The Hindi-Bindi Club

The Hindi-Bindi Club

by Monica Pradhan
4.7 19

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Hindi-Bindi Club 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
LM02 More than 1 year ago
Being able to see the different view points of the previous and current generation is a plus and something both generations can appreciate and understand each other.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was wonderful and beautifully described both the cultural aspects of the Indians and the clash it makes with American societies (I would know being the child of Indian parents that immigrated to Alaska). I sat there in my parents bedroom reading it and throwing out quotes from the book, making them laugh, but while it has its comedic moments, it also has a depth and seriousness that compel you to keep reading until its done! Plus, it comes with some delicious recipes that are tempting enough for anyone to try!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
great blending of old school and new school. Loved it
pinklotus More than 1 year ago
A fantastic read! 'The Hindi-Bindi Club' was smartly written and engaging, and had the perfect balance of humor, emotion, and even spirituality. I enjoyed all of the plot threads, but I especially loved the chapters set in India. I am Indian-American, and I appreciated learning even more about my heritage. Monica Pradhan did an incredible job with this book! I thank her for sharing such a wonderful story with the world.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
You will be amazed by the parallels particularly if you are a NRI, non resident Indian or an American born Indian. Our parents and grandparents are amazingly wise in so many areas that are new and unknown to them. This book reveals this wisdom along with the strong cultural values in an inviting and understanding way. Once we are adults ourselves, we can fully appreciate and embrace their wisdom. What is the saying in America, 'hind sight is 20/20'
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like to read books about Indian women and culture and this book was outstanding. I thought that character's different perspectives were well-written. The recipes are all interesting as well and I can't wait to try them. I am looking forward to reading more books from this author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Hindi-Bindi Club is an evocative story of three young first-generation Indian-American women who enjoy the freedom of American life but are also bound by their Indian heritage. This is a novel about identity, assimilation, cultural and family values. The author, Monica Pradhan is skillfully blending ancient Indian traditions of pronouncements from horoscopes, arranged marriages and family rituals with the modern American mythology that you make your own life and your own future. Busy professionals, Kiran, Preity and Rani go home to Washington D.C. for the holidays to their mothers, whom they lovingly refer to as the Hindi-Bindi Club. The young women are looking forward to a season of good food, laughter, arguments and gossip but they leave with so much more: reconciliation between generations and also between Indian traditions and the American dream. Kiran, Preity and Rani, who are childhood friends, break out of old Indian conventions in order to fulfil their ambitions and create the life they envision for themselves. However, when the crunch comes where else would they go for comfort and advice than back to their mothers? These young women live a hyphenated life, being Indian-American, exploring who they really are. They are successful by American standards but are considered a success by their Indian-born mothers? This question forms the core of the story and the resolutions to problems, which emerge in great numbers between the older and the younger generation of women, leave the protagonists and us, the readers with the fuzzy warm feeling of mutual understanding and respect between mothers and daughters. I enjoyed immersing myself in the rich cultural context and the warm spirituality of Indian women this debut novel offers. Fantastic recipes spice up the story, making The Hindi-Bindi Club the prefect book for body, mind and spirit. This is a well-written, intelligent, witty and funny, insightful and memorable novel. Monica Pradhan is a charismatic young writer I will definitely watch in the future. I can hardly wait to read her sequel The Bangle Bazaar to The Hindi-Bindi Club, which is scheduled for release in the summer of 2009.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After the first couple of chapters I wasn't sure I should continue the book--I didn't quite like the style in which the first generation's perspective was written, but I quickly became engrossed in this novel, touched by the delightful imagery that the words conjured up--memories described on paper of Partition, the sights and sounds of Kolkata, and a distant lover in Goa all came to life through Pradhan's novel. Haven't tried the recipes yet, I'm sure they'll be great though!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to admit to being skeptical about this book: I'm a male Indo-American writer, and I usually don't reach for what could be considered women's fiction. But after seeing Monica Pradhan speak at a local South Asian literary festival, I bought a copy. And couldn't put it down. HBC is a very fast read with just the right balance of drama, humor, culture, and insight, like a spiced-right curry. Much of the characters' journeys is internal, but Pradhan's skill with words and her ability to juggle multiple intertwined storylines kept me engaged. As an added bonus, this was the first book I've read that includes Marathi, the language I grew up speaking. Side note: the recipes are tempting enough to make this total non-cook consider trying them. Good reading and good food. Can't go wrong with that combination.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Thirty-two years old family doctor Kiran Deshpande recently has had doubts about her American dream as a second generation from India. She divorced her non-Indian musician and returned to her parents¿ home in Potomac, Maryland wondering if her mother's way of meeting a spouse through an arrangement is better as they remain together while she who had choices is single. --- In the DC suburb Kiran sees her childhood friends Preity Chawla Lindstrom and Rani McGuiness Tomashot they form a freindship similar to that of their mothers, the original members of THE HINDI-BINDI CLUB, who emigrated from India in the 1960s to eventually live in this Maryland town. The younger trio begins sharing confidences while Kiran begins her plan for a traditional Indian arranged marriage. By becoming closer to each other, they actually get closer to their respective mothers as none of the threesome any longer scorns the first generation with their old country ideas. --- This interesting story line uses stereotypes (including the mothers and daughters) to tell the tale of dramatic change that occurs between the immigrant generation and the first American with a dash generation. The story line focuses on the changes in outlook of the younger trio as they turn from scorn to respect for their elders who struggled with racism. Readers who appreciate a deep spotlight on generational America will enjoy this look at Indian-Americans whose difference can be summed over the dash. --- Harriet Klausner