Company Chief who represents humanity¿s capacity for evil.I think Conrad¿s accomplishment with Heart of Darkness is that he called imperialism so well. Whatever benefit proponents of imperialism might have professed, the fact of the matter is that one race invaded the country of another, brutalized and made criminals of its people, and pillaged all that could be had for profit. Conrad¿s style of writing is perfect for his subject; it is stark and frank, its images dark and grotesque.¿A slight clinking behind me made me turn my head. Six black men advanced in a file, toiling up the path. They walked erect, and slow, balancing small baskets full of earth on their heads ¿ and the clink kept time with their footsteps. Black rags were wrapped around their loins, and the short ends behind waggled to and fro like tails. I could see every rib; the joints in their limbs were like knots in a rope. Each had an iron collar on his neck, and all were connected together with a chain whose bights swung between them, rhythmically clinking ¿ but these men could by no stretch of imagination be called enemies. They were called criminals, and the outraged law, like the bursting shells, had come to them, an insoluble mystery from the sea. All their meagre breasts panted together, the violently dilated nostrils quivered, the eyes stared stonily uphill. They passed me within six inches, without a glance, with that complete, deathlike indifference of unhappy savages.¿ (1/4)
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Name -- Poppy. <br> Age -- Timeless. <br> Species -- A Chimaera from the I Am Number 4 series. <br> Gender -- Male. <br> Appearance -- He's a shapeshifter. So . . . I'll just describe him when necessary. <br> Persona -- He is very protective, and a tad insane. <br> Likes -- Clara. <p> I don't know what else to put, honestly.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Name: Dante Holimion (Diamonddew). Age: 32. Race: Dunmer (dark elf). Past family: Adran Holimion (dad, deceased), Althaea Holimion (mom, decesased), Bryn Holimion (sister, alive, lives in Skyrim), Rael Holimion (brother, alive, lives in Morrowind). Current family: Katrina Holimion (wife), Thia Holimion (daughter, wood elf), Skylar Holimion (son, high elf), Felony Holimion (daughter, dark elf). Looks: Jet black skin, red eyes, small ponytail, orcish armor. Powers: Shapeshifting into dragon named Morrowind. Personality: Get to know me. Other: Nien.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Name: Flora Lollipop <p> Age: 17 <p> Species: Human <p> Looks: Frizzy carmel hair. Green eyes. Always wears a purple shirt that says 'Live Life and Love Animals' <p> Crush: None <p> Height: 5'9 <p> Personality: Kind. Cannot hurt her feelings <p> Powers: None <p> Siggy: Fl0r &alpha L0llip0p <p> Anything else ask.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Name: learn to look at the headline.--- Age: 16--- Gender: girl--- Height: 4'7(about average)--- Weight: you dont ask a girl that!---- Looks: glossy waistlength black hair with red and green streaks. Green eyes with specks of gold. Roundsided heartshaped face. Small nose. Sparkly lip gloss. Mascara. Small waist. Nice hips and body.---Wears: tightfitted red tanktop. Black miniskirt. Black boots up to just below the knee. Always wears a ruby necklace around her throat. She found it and it seems to hold a mysterious power.---Personality/attitude: usually nice and friendly but can come up as snotty sometimes. Also brave, fair, noble, and willing.---Likes: her pet dragon, adventure, good hearts, food, and trying new things.--- Dislikes: evil hearts, seeing others hurt, and broccoli.--- Dragon: named Fusion. He is a beautiful red dragon with an orange belly and chest. He follows Everly around and loves her dearly. He will also protect her with his life. He is loyal to her. He is a fire breed type dragon.--- Other identities: pokemon girl, Topaz, and Rebecca.---Other: JUST ASK ON ANY OTHER RESULT.-------------
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
And somebody waking up does not destroy somebody else!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Name :: Lieutenant Buttface<p>Gender :: walrus flavored potatoe<p>Age :: 400[looks to be about 17]<p>Species :: elf<p>Height :: about 4'3<p>Looks :: long copper hair that is slightly curly. It reaches her waist. She has sharp green eyes and, like all elves, pointed ears. She is odly short for her age. She always wears a tight fitting black leather jumpsuit and knee-high tight fitting black boots<p>Crush :: none...<p>Dragon-crush[the dragon she wants to have a bond with] :: Saphira<p>Weapons :: a bow that when she pulls back the string, an elemental arrow materializes on the string, a long curved blade, and a water gun[jk]. She has a small dagger hidden in her jumpsuit<p>Personality :: wary, kind and gentle, very fiery temper if you threaten her friends or family, quiet and shy sometimes<p>Parents :: Ariana Silverblade[mother, dead], James Silverblade[father, dead], Thomas Silverblade[brother, dead], and Selena Silverblade[sister, alive]<p>Likes :: being with friends and family, sometimes being alone, reading, singing<p>Dislikes :: timber wolves, most dragons[bad experiences]<p>Special Powers :: nature, shapeshifting[when threatened or angry], and ice<p>History :: when Katrina was only 3, a large group of dragons attacked her village. They killed her whole family except her brother and sister. She an her siblings escaped from the flames and hid in a nearby forest. The dragons kiled everyone in the village. The siblings cared for eachother. They survived for a while. Then, when Katrina was only 13, she and her siblings were out hunting. She and her sister heard a scream. They recognized it as their brother, Thomas. They met up with each other and went out looking for him. They came into a clearing and found him lying on a bed of moss, surrounded by a pool if blood<p>Other :: ask<p>Siggy :: &#9830KatriNa&#9830<p>|__KatRiNa__|
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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This wad okay Not as good as id hoped it would be, but you cant like them all
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The reading feint of heart that is. If you can't get through the first two chapters of this, you will never read the book. It also takes the ability to visualize beyond the words, read between the lines and place yourself back in the late 1890's with its style of writing and the age they lived in. All that being said, this is a tremendous work, well worth the effort. And of course, once you've read it, you will see where Francis Ford Coppola got his inspiration from for Apocalypse Now.
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