The Heir (Ravenscar Series #2)

The Heir (Ravenscar Series #2)

by Barbara Taylor Bradford

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312354688
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 07/01/2008
Series: Ravenscar Series , #2
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 560
Product dimensions: 4.30(w) x 6.68(h) x 1.19(d)

About the Author

Barbara Taylor Bradford is the author of 25 bestselling novels, including Playing the Game, Breaking the Rules, and The Ravenscar Dynasty. She was born in Leeds, England, and from an early age, she was a voracious reader: at age 12, she had already read all of Dickens and the Brontë sisters. By the age of twenty, she was an editor and columnist on Fleet Street. She published her first novel, A Woman of Substance, in 1979, and it has become an enduring bestseller.

Barbara Taylor Bradford's books are published in over 90 countries in 40 languages, with sales figures in excess of 82 million. Ten of her novels have been adapted into television mini-series starring actors including Sir Anthony Hopkins, Liam Neeson, Deborah Kerr and Elizabeth Hurley. She has been inducted into the Writers Hall of Fame of America, and in June of 2007, Barbara was awarded an OBE (Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II for her contributions to Literature.

She lives in New York City with her husband, television producer Robert Bradford, to whom all her novels are dedicated, and their Bichon Frise dogs, who sit under her desk while she writes.

Hometown:

New York, New York

Place of Birth:

Yorkshire, England

Education:

Christ Church Elementary School and Northcote Private School for Girls in Yorkshire, England

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The Heir 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
MargaretdeBuhr on LibraryThing 28 days ago
Couldn't even finish reading it - I though I liked her writing but this was boring!!!!
JennyMcb on LibraryThing 28 days ago
One of the worst books that I have ever read. The only reason I kept going was because I thought there had to be some conflict, a story line or even some ends tied up. It was a throw away, I just couldn't see myself sharing the book with anyone. It was just one bad thing after another with characters dying all the time and you never find out who was the antagonist.I was surprised considering other books by Bradford are books that I have enjoyed.
Pam1960ca on LibraryThing 28 days ago
I'm a bit of a fan of Barbara Taylor Bradford's books but this book just didn't do it for me. Very repetitive - repeatedly through the book she recaps so much of what has already happened or reminds you that Grace is the granddaughter of Cecily - she tells us this several times in the book., etc. It gets annoying - it's like she doesn't think the reader will remember from page to page what has happened. Reminded me very much of the way Danielle Steel writes. Not impressed.
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It is amazing how Barbara Taylor Bradford creates a story! At first it was a little difficult keeping the characters straight and following the family lines, but once you get absorbed in the story, it becomes clear. The story itself has everything - romance, family jealousies, tragedy, and a taste of business "politics." I was a little disappointed in the ending and how we found out the final "heir".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As the second part of a trilogy, this volume was entertaining but not as full-bodied and well plotted as the first. Short shift was made of several of the people and plot lines that made one feel slightly cheated. Overall, it is an OK read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found the book a little slow in the begining, but I did not read the first book. About half way into the book I really started to enjoy reading it but then the main character died and I lost a little interest. I know have the first book and will read it before summer's end.
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NoMoSno More than 1 year ago
Not being British, I did not realize that the Ravenscar Dynasty was nothing but a fictionalized version of the War of the Roses. Even the first names of the characters remained the same in most cases. It was not until I got to the end of The Heir and saw the transparent fictional account of Henry VIII, his wives and daughter, Elizabeth, that I went back and did some research. Not being a quitter (or perhaps I'm a glutton for punishment), I am now reading Being Elizabeth, the final book in the trilogy. Although I have only just started it, it is easy to see that the history lesson continues. It is again a thinly veiled biography of Elizabeth I. I am deeply disappointed in Barbara Taylor Bradford, who created such wonderful characters in the Emma Harte series. Or, perhaps we should study history further to see if those characters were not really her creation either.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although I enjoy reading Ms. Bradford's books, I felt like I had read this before. I kept wondering if they just changed the cover. I usually find her books to be good for my summer reading list and I picked this one up off of the discount table and I am glad I did not pay full price for this one. There was not any WOW to it for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read all of Barbara Taylor Bradford's books and have enjoyed all of them. This book left me very disappointed though. I thoroughly enjoyed the first part of the book but then at the end we were suddenly in 1970 with characters we did not know. I thought that was a very disappointing way to end this book. Alot of questions were not answered and we were left wondering just what happened.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I listened to The Heir, not realizing that it was a second installment in a series. As a stand-alone story, there were too many unanswered storylines - what happened to the two sons who disappeared, what about a number of suspicious deaths, what ever happened to Edward's lover, Ann, etc. The story jumps from the 1920s to the 1970s--for me, there are just too many open issues.
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
After his splendid performance of the audio edition of The Ravenscar Dynasty who else to give voice to the second in Bradford's trilogy than British actor and playwright John Lee? His delivery is again impeccable as he successfully brings to life a large cast of characters. His voice is deep with a slight British accent - all the better to read these roles with. Listeners who have felt withdrawal symptoms without a Bradford saga to lose themselves in have shown they're delighted with the trials and tribulations, maladies and machinations of the Deravenel family. Bradford is deft at plotting stories of multi generational families and The Heir is not an exception as the now 33-year-old Edward Deravenel struggles to hold his company together in the midst of an influenza epidemic, and the plotting of brother George. As if this were not enough, he finds no solace or comfort in the arms of his wife Elizabeth. While Bradford's storyline is unsurprising, it's pure magic for many. - Gail Cooke
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was a great fan of the Emma Harte saga until the final book (Just Rewards) That book was so shallow it was amazing. The Heir is the first of this saga I have read and it started out wonderfully - not up to the par of the Harte books but good. Then we reached the end chapters and my god how gross. To tell you the truth if she was aiming for comedy it was a comedic tour de force. If not she should stop writing until she gets fresh material. To make it parallel the life of Henry the VII is just too funny. Puleze after the Harte books we expect better of you.