ISBN-10:
184821295X
ISBN-13:
9781848212954
Pub. Date:
05/31/2011
Publisher:
Wiley
Home Area Networks and IPTV / Edition 1

Home Area Networks and IPTV / Edition 1

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781848212954
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 05/31/2011
Series: ISTE Series , #563
Pages: 288
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Jean-Gabriel Rémy has previously held several R&D positions in French telecom operators (France Telecom & SFR). He is today an adviser for telecommunications topics in the French ministry of economy, industry & energy.

Charlotte Letamendia is currently responsible for new products at SAGEMCOM, a company which is well advanced in the design and production of high-speed Internet devices.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Services Offered by Home Area Networks 1

1.1 Why home networking? 1

1.2 Service convergence 2

1.2.1 Triple play 4

1.2.2 Quadruple play 6

1.2.3 Services linked to the person 7

1.2.4 Home services, energy saving, intelligent housing 8

1.3 IP or non-IP home area networks 8

1.3.1 Comparison with automobiles: the requirement of standards for home networks 10

1.4 Bibliograpy 11

1.5 Appendix: the uses of very high bit rates 11

1.5.1 Progressive deployment 13

1.5.2 Client ubiquity 16

Chapter 2 Receiving Television via Internet: IPTV 19

2.1 Introduction 20

2.2 Digital TV formats (DVB and MPEG standards) 20

2.2.1 MPEG 20

2.2.2 DVB 21

2.3 Digital TV transmission through IP 29

2.3.1 History and market 29

2.3.2 The evolution of consumer trends 32

2.4 IPTV: elements of the network 33

2.4.1 General points 33

2.4.2 Data transmission in an IPTV network 37

2.4.3 Quality of service 40

2.4.4 IP channel-switching 48

2.4.5 IPTV in a local loop 49

2.5 Set-top box (STB) hardware and software design 50

2.5.1 IPTV middleware 51

2.5.2 Content protection 52

2.5.3 Interactivity 52

2.6 Bibliography 53

2.7 Appendix: notes on digital television 53

2.7.1 Video 53

2.7.2 Screens, size and resolution 55

2.7.3 Production 57

Chapter 3 Household Internet Connections 61

3.1 Network cables 61

3.1.1 Introduction 61

3.1.2 Communication media 63

3.1.3 The DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS standard 69

3.1.4 Modems and DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS CMTS 72

3.1.5 RF DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS signals 73

3.1.6 Sizing optical nodes for DOCSIS services 77

3.1.7 Digital Television 78

3.1.8 Analog television 79

3.1.9 The last mile: from local loop VHF to fiber 80

3.1.10 Transport and distribution of signals from headend to local loops 84

3.2 Internet access by means of outdoor PLC 91

3.2.1 Structure of an electrical supply network 92

3.2.2 Use of the electric pair by PLC 93

3.2.3 Frequencies used by PLC 95

3.2.4 PLC standards 96

3.2.5 Administration of an outdoor PLC 97

3.3 Fiber optics to the home (FTTH) 98

3.3.1 Introduction 98

3.3.2 Fiber optic technologies 99

3.3.3 Fiber optic cables 104

3.3.4 Lasers, LEDs and optical receivers 106

3.3.5 Fiber optic subscriber connections: FTTx 107

3.3.6 Fiber to the Home (FTTH) 119

3.4 xDSL networks 120

3.4.1 Introduction 120

3.4.2 General points 121

3.4.3 ADSL technology 124

3.4.4 Data organization: ADSL frame and superframe 128

3.4.5 Elements of ADSL access 129

3.4.6 Protocol architecture for ADSL 133

3.4.7 Gigabit Ethernet transmission 139

3.4.8 Unbundling 140

3.4.9 Services over an ADSL network 141

3.5 High bit rate radio: satellite, WiMAX and LTE 144

3.5.1 Introduction 144

3.5.2 Worldwide Inter-operability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) 145

3.5.3 LTE (-SAE) 149

3.5.4 Internet by satellite 151

3.6 Bibliography 152

Chapter 4 Home Area Network Technologies 155

4.1 Copper pair cables 155

4.2 The home network in coaxial cable 157

4.2.1 Communication mediums 158

4.2.2 Transported signals: DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS 159

4.2.3 Terminal section 159

4.2.4 FTTLA beyond 2012 160

4.3 Home networks using indoor power line communications 160

4.3.1 Standards and norms 163

4.3.2 Possibility of two different networks 164

4.3.3 Safeguarding the local network 164

4.3.4 Analysis and administration 164

4.4 LTE femtocells 165

4.4.1 Introduction 165

4.4.2 The LTE standard and femtocells 166

4.5 Plastic optical fibers 167

4.5.1 POF transmission 167

4.5.2 IEEE 1394 standard 171

4.5.3 Recognition of other mediums and external connections 174

4.6 WiFi home area networks 175

4.6.1 Introduction 175

4.6.2 General points 176

4.6.3 Connection to the Internet using radio waves 177

4.6.4 WiFi protocol layers 177

4.6.5 Successive WiFi standards 183

4.6.6 Transmission technologies 183

4.6.7 WiFi network deployment 189

4.6.8 Privacy 195

4.6.9 802.11n: the future of WiFi 200

4.7 Home gateway 204

4.8 Bibliography 206

Chapter 5 Software Structure used in Home Area Networks 207

5.1 Characteristics of Home Area Networks 207

5.1.1 Heterogeneity 208

5.1.2 Dynamicity 209

5.1.3 Absence of an administrator 210

5.2 The digital leisure network: UPNP/DLNA 211

5.2.1 The UPNP/DLNA organization and certification 211

5.2.2 Devices, service and action models 213

5.2.3 Classes of devices: home, mobile, internetwork 217

5.2.4 Formats: images, audio, video 222

5.2.5 Networks and transport of media 223

5.2.6 Conclusion 226

5.3 Home systems networks 226

5.3.1 The needs of home systems networks 226

5.3.2 MAC and physical layers on an RF network: IEEE 802.15.4 228

5.3.3 Networking and datalinking over an RF Network: example of ZigBee 233

5.3.4 Networking and datalinking over an electric cabled network 235

Chapter 6 Software Structures in Use for Home Area Networks 237

6.1 Service gateways 237

6.1.1 The role of a service gateway 237

6.1.2 Service administration: OSGi bundles 239

6.1.3 Collection and redistribution of information: contexts and methods 242

6.2 Security in home systems and multimedia networks 242

6.2.1 Service access methods 242

6.2.2 Virtual networks (VPN) 244

6.3 Bibliography 245

Chapter 7 Service Platforms 247

7.1 Service platform for a managed network 247

7.1.1 Services 247

7.1.2 Servers 249

7.2 Internet kiosk on an unmanaged network 252

7.2.1 General points 252

7.2.2 Security 253

7.2.3 Private life 254

7.2.4 Development languages of applications 254

7.3 Sharing resources 255

Glossary 259

Index 271

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