×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Hiromi's Hands
     

Hiromi's Hands

by Lynne Barasch
 

See All Formats & Editions

The true story of Hiromi Suzuki, a Japanese American girl who defied tradition to train at her family's restaurant, and who became one of the first female sushi chefs in New York.

Overview

The true story of Hiromi Suzuki, a Japanese American girl who defied tradition to train at her family's restaurant, and who became one of the first female sushi chefs in New York.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
This is a true story of the daughter of a Japanese sushi chef who becomes one of the first female sushi chefs in New York City. Hiromi describes how her father came to New York from Tokyo and eventually opened his own restaurant. Hiromi became interested in her father's work and in spite of the Japanese all?male sushi chef tradition, began to help at the restaurant after school and on weekends where she learned to make every type of sushi. Names, ingredients, and a small illustration of the same are shown on two pages. The Author's Note tells of her friendship with Hiromi Suzuki and her family and a brief history of the development of sushi. One page lists a glossary and pronunciation guide of Japanese names, words, and types of sushi. Throughout, the illustrations in ink and watercolor are a perfect accompaniment for the text. Interesting and entertaining, this story is also a very good educational tool.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3 - This picture-book biography presents the lives of two sushi chefs: a father and daughter. Readers meet the adolescent Akira Suzuki as he strives to supplement his family's income by apprenticing in a Tokyo restaurant. They may be amazed by a career that consisted of scrubbing the floor for the first year, cooking rice for the second, and working long days for 10 years to realize a goal. The opportunity to pursue his dream in New York ultimately led to marriage, fatherhood, and the desire to share his heritage. Young Hiromi attended Japanese school on Saturdays and celebrated special days, but she especially wanted to learn her father's trade. Akira welcomed her interest-"Girls can do things here that they cannot do in Japan"-and the pattern of learning began again. Hiromi's achievement is celebrated in a spread of labeled, delicately arranged sushi. The story came full circle when the Tokyo restaurateur paid a visit and enjoyed his meal. Ink-and-watercolor scenes are rendered in salmon and grays; each childhood is captured in black-and-white "snapshots." One odd choice, given the author's access to her subject, is the pseudo-Japanese in the signage, described as merely illustrative. An author's note and photograph of Hiromi Suzuki are followed by a pronunciation guide. An inspiring story of a young woman crossing a boundary, an informative glimpse into a career, and a study in perseverance, this title will appeal to a varied audience.-Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584302759
Publisher:
Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/2007
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x (h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile:
AD600L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews