The Hijab Boutique

The Hijab Boutique

by Michelle Khan

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Overview

" The Hijab Boutique is a wonderful book that will appeal to young readers age 10 and up. Black and white illustrations add to the message's impact. One of the striking attributes of The Hijab Boutique is its sensitive treatment of the topic of respecting cultural differences, and rethinking automatic responses." — The Midwest Book Review

"Michelle Khan's first children's book, The Hijab Boutique , is a quick read with a deep and resounding message... I’m excited to have such a simple yet profound story to share with my nieces, and any other girl who cares to read and learn a meaningful lesson about inner strength, faith, and womanhood through another’s eyes." — Luxury Reading

Farah enjoyed her private girls' school and fun with her friends. Then an assignment meant she had to talk about her mother for "International Woman's Day" in front of the whole class. Compared to her friends' glamorous actress, make-up artist, and tap-dancing mothers, what can her modest mother possibly have that is worth sharing with her classmates? To Farah's surprise, her mother was quite the business woman before putting her career on hold to care for her daughter.

Michelle Khan is an award-winning Indian Canadian writer. She started her career at a University of Toronto student paper, and eventually her words hit daily newspaper pages. For six years, Michelle wrote an internationally syndicated youth advice column. Her work led her to win a $5,000 scholarship from book publisher Harlequin Enterprises Ltd. She went onto earn a $15,000 award from Global Television Network. Michelle lives in Toronto, Canada, with her parents and younger sister. This is her first chapter book for kids.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780860374688
Publisher: Kube Publishing Ltd
Publication date: 08/23/2011
Pages: 56
Sales rank: 1,223,004
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.25(h) x (d)
Age Range: 8 Years

About the Author

Michelle Khan is an award-winning Indian-Canadian writer. She got her start at a University of Toronto student paper, and eventually her words hit daily newspaper pages. For six years, Michelle wrote an internationally syndicated youth advice column. Her work led her to win a $5,000 scholarship from book publisher Harlequin Enterprises Ltd. She went onto to earn a $15,000 award from Global Television Network. Michelle lives in Toronto with her parents and younger sister. This is her first chapter book for kids.

Table of Contents

1. Miss Peaboy's Academy and the impossible school assignment
2. Me, the invisible girl?
3. My mother's secret life
4. Dreams, ambitions and the Hijab Boutique
5. Hijabs in the spotlight
6. Conclusion

Customer Reviews

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The Hijab Boutique 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
lostbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I gave this book to my daughter to read, she is nine. Here is what she said about it: "It made me understand what it would feel like if my family was different from the families around me. I like how the main character handled being different."
ALoyacano on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story behind this book is a good one to introduce to young readers. My students are not often exposed to stories from different cultures. The reading level is low enough to use with most students. The phrasing can be a bit awkward for some students, but it is helpful to make the connection other foriegn languages and cultures that they may be more familiar with.
ChristianR on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a little too earnest for me -- although the voice is supposed to be a young girl, it sounds like an adult writing like a child. Good try.
thelittlebookworm on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Farah has been assigned a project about her mother for International Woman's Day. The problem is that Farah thinks her mother is boring, much more so than the other moms of her classmates. As Farah struggles to find something to bring to class, she learns more about her mother.Well, this was a cute book. The language was very simple and it read like a 10 year old wrote it. In fact it brought memories back of my 5th grade journal. It was funny that Farah thought her mom was so boring and couldn't think of anything interesting about her. Very typical. But the lessons is really that it's hard to know who your mother is outside of your relationship. And Farah really knew very little about her mother. So I enjoyed Farah's discoveries of her mother's past. And I liked the explanation of why her mother choose to wear the hijab and all the different styles of hijab. It made the story different than my usual reading fare.
red_dianthus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When I read the book description I had high hopes for this book, however I was disappointed by one dimensional characters and a heavy handed plot which framed the real purpose of the book. This book was only written to educate about the Hijab. It does provide some interesting information but in such a ham-fisted way that I would have preferred a small pamphlet of hijab information and not having to read the rest of the book. I doubt it would really appeal to the target demographic, as the main character is not interesting enough to make you care about her and the ending would feel contrived to even young girls in elementary school.
_Lily_ on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Hijab Boutique by Michelle KhanReviewed by Moirae the fates book reviewsFarah enjoyed her private girls' school and fun with her friends. Then an assignment meant she had to talk about her mother for "International Woman's Day" in front of the whole class. Compared to her friends' glamorous actress, make-up artist, and tap-dancing mothers, what can her modest mother possibly have that is worth sharing with her classmates? To Farah's surprise, her mother was quite the business woman before putting her career on hold to care for her daughter. (Synopsis provided by goodreads)This is a middle grade book.I enjoyed reading this book, the author describes different types of Hijabs that are worn in different areas of the world. (I had no idea there were so many different kinds!) The author does a wonderful job in explaining why Muslim women wear the Hijab, it's explained in a way that people who are unfamiliar with it, or only hear what the media tells them, can get a different perspective. The book is very short only 56 pages, has wonderful illustrations and the whole point is about informing people of the real reason for the Hijab and not to make judgments on it based on the media and historical events. The main message children and adults alike can take from this story is acceptance, accepting those around us who are different. Very cute, fun, informative and enjoyable read. * Paperback: 56 pages * Publisher: The Islamic Foundation (August 23, 2011) * Author: Michelle Khan * Cover Art: I liked the simplicity of it. * Over all rating **** out of 5 stars * Obtained: Librarything Early reviewers
cinnamonowl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I am very excitedly going to add this to our school library collection. The area I live in actually has a large Muslim population, and every year we are enrolling more and more Muslim children into our school, whose mothers dress traditionally, in a hijab. I like this book because it is explains in a very understandable way, about how and why the women in the Muslim faith choose to wear the hijab. The author explains that for every woman the reason is different, and lists many different reasons. I learned new things myself, reading this book, and I think it will be a welcome addition for our students to read. We do not have many other fiction books at this time that deal with this subject matter, and this book does so in a positive, easy manner.
LauraMoore on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When Farah is asked to complete an assignment at her all-girls art school for International Womans Day, Farah is less then pleased when she learns she needs to bring in an item that represents her mother. Farah's hijab-wearing, modest mother is nothing like her classmates mothers, so what can she bring?This was a cute but very short chapter book that has an overall good message that differences are what make us interesting and unique and not what isolate us or make us strange. It was a book that I think is important to make the younger generations (Which this book is geared towards) be more culturally-aware of other cultures, religions, and social groups. This book wasn't exactally what I had in mind, but regardless i'm glad that I was able to read it.
deslivres5 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Lovely, empowering book geared towards tween girls. The story is narrated by Farah, a fifth grade Muslim girl from Los Angeles. She lives with her religious, widowed mother who she regards as a bit boring compared to her classmates' mothers. A school project for International Women's Day sets Farah on a path to finding out more about her mother. The narration gives the reader a glimpse into one Muslim's woman's life with respect to her religion in general and the wearing of hijab in particular.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is so great ive been looking for it a long time! :)