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Hiccup Snickup
     

Hiccup Snickup

by Melinda Long, Thor Wickstrom (Illustrator)
 
How do you cure the hiccups? Do you drink water from the wrong side of the glass? Do you hold your breath while eating an apple, or do you put a paper bag over your head and stand upside down? What if nothing you do seems to work and the hiccups have gotten completely out of control?

Hiccup Snickup is the story of one little girl's quest to cure the hiccups.

Overview

How do you cure the hiccups? Do you drink water from the wrong side of the glass? Do you hold your breath while eating an apple, or do you put a paper bag over your head and stand upside down? What if nothing you do seems to work and the hiccups have gotten completely out of control?

Hiccup Snickup is the story of one little girl's quest to cure the hiccups. The whole family offers advice, with hilarious results. But it is only when Grandma explains an old family hiccup antidote, and the entire family works together, that those pesky hiccups finally go away -- or do they?

Madcap illustrations by Thor Wickstrom perfectly complement this rollicking tale, making it just right for reading aloud.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this giddy, cumulative tale, a hiccuping girl turns to each member of her family for a cure. Her brother shouts, "Boo!," and her sister recommends drinking water "from the wrong side of a cup." Nothing works. "So there I was, scared to death, in a wet shirt, wearing a paper bag...," says the disappointed narrator, interrupted by a sudden "Hic!" Such a silly condition calls for an equally outlandish antidote, a tongue-twister provided by the girl's grandmother: "Hiccup snickup/ Rear right straight up./ Three drops in the teacup/ Will cure the hiccups." Grandma, an unconventional sort in a backward baseball cap, mimes the nonsense words (sticking her "rear right straight up" in a hilarious way), and then the whole family performs the rhyme, three times fast. Long (When Papa Snores) keeps the first-person narration short and snappy, and voice-bubble dialogue maintains the boisterous pace. Wickstrom (The Big Night Out) gives the gangly, noodle-armed characters lots of goofy personality: the girl's mother sports a spiky New Wave hairdo, the sister prefers flower-child braids and the brothers dress as a pirate and a doctor. By the end of the book the afflicted girl has recovered, but everyone else is gasping, "Hic!" This ridiculous remedy is a must for the medicine cabinet. Ages 5-9. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Most kids have had the hiccups at one time or another, and many of them know how annoying these little "hics" can be. In this rollicking tale, a young girl comes down with a serious case of the hiccups and tries everything to make them disappear. She gets outrageous advice from different members of her family—Grandma tells her to say "Hiccup snickup rear right straight up; three drops in the teacup will cure the hiccups" three times fast, her mother informs her to put a paper bag over her head and eat an apple at the same time, her sister shows her how to drink water out of the wrong side of the glass, her young brother uses the ever-popular scare tactic, and her older brother invites her to hold her breath and stand on her head. Needless to say, none of these tricks work. It is not until her entire family gathers in the kitchen and follows her Grandma's zany song and dance, that her hiccups are banished once and for all. However, when her pesky hiccups finally cease, she finds herself surrounded by a roomful of stunned, hiccupping family members. Young readers will enjoy this rib-tickling, cumulative picture book, which contains hilarious illustrations, lively language and a surprise ending. This is a perfect selection for story time or anytime. Kids will quickly memorize the catchy phrase and sing it the next time they are bothered by menacing hiccups. Don't miss this whimsical, wild romp. 2001, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, . Ages 5 to 9. Reviewer: Debra Briatico
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-A girl with a stubborn case of hiccups takes Grandma's advice: say, "Hiccup snickup/Rear right straight up/Three drops in the teacup/Will cure the hiccups." It doesn't work at first, though, so the child asks her mother (try a paper bag over your head while eating an apple), sister (try drinking water out of the wrong side of a cup), her brothers, and Dad. The remedies are layered on in a manner reminiscent of a cumulative folk tale, which will tickle young listeners' sense of the ridiculous. Grandma's rhyme will also lend itself to storytime use with suitably silly participation. Meanwhile, Wickstrom's paintings add flair and comedy to the overall effect. Grandma herself is especially wonderful, with a backward baseball cap, arms and legs like noodles, and high-heeled green boots. While not an essential purchase, it is fun.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689822452
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
03/01/1901
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.18(w) x 8.82(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
290L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

MELINDA LONG is a teacher and the author of the award-winning bestseller How I Became a Pirate. She lives in Greenville, South Carolina.

DAVID SHANNON is the illustrator of many successful picture books, including How I Became a Pirate. His numerous awards include a Caldecott Honor for No, David! He lives in Burbank, California.

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