Her Father's House

Her Father's House

by Belva Plain
3.3 9

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Her Father's House 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The plot was far-fetched to say the least. The dialoge was totally unbelievable and dated (in the late 1980's she refers to flourescent lights as 'electric lights'). This is perhaps the worst book I have ever read. I could not have cared less what happened to the characters and in the end I was just thankful it was over.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story flew by so fast, I did not have time to get to know the characters because with every turn of the page, a year or so had passed. Ms. Plain had enough material for a series with all she packed into this fast little read. Too many stereotypes: Maria, the nanny (honestly, not all Mexican women are named Maria and not all of them can't speak English very well) and Lillian (not all socialites do the whole charity bit). It was all more like a Harlequin romance (thankfully, without all the explicit sex scenes). The ending was very weak and not believable at all. I am a freelance writer and I can tell you, there was entirely too much telling in this book and not enough showing and there was not one sentence in the entire novel that is worth quoting, that is either beautiful or profound. I feel about this book like I felt about 'The Thorn Birds' by Colleen McCullough. I did not care any more about the characters at the end of the book than I did at the beginning. At least I can say I found Donald and Kate very likeable, though I hardly knew them. Laura seemed to have no personality. It is amazing what sells anymore. Take Nicholas Sparks. The Notebook and A Walk To Remember were good reads, not great literature by any means, but they were very character-driven novels (even if the author's credibilty was greatly reduced when he started talking about Baptists baptizing babies--that is Catholicism). His books have been getting worse and worse. Nights in Rodanthe was bad, but I couldn't even get through The Wedding. He just seems to be using his name, notariety and boyish good looks to sell books. But, what can I say? As long as people keep buying them, authors like Nicholas Sparks will keep turing out third-rate work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have discovered a new category of writers whose work I am falling in love with: writers who understand the human heart and capture it with simplicity. I first found Kirk Martin through Shade of the Maple, absolutely extraordinary, now Belva Plain. She writes with rare emotional power in this intriguing, beautiful and sometimes haunting novel. Both novels are about choices, and the power they have in our lives. Highly recommended!
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1968 Rising New York attorney Donald Wolfe meets, dates, and marries Lillian Morris. However, happily ever after fails to materialize and they quickly part but not before she becomes pregnant. Lillian remarries and Donald sees their child Bettina once a week. During his visits Tina¿s nanny accompanies the little girl. The nanny informs Donald that Lillian ignores their daughter while planning to carry her with her as excess baggage when she visits her latest lover. Unable to sit on the sidelines, Donald abducts his beloved Tina and vanishes with her.

Years later Tina is getting married. She travels to New York where she soon learns more about her matriarchal background. Tina is pulled in two directions, as she knows her father lied about her past, but risked all to provide her a safe nurturing environment.

HER FATHER¿S HOUSE is a complex cerebral father-daughter relationship tale. The story line forces the reader to ponder how far does one go to protect a loved one including hiding the truth from them? That question leads to other philosophical issues such as does the means (hiding the truth and the abduction though risking everything) justify the end (an adjusted adult), when do you make that decision, and how do you knows its right in a world of multi-hued grays? Belva Plain leaves her fans to cogitate on this deep novel and what brilliant rabbit will she pull out of her magic word processor next.

Harriet Klausner