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High Literacy and Ethnic Identity
     

High Literacy and Ethnic Identity

by Dulce Maria Gray
 

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High Literacy and Ethnic Identity describes the experiences of fifteen men and women who arrived with the first and second wave of immigrants from the Dominican Republic to the United States and who, despite the odds, succeeded in completing the highest level of formal education-a doctorate-and are now educators in US colleges and universities. Examining these

Overview

High Literacy and Ethnic Identity describes the experiences of fifteen men and women who arrived with the first and second wave of immigrants from the Dominican Republic to the United States and who, despite the odds, succeeded in completing the highest level of formal education-a doctorate-and are now educators in US colleges and universities. Examining these cultural narratives reveals much about the complex symbiosis between becoming highly literate and (re)constructing an ethnic identity; it elucidates the realities of an increasingly visible group who are using formal education to step out of the margins of society; it sorts out what it means to be a literate "other" American. These insights can be useful to scholars of Dominican/Latino/a Studies, all teachers of Composition and Literacy, and the general reader, particularly those interested in understanding the conditions that help new immigrants to thrive, and those invested in reshaping institutions of learning.

Author Biography: Dulce M. Gray has been teaching cultural studies, writing and Latina/o literature for fifteen years at universities in the Mid West, East Coast and Mid Atlantic regions. She is now working on a collection of essays on the relationship between travel and the making of a diasporic self-identity.

Editorial Reviews

Choice
Highly recommended for its contents and lyrical writing style.
Rei Berroa
Dulce Gray's well-written and documented book is a revealing study into autoethnography. The author takes the reader from deconstructing writing to reconstructing memory, thus giving voice not just to the Dominican or Latina experience in the U.S., but to all immigrants in their search for cultural identity.
Silvio Torres-Saillant
I know of no other study that so lucidly and eloquently explores the link between high literacy and the configuration of identity for Americans of Dominican descent as well as for any U.S. minority community of recent immigrant background. Dulce Maria Gray here successfully applies autoethnographic scholarship to enhance our understanding of the forces that facilitate or hinder access to a sense of belonging in the sphere of Americanness. She does an impressive job of tracing her own intellectual growth from grade school to her present academic position, while at the same time drawing from the existing bibliography in her field to shed light on the lives of entire communities.
Victor Villanueva
As a kid, I had a friend, Juan Moreno. Mami would say "Es Dominicano." There was a meaning to that. I didn't understand. When my daughter read Julia Alvarez, I looked for other Dominican writers in English. There were none, according to the library's search engine. With this book, I discovered the other Latina of the Caribbean, la Domincana and el Domincano, in all their richness. And in the process, I learned more on how we‹Latinos or Latinas of the Caribbean‹succeed in a world that colors us.
CHOICE
Highly recommended for its contents and lyrical writing style.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780742500051
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
02/01/2002
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.82(w) x 8.96(h) x 0.54(d)

Meet the Author

Dulce M. Gray has been teaching cultural studies, writing and Latina/o literature for fifteen years at universities in the Mid West, East Coast and Mid Atlantic regions. She is now working on a collection of essays on the relationship between travel and the making of a diasporic self-identity.

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