Homicide in Hardcover (Bibliophile Series #1)

Homicide in Hardcover (Bibliophile Series #1)

by Kate Carlisle

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451226150
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/03/2009
Series: Bibliophile Mystery Series , #1
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 67,173
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

A native Californian, New York Times bestselling author Kate Carlisle worked in television for many years before turning to writing. A lifelong fascination with the art and craft of bookbinding led her to write the Bibliophile Mysteries featuring Brooklyn Wainwright, whose bookbinding and restoration skills invariably uncover old secrets, treachery, and murder. She is also the author of the Fixer-Upper Mysteries featuring small-town girl Shannon Hammer, a building contractor specializing in home restoration.

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Homicide in Hardcover (Bibliophile Series #1) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 118 reviews.
cupcake19 More than 1 year ago
If I could get my money back on this book, I would. What a big disappointment because with the setting of a book restorer who solves mysteries, my book friends & i had great hopes we found a new series to read. The cover art markets the book as a "cozy", but why the author thinks that great girlfriends call each other bitc!*s & other street language at every turn is beyond me unless one is 16 years old. I'm not a prude; I enjoy a wide variety of books, but this seemed a sad attempt to channel Janet Evannovitch, whose books are, of course, not cozies, just to juice up the story. But the story didn't need "juicing up" with the street language. It could have been a terrific series for us cozy readers & truthfully, I'm sad that she felt she needed street language to pull in readers.
Sensitivemuse More than 1 year ago
I'd have to say, I haven't laughed so hard at a book in a while. Brooklyn isn't your typical strong woman. She faints when she sees blood, she's well..whimpy. Yet there's nothing wrong with that. I thought she was filled with humor and wit, I found myself laughing at a lot of her thoughts and predicaments. What I found myself laughing more was her mother, who went into her mentras and chants when something was to go wrong. I think the entire story gets more kooky and crazy considering Brooklyn's mother and father were part of a hippie community. The plot is good and evenly paced. There's a good amount of mystery and action. There's bits of humor into it which certainly makes the mystery lighter and a more fun read. What I really enjoyed reading was the way Brooklyn eliminates the possible suspects and eventually finds out who the real murderer is. It was an interesting process of elimination and also helps the reader find out who the killer might be. I was close, but not close enough. I enjoyed Brooklyn and her kooky family. Her possible relationship with Derek was also fun to read as he annoys her to no end. Especially moments where he makes fun of her and although Brooklyn is pretty good at comebacks herself, sometimes she stays dumbfounded and attempts to think of something to say while Derek keeps egging her on. They do make an interesting couple - however I have seen better. Overall, a great cozy mystery that ended just a little too, but the humor and fun plot made it all the worthwhile read. This one is great for the bibliophiles and cozy mystery lovers alike.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am new to the cozy mystery genre and decided to start with this book because the cover and synopsis drew me in. Well, it could have been a series I would have continued except for the ending and the language. I did think the main character was a bit annoying but I was willing to overlook that. What really got to me was who the murderer was and their motive. When I read that part I said to myself-seriously?? I didn't think it was very logical. The other issue that turned me off was the language and while I am new to this genre, I'm pretty sure the f word shouldn't be used. That and the other curse words thrown in just completely threw me out of the cozy mood. So overall, for me, it just wasn't worth the time spent reading it.
MysteryWriter222 More than 1 year ago
This is Kate Carlisle's first book in her Bibliophile mystery series. I stumbled upon this book on accident and was immediatly drawn in by the cover and then even more so once what it was about. I could not put this book down. I have fallen in love with this author, this series, her writing style and most of all her characters. Brooklyn is the perfect female protagonist. She is very relateable and so funny. A wonderful new series that I plan to keep up on and read as many as she will publish. This is a wonderful book for mystery fans and just general book lovers alike. You don't have to be a huge mystery fan to love this book. It has romance, mystery, suspense, humor - it has it all. I commend Kate for a wonderful job well done and am looking forward to her next book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Finally! A cozy for real people! I like to read a quick mystery, but they often times get too wholesome for me. The heroine who still hasn't gotten past second base with either boyfriend after... what?... 15 books because she's worried about what her small town might think of her?! (Yes, I'm looking at you Hannah Swenson.) Characters addressing each other as Mister and Missus, all around prudes who live in these sanitized podunk towns, well it's a bit too much to take. I hate to tell cupcake19, but this is how real people act and talk. Real people occasionally use "street language" and * gasp * they get it on too! It's nice to see someone writing to an audience that isn't shawl-wearing, small-minded grannies who get their panties in a bunch if you use a word stronger than "gosh." Thanks, Kate Carlisle! I can't wait to read more.
bookworm2123 More than 1 year ago
I bought this book on a whim browsing in Barnes and Noble and I certainly don't regret it. The characters are interesting and the writing makes it hard to put down. I've read a lot of mysteries and have often been disappointed. But this is a true mystery with twists and turns and the continuing question of whodunnit. I can't wait for the next book in the series!
Salgal More than 1 year ago
It was good little read for a Sunday afternoon. I enjoyed it and would buy her next book.
cyn_chow More than 1 year ago
It was with trepidation that Brooklyn Wainwright attended the showing of the rare book collection at the Covington Library. The guest of honor, Abraham Karastovsky, was responsible for the collection's restoration and was also Brooklyn's friend and mentor up until 6 months ago, when she told him that she was leaving to start up her own business. However, all seemed to be forgiven, so it¿s heartbreaking when Brooklyn discovered Abraham dying, leaving Brooklyn with a priceless edition of Faust and last words a strange clue. Brooklyn, now responsible for completing his last assignment to restore the priceless - and reportedly cursed - volume of Goethe¿s Faust has to discover who murdered Abraham in order to save herself from both the killer and the British detective in charge of protecting the Library's collection. The frustratingly attractive Commander Derek Stone delights in taunting and tantalizing Brooklyn, so she believes that it's up to her to solve the mystery that may be hidden in Abraham's books. Plagued by a psychotic stalker and former rival for Brooklyn's boyfriend, Brooklyn has to dodge attempts on her life, a break-in, visits with her commune family, and Gabriel, mysterious man in black who's definitely no angel.
Fans of Janet Evanovich will enjoy this surprisingly (for a bibliophile mystery) spirited and sexy novel. While I've never been fond of mysteries that have the heroine lusting for the detective while he suspects her of being a murderer, Carlisle makes this work as Brooklyn is just as irritated with herself for her feelings. Booklovers will enjoy the minutiae of book mending and lovingly detailed descriptions of the beautiful edition of Faust, and mystery readers will revel in the plethora of quirky, hilarious characters. My one complaint is that the novel ended too quickly, leaving me wanting to know more about her five commune-raised siblings and new age Deadhead mother. Thankfully, the series looks to continue with Brooklyn leaving for Edinburgh for a new job, so here's to the hope that Brooklyn's hilarious adventures with her family continue. Pick up Homicide in Hardcover in paperback as soon as you can.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Slightly marred by "the curse" twist which went out as a sub combo when paranormal started messing up straight genres along with fantasy and spiritual ( stop for prayer and direction) too many themes can spoil the book best to borror if uncertain of sample
Judy-Ree More than 1 year ago
This first book, Homicide in Hardcover, introduces us to Brooklyn Wainwright. She is a book binder and was raised in a wine making commune near San Francisco, California. I found the subjects interesting and learned so much about the process to repairing classic books. I had one major nitpick about the book. It was page 14 before we learned Brooklyn’s first name and page 23 before we learn her last name. The book was written first person POV, which I don’t mind, but why did it take so long to learn our protagonist’s name? There were 2 gentlemen introduced to us that could end up as love interests. I am not sure which one I like best yet, as both sound very interesting. I really hope we learn more in future books. Over all this was a good start to a series and I can’t wait to read more.
TCCT More than 1 year ago
I really like this series. I am fascinated with the book restoration process and the rest of the story is good as well. I was kind of disappointed towards the end because I felt the last part of the story was kind of rushed. Things just came together too quickly. The "romance" between Brooklyn and Derek did not grab me at all. The characters just don't seem a good fit. Maybe in later books it will get better. I have already purchased the remainder of the books in this series and have put aside a series I am currently reading for this one.
RdScrpion More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It was a very good book. And educational. Who knew so much went into restoring antique books. I would definately recommend this series.
horomnizon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Absolutely loved it! A quick, witty mystery that kept me turning pages until I finished it at 2am. Book restoration expert Brooklyn is caught up in a ring of murders and can't quite figure out why. The plot moves quickly and there were enough surprises along the way to keep me guessing. Can the hot detective trailing her be trusted? Is the old copy of Faust really cursed? I really loved the sarcasm and natural thought process that Brooklyn shows - especially when she's by herself. I will definitely be waiting in line for the second book in the series. Just a fun and clever murder mystery with a lovable main character.
nbmars on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Homicide in Hardcover is an adorable mystery about Brooklyn Wainwright, a San Francisco book restoration expert who gets caught up in a criminal investigation. Her former beloved mentor, Abraham Karastovsky, has been murdered while working on a supposedly cursed book, The Faust.Brooklyn takes over the project, and tries to solve the crime herself with the help of her kooky family, a handsome security officer, and some endearing friends. (Brooklyn¿s name, along with the odd place names of her siblings, comes from the places where her hippie parents had been to Grateful Dead concerts.)The book has loads of humor, suspense, good fun, and some great lines. (My favorite: ¿Suffice it to say, this was another lesson learned the hard way. Men were good for one thing only. Killing spiders.¿)It compares very favorably to another new mystery out this year involving a book restorationist by ¿a New York Times Bestseller¿ who, in my opinion, doesn¿t hold a candle to Ms. Carlisle.If you like food, wine, sass, the frisson of suggested sex and a bit of mystery, you won¿t be disappointed by this delightful book.
chinquapin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Brooklyn Wainwright is a book conservator and she was happy and excited to meet up with her mentor, Abraham Karastovsky at the gala at the Covington library celebrating the restoration project of a collection that includes Goethe's Faust. While there, however, she finds Abraham in his workroom, dying in a pool of his own blood, and he utters a cryptic word and gives her the Faust. Brooklyn is now faced with attempting to figure out who killed her beloved mentor and why. There were parts of this book that I greatly appreciated. I enjoyed the descriptions of bookbinding and repair. I also liked the depictions of many of the characters, such as Brooklyn's hippie parents and the police detective Derek. However, the mystery seemed a little flat to me, and it seemed that there were a lot of improbable things happening, even for a cozy mystery. And I didn't really care for Brooklyn herself...I found her acerbic, flippant tone irritating, and I just don't like a character who could forget to feed her neighbor's cats. I think it is unlikely that I will read another in this series.
Booklovingmommy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the first cozy mystery I have read and I actually really liked it! It reminded me a lot of the Nancy Drew mysteries I read when I was younger. It was an easy, fast and kinda "fluffy" read but super fun!Brooklyn restores books in San Francisco. She is invited to her mentor's celebration for his latest book restoration project that includes Goethe's Faust. The collection belongs to a very wealthy and prestigious family who really knows nothing about books. As Brooklyn looks for her mentor, Abraham, so she can have a sneek peak of the Faust, she catches the eye of private security, Derek Stone. She meets her mom downstairs on her way to Abraham's workroom and is surprised to see her there. As her mom hurries away, Brooklyn finds Abraham....dying in a pool of blood. He gives her the Faust and a clue. Now she just has to find out what the clue means while trying to defend her innocence. The characters are definitely fun! Derek is good looking and serious, Minka is just a pain in the butt woman that you want to smack. Brooklyn's parents are fun, yet flighty. There was one issue that I can't really divulge or I'd have to add a spoiler alert but when Brooklyn finds out a friend is gay (in present day San Francisco), he cries and is so embarrassed and ashamed. I mean, hello? It is 2011 (well, 2009 in the book) in San Francisco. Why would anyone be ashamed to be gay there? Why would you really try to hide it to the extent that this person did? All in all, this was just a fun mystery read. The death attempts on Brooklyn's life were unrealistic and at times, a little corny but I was expecting that. The ending was rather ridiculous but again, like in a Nancy Drew book, I was expecting it. So, since I was expecting a little fluff and corniness, I really enjoyed this book! It will not be my last cozy mystery!
thornton37814 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A book conservator under whom Brooklyn apprenticed ends up dead while working on a rare edition of Faust that is said to be cursed. Who killed him and what was the motive? The book was heavy on action and low on plot. My favorite parts of the book are the descriptions of the book conservations that are taking place. I'm not sure I ever completely warmed to the supporting characters in this series, and I'm not sure the commune in which Brooklyn grew up is a setting I want to revisit. I do have the second in the series so I will likely give it a try in the future. This was a pretty quick read although it did not leave me completely satisfied.
PamelaSweet on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
rooklyn Wainwright is a book doctor extraordinaire. Faded, brittle leather and crusty, smelly pages are like heaven for Brooklyn. The daughter of two 60¿s flower children who moved their family to a California commune, Brooklyn discovers her talent for book restoration under the mentorship of family friend, Abraham Karastovsky.Brooklyn and Abraham didn¿t speak for several months after Brooklyn decided to strike out on her own in the world of book binding but their relationship is restored on the eve of a celebration for Abraham¿s latest book restoration. Their reunion is short-lived, however, when later that evening, Brooklyn finds her mentor lying in a pool of blood. With his final words, he gives her a cryptic message, along with a priceless, and cursed, copy of Goethe¿s Faust.She becomes a prime suspect in Abraham¿s murder since she was the last person at the scene of the crime. To exonerate herself, Brooklyn must find the real killer. Could Abraham¿s final words be a clue or do they refer to something else entirely?Brooklyn sorts through a handful of possible suspects while trying not to end up dead herself. With the help of British security officer Derek Stone, she gets the job done. Little help, I should say. One of my few quibbles with this story, is that Mr. Stone seems to just show up in time to get Brooklyn out of trouble (although you¿ll find the detective/cop/love interest doing this in other cozy mysteries as well). We really know nothing about him. I hope in future books he does more than just look and sound sexy.I enjoyed Brooklyn¿s fun sense of humor, she had me laughing out loud, and complete love of her craft. Book binding and the book arts are a recently discovered interest of mine and it was fun to read about some of the tools and techniques used in these fields.Homicide in Hardcover is a fun read with an engaging heroine and some kooky characters, like Brooklyn¿s hippie parents, Guru Bob, and and her quirky neighbors. The plot suffers slighty from a measure of predictability but the ending might come as a surprise. This series holds much promise and I look forward to reading Ms. Carlisle¿s next book.
sensitivemuse on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'd have to say, I haven't laughed so hard at a book in a while. Brooklyn isn't your typical strong woman. She faints when she sees blood, she's well..whimpy. Yet there's nothing wrong with that. I thought she was filled with humor and wit, I found myself laughing at a lot of her thoughts and predicaments. What I found myself laughing more was her mother, who went into her mentras and chants when something was to go wrong. I think the entire story gets more kooky and crazy considering Brooklyn's mother and father were part of a hippie community. The plot is good and evenly paced. There's a good amount of mystery and action. There's bits of humor into it which certainly makes the mystery lighter and a more fun read. What I really enjoyed reading was the way Brooklyn eliminates the possible suspects and eventually finds out who the real murderer is. It was an interesting process of elimination and also helps the reader find out who the killer might be. I was close, but not close enough. I enjoyed Brooklyn and her kooky family. Her possible relationship with Derek was also fun to read as he annoys her to no end. Especially moments where he makes fun of her and although Brooklyn is pretty good at comebacks herself, sometimes she stays dumbfounded and attempts to think of something to say while Derek keeps egging her on. They do make an interesting couple - however I have seen better.Overall, a great cozy mystery that ended just a little too, but the humor and fun plot made it all the worthwhile read. This one is great for the bibliophiles and cozy mystery lovers alike.
ForeignCircus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Since I love book, bookbinding, and mysteries, this should have been the perfect summer read. Unfortunately, though the characters are interesting and the plot was initially engaging, the whole book never quite snapped together for me. The characters were just a little too quirky all together (I mean, surely everyone knows at least a few normal people) and the solution to the mystery seemed completely out of nowhere to me (in terms of motive). I really wanted to like this book, but instead just found myself plodding through to get to the end.
Squeex on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I made this my purse book as it meets the requirements, a story I wouldn't be hard-pressed to try to keep up between reading time and it must fit in my purse and not take up too much space. Cozies/Amateur sleuth books fit this bill nicely. Only this one, I wanted to spend more time with than I was getting. The characters are funny and smart or really slap the face mean. The career/artistry of the main character, Brooklyn, is a first for me. I am pretty sure I haven't read a book with bookbinding as the path any of the characters have wandered and this was a real treat. Seeing the love of the craft, the tools required, the people involved, all that jazz...but that never felt forced or overwhelmed the story. It was nicely in the background and moved the story and mystery along. Brooklyn getting involved as the amateur sleuth was nicely done, too. Her friend, Abraham, was murdered and she was accused of the murder and she wanted to clear her name and find who actually killed her mentor and friend. I loved Brooklyn's family and her background of commune living and Grateful Dead memories of her mother and father. I want to visit Dharma, the commune, and the winery that Brooklyn's dad operates with love and wisdom. And her mom is priceless and very spiritual and funny and warm. Five fab peace out book beans......
grundlecat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
On the whole I enjoyed this mystery. It took me a while to warm to the protagonist; initially I found her to be rather whiny and self-centered. She grew on me, though, and I was glad that I overcame the urge to put the book away at around page 80. I'll be starting the next one shortly.
cyderry on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Brooklyn Wainwright loves books. She treats them with reverence and had made restoring and repairing them her life's work. So when her teacher/mentor is murdered while working on the restoration of a rare book, and Brooklyn takes over, she resolves to find the murderer as well as restore the book.This was a well-written first in a series cozy with good character development as well as good mix of characters. The mystery was well-plotted with several twists and turns and it held this reader's attention throughout. I'm looking forward to the next one.
TheLibraryhag on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Brooklyn Wainwright is a master bookbinder who has been estranged from her mentor Abraham, but she is reunited with him at a celebration of his lastest restoration for the Winslow family. She is delighted that they have resolved their differences but that is cut short when she finds Abraham dying in his workroom. He leaves her with a vague clue and she is determined to discover who the killer is.I really enjoyed this book. I love Brooklyn and her wacky family and extended family from the commune she grew up on. Brooklyn is a lot of fun and I liked the story. I admit that a lot is going on in the story and the mystery gets a bit lost at times. But in cozies, I often overlook some weaknesses if I find the characters fun. I definitely did in this book. I will be reading more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It’s summer and I read probably three times more than I do during the school year. I have been blessed to discover Kate Carlisle books. I’m not a wordsmith so it is difficult for me to write how very much enjoyed the #1 book in Bibliophile series. I look forward to many hours of happy reading as I continue to read every one of Kate Carlisle ? ? ?????????