ISBN-10:
0295984171
ISBN-13:
9780295984179
Pub. Date:
09/04/2004
Publisher:
University of Washington Press
Hitchcock with a Chinese Face

Hitchcock with a Chinese Face

by Jerome Silbergeld

Paperback

View All Available Formats & Editions
Current price is , Original price is $35.0. You
Select a Purchase Option
  • purchase options
    $31.50 $35.00 Save 10% Current price is $31.5, Original price is $35. You Save 10%.
  • purchase options
    $19.43 $35.00 Save 44% Current price is $19.43, Original price is $35. You Save 44%.
    icon-error
    Note: Access code and/or supplemental material are not guaranteed to be included with textbook rental or used textbook.
  • purchase options

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780295984179
Publisher: University of Washington Press
Publication date: 09/04/2004
Pages: 160
Product dimensions: 8.50(w) x 10.00(h) x (d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jerome Silbergeld is the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History and director of the Tang Center for East Asian Art at Princeton University. His numerous books include Contradictions: Artistic Life, the Socialist State, and the Chinese Painter Li Huasheng and China into Film: Frames of Reference in Contemporary Chinese Cinema.

Table of Contents

DVD Film ScencesAcknowledgmentsA Note on Transliteration1. Hitchcock with a Chinese Face: Suzhou River2. Oedipus Comes to Hong Kong: The Day the Sun Turned Cold3. The Chinese Heart in Conflict with Itself: Good Men, Good WomenNotesBibliographyIndex

What People are Saying About This

Eugene Y. Wang

If the 'reality' of contemporary China comes down to not only the dizzying mushrooming of new skyscrapers and the rage of state—run capitalism with a Chinese twist but also new perceptual habits and new mindsets, then there is nothing more sensitive to these changes than the film medium; for demonstration of this, nothing better than the set of films chosen by Silbergeld; for unpacking them, hitherto there is no better reader of them than Silbergeld.

Marek Wieczorek

Hitchcock with a Chinese Face belongs to the absolute best of scholarship in film studies. It brings together three films very diverse in stories and styles, moods and speeds, geographic origins and geopolitical problems. In this book these unite to form a multifaceted picture of more universal psychological and cross-cultural themes, including matters of the heart such as love and betrayal, or the profound intersections between ethics and aesthetics, politics and soul.

From the Publisher

"If the 'reality' of contemporary China comes down to not only the dizzying mushrooming of new skyscrapers and the rage of state—run capitalism with a Chinese twist but also new perceptual habits and new mindsets, then there is nothing more sensitive to these changes than the film medium; for demonstration of this, nothing better than the set of films chosen by Silbergeld; for unpacking them, hitherto there is no better reader of them than Silbergeld."—Eugene Y. Wang, Harvard University

"Hitchcock with a Chinese Face belongs to the absolute best of scholarship in film studies. It brings together three films very diverse in stories and styles, moods and speeds, geographic origins and geopolitical problems. In this book these unite to form a multifaceted picture of more universal psychological and cross-cultural themes, including matters of the heart such as love and betrayal, or the profound intersections between ethics and aesthetics, politics and soul."—Marek Wieczorek, University of Washington

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Hitchcock with a Chinese Face 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Henry_Berry More than 1 year ago
Silbergeld takes the three Chinese films Suzhou River, The Day the Sun Turned Cold, and Good Men to examine how Western film techniques have been brought into Chinese cinema. The films also evidence that Western literary and cultural influences are a part of Chinese cinema. The influence of Freud, Faulkner, and Dostoevsky can be seen in one or more of the films; and, not surprisingly, the cinematic techniques of Hitchcock are seen, as well those of David Lynch and Jean Luc-Godard. 'The [Chinese] films are remarkable for their intellectual depth and range, their layered complexity, their emotional sobriety, their appeal to a sophisticated film audience rather than a mass market, their determined critique of contemporary culture...and the resonance of their moral voice.' The same could be said for Western art films, which the Chinese films plainly resemble, to the point of imitation in many ways. In a pocket inside the back cover is a CD with scenes from the movies. Silbergeld's selection of only three distinctive, yet in many ways representative films makes for an efficient, yet pithy exposure to the best of Chinese art films; which films are gaining more attention as China's economic and political power grows.