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High Achiever: The Incredible True Story of One Addict's Double Life

High Achiever: The Incredible True Story of One Addict's Double Life

by Tiffany Jenkins

Paperback

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Available for Pre-Order. This item will be available on June 18, 2019

Overview

Beloved for her complete authenticity, raw honesty, and lovable humor, Tiffany Jenkins is the human voice of the opioid epidemic. This is her gripping true story, from her life as an addict, 20 felony charges, and six months in a Florida prison to her eventual sobriety and new life as a mom, wife, and inspiration to millions.

A few years ago, Tiffany Jenkins (maiden name Johnson) was detoxing behind bars at a Florida prison, incarcerated on 20 felony charges. Now, she's clean and sober, a married mother of three. As she found her way in her new life, she started sharing on social media as an outlet for her depression and anxiety. She struck a chord, several of her videos went viral (one with 46million views), and in the past year her following exploded from a few hundred thousand to more than 3 million.

Raw and juicy, compulsively readable and ultimately inspirational, the memoir opens in the Florida women's prison where Tiffany was incarcerated for 180 days. The memoir flashes back in time to the events that led to Tiffany's imprisonment (during the time of her active addiction, Tiffany was dating and living with a cop), and moves forward to her eventual sobriety.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780593135938
Publisher: Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale
Publication date: 06/18/2019
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 29,251
Product dimensions: 5.14(w) x 7.96(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Tiffany Jenkins writes about motherhood, addiction, marriage, and life on her blog, Juggling the Jenkins, where she has acquired a huge social media following. Her videos receive millions of views. She uses her platform to help and inspire others who are struggling with motherhood, mental health, addiction, and those who just need a good laugh. Her articles have been featured on BLUNTmoms.com, Themighty.com and Thoughtcatalog.com, and her Blog and Facebook page have been covered on several news outlets and television programs. She is currently on a 40-city tour where she speaks about addiction and recovery. She lives with her husband and three children in Sarasota, Florida.

Read an Excerpt

1

“One, two, three.”

The light from the flash was blinding. I’d been ordered to remove my glasses for the picture, and I could see nothing for a moment. I hadn’t washed my hair in three days, and since I was arrested directly from my bed, where I’d been sleeping, the mugshot about to be plastered all over the papers and the local news broadcasts was most likely just as horrendous as the crimes that started the whole ordeal.

“I am going to uncuff you, briefly, so that you can remove your jewelry and place it in this bag. Once you do that, you will head to that holding cell right there,” the officer said, pointing. “And change out of your clothes. You look to be a large, so here, take these,” she said, handing me a polyester jumpsuit. She reached into a nearby bin and pulled out a pair of rubber flip-­flops.

“These are your new shoes. You will wear them at all times—­including when you take a shower. Don’t lose them.” She thrust the shoes into my already full hands and nudged me toward the cell. I tried my best not to think about all the different feet that had already worn these rubber shoes, but, despite my best efforts, I was haunted by the thought of how many different species of bacteria would soon be inhabiting my toes.

I jumped when the metal door slammed behind me. The room was dark and the acidic smell of urine was overwhelming. I held my breath and quickly stripped off my clothes before slipping into the jumpsuit. It felt like I was wearing cardboard. The female deputy had been observing me through the window and opened the door once I was dressed.

“Put your stuff in here.” She held out a brown paper bag and I stared at my belongings as I dropped them in. My heart sank as she folded up the bag and handed it to another deputy. My clothes were no longer my own; they belonged to the county now. “C’mon, you gotta see the nurse for some blood work and a pregnancy test.” For a moment, I secretly prayed I was pregnant. Maybe then they would let me go home.

Home. I wasn’t even sure where that was anymore. I certainly couldn’t go back to where I was living. In fact, by now, my belongings were most likely packed and sitting outside.

As I sat down on the cold metal chair across from the nurse, I suddenly realized how shitty I felt, physically. The chair was freezing, yet somehow I was sweating. My bones began aching and my eyes watered uncontrollably. I was sick.

“Okay, Missss . . . Johnson. I’m going to do a couple of tests, but first I’d like to ask you a series of questions,” she said, grabbing a nearby clipboard.

“Name?”

“Tiffany Johnson.”

“Age?”

“Twenty-­seven.”

“Weight?”

“Gah. Like one-­sixty, I think?”

“Currently taking any medication?”

I hesitated. She glanced up at me and repeated the question. “Are you currently taking any medication? Yes or no.”

“Yes.”

“What medication?”

I took a deep breath, and began. “Dilaudid, Roxicodone, Oxycontin, Xanax, Percocet, Lortab, Vicodin, and marijuana. I’m not sure if that last one counts as medication but—­”

“Okay. And would you describe the crimes you have been charged with as ‘shocking in nature’?”

“Yes. Yes, I would.”

She looked up at me over the rim of her glasses as she set her pen down and leaned back in her seat. “Okay, I don’t usually do this, but you have piqued my interest. Would you mind telling me why you consider your crimes to be shocking in nature?”

As I proceeded to tell her what happened, I watched her expression morph from confusion, to shock, to disgust, then back to confusion as she leaned forward to check something off on her clipboard. “Okay, yes, I would say that counts as shocking in nature, definitely,” she said, attempting to regain focus.

She cleared her throat and nervously glanced up at me as she made some notes. “All right, since you are obviously going to be experiencing a severe withdrawal from opiates, we are going to keep you in Medical for a few days before bringing you to the general population. There we will be able to monitor you to make sure you have a safe detox. I am just going to quickly get a few samples from you and then they will take you down.”

I watched intently as she prepared her syringe, and my stomach doubled over on itself at the sight. My palms began to perspire and suddenly I felt as if I might explode. My skin crawled and my legs were restless. It had only been about twenty hours since I’d last gotten high and I already felt like shit. This was going to f***ing suck.