Home at the End of the World

Home at the End of the World

by Michael Cunningham
4.2 39
ISBN-10:
0312424086
ISBN-13:
2900312424083
Pub. Date:
06/02/2004
Publisher:
Picador
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Overview

Home at the End of the World

Two lifelong friends in their 20s form a triangle with a young woman in New York City. When she becomes pregnant, the three move to the country to set up housekeeping in Woodstock, embarking on a daring voyage toward a new vision of what a family can be.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900312424083
Publisher: Picador
Publication date: 06/02/2004
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

Customer Reviews

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A Home at the End of the World 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having read The Hours (and finding it excrutiatingly boring) years ago, I approached this book with much apprehension, especially upon instantly being reminded of Cunningham's device of telling each chapter from a different character's perspective. While it was annoying in The Hours, I feel that it really added a depth to this novel. My only beef with it being that often times an event would occur and be told from a particular perspective that wasn't as potentially interesting as another's might have been (i.e. Clare's version of the first time she had sex with Bobby, rather than from Bobby's POV which seemed infinitely more rich to me). The plot leaves something to be desired. Each of the character's definitely take a journey, but I don't feel that the action in many cases was interesting enough to work. It seemed as if the circumstances of these character's lives were often forced in order to lead to some sort of emotional or psychological revelation. On the whole, I found the entire thing to be unbelievable, though I did wholly believe the characters as well-rounded individuals (go figure!). In terms of action, I also have to say that Cunningham is a little too showy and smart for his own good. The language of this text is occasionally too flowery and descriptive for its own good. At several times I felt that the action sputtered or completely stalled while the writer turned a phrase or showed exactly how 'good' a writer he really is. The treatment of AIDS in this book is certainly worthy of note. At the end I was entirely floored by the seemingly careless regard for such a serious subject. But then I had to remember that this was written in the early 1990s and perhaps there wasn't as great a sensitivity towards the subject (though even that I don't entirely believe). While this may have been the attitude towards the disease at large in our country (and our world for that matter), I am continually surprised when gay writers don't at least make a small effort to 'lead by example' so to speak and present a positive image or attitude instead of reflecting the negative one. I fully understand the fear and abhorance that are clearly illustrated here in this book, but is it really necessary to present AIDS so hopelessly? While it might be fatal it isn't instant death, and so much of this novel makes you wonder why people don't just kill themselves as soon as they discover they have it. All of that being said, I guess I would still have to recommend this book to others. Obviously the writing is above average if it was able to provoke such a charged response out of me hours and days after I have finished reading the book. Be warned, though, there is little happiness or hope to be found here.
ashley1331 More than 1 year ago
i couldnt put it down! the characters are complex and delightful. the book is written by the perspective of almost all the characters. very touching to show a very new age "family"
Jenn0710 More than 1 year ago
A Home At The End of the World is, in my opinion, Cunningham's best work yet. It's the story of Bobby and Jonathan, best friends and social outcasts, and their unspoken love affair through the years. When Bobby joins Jonathan and his friend, the older and free-spirited Claire in New York, the trio become a family and the dynamics change as Bobby and Claire begin a love affair and Jonathan feels like an outcast, unable to express to Bobby his deep love for him. Claire and Bobby have a child together, and the three raise the girl together. Eventually, Calire comes to see that Jonathan and Bobby are happiest together and she leaves with the little girl. It's proof positive that a family doesn't have to consist of a mother, a father and a child but that a family is whatever you make it to be.
Guest More than 1 year ago
From Michael Cunningham, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Hours, comes this widely praised novel of two boyhood friends: Jonathan, lonely, introspective, and unsure of himself and Bobby, hip, dark, and inarticulate. In New York after college, Bobby moves in with Jonathan and his roommate, Clare, a veteran of the city's erotic wars. Bobby and Clare fall in love, scuttling the plans of Jonathan, who is gay, to father Clare's child. Then, when Clare and Bobby have a baby, the three move to a small house upstate to raise 'their' child together and, with an odd friend, Alice, create a new kind of family. A Home at the End of the World masterfully depicts the charged, fragile relationships of urban life today.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is very well writen and weaves a story about interesting characters and thier interesting choices in life. It almost read itself to me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Cunningham deserves multi BRAVOS for this book! The story stirred my inner passions and reflectiveness. This is wonderful writing! BRAVO, BRAVO, BRAVO!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a fabulous read. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. The characters are interesting and unusual. Cunningham gets to the very heart of what makes a home and what is a family.
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