×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Honest Abe
     

Honest Abe

by Edith Kunhardt, Malcah Zeldis (Illustrator)
 

See All Formats & Editions

From a log cabin in Kentucky to the White House, the life of Abraham Lincoln is an inspiring saga of courage and dedication. Simple words and timeless pictures weave the important threads of Lincoln's life into a colorful folk tapestry that illustrates a true American pioneer of justice.

"Zeldis's oversized gouache paintings give this picture-book biography a

Overview

From a log cabin in Kentucky to the White House, the life of Abraham Lincoln is an inspiring saga of courage and dedication. Simple words and timeless pictures weave the important threads of Lincoln's life into a colorful folk tapestry that illustrates a true American pioneer of justice.

"Zeldis's oversized gouache paintings give this picture-book biography a folkloric look that suits its larger-than-life subject. Kunhardt's brief text avoids any fictionalization and presents the important events in Lincoln's youth and many careers in a straightforward, objective fashion.... A praiseworthy effort."School Library Journal.

"Hits the high spots and finds time for memorable tidbits... Consider multiple copies."Booklist (starred review).

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Striking folk-art paintings more than compensate for a thuddingly flat text in this picture book biography of Abraham Lincoln. Apparently written to fit the illustrations, the choppy, teacherly prose often hinders the narrative drive, as in this description of Lincoln and Mary Todd's courtship: ``Mary was twenty-one years old. Abe was thirty. Mary was popular. She liked dancing and spoke French. Abe and Mary were married.'' In this vein Kunhardt ( Pat the Cat ; Red Day, Green Day ) reports all the familiar episodes: Lincoln's childhood in a log cabin, his debates with Douglas, the assassination by ``a man who was furious at the President for freeing the slaves.'' But the paintings vivify the story, commanding attention with vibrant greens, blues, reds and yellows. No staid portraits here! Placed one to each oversize page with generous trim as if hung on a wall, they are seemingly unpolished but genuinely American, much like the man they commemorate. Ages 5-up. (Jan.)
Children's Literature - Nancy Partridge
Kunhardt relates the life of Abraham Lincoln from birth to death in honest, simple tones. While the language is plain, with Lincoln's early years covered in a mundane way, the story actually provides lots of information, briefly explaining difficult subjects such as slavery and the Civil War. The primitive, naive style of painting is also deceptive, done in bright slightly jarring colors in a childish manner, with exaggerated perspective. The visual impact of an illustration of slaves for sale up on a podium, being looked over by white men in top hats, and another one of the Battle of Gettysburg, with little piles of soldiers lying dead on the ground, are quite evocative. The contrast between the voice and style, obviously meant for young children, and the seriousness of the content, is a little disturbing. It does, however, give a clear and accurate account of this great man's life, and the influence he had on the world. There is a copy of The Gettysburg Address at the end of the story, which is very moving and appropriate, and a timeline highlighting important events in Lincoln's life. This book should find a niche in a social studies/history curriculum.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688158385
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/1998
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
539,411
Product dimensions:
9.93(w) x 12.00(h) x 0.06(d)
Lexile:
630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Malcah Zeldis, illustrator of Martin Luther King, lives in New York City.

In Her Own Words...

"For many years I secretly wanted to paint and become an artist, but I was afraid to study art because I felt I had no talent. It was only when my children were grown and away from the house and I found myself with time on my hands that I dared to begin to paint without expecting anyone else to like or approve of what I was doing. When I finally showed my work to art critics and connoisseurs, I was amazed by how eagerly it was accepted.

"After this initial acceptance I began to paint furiously, trying to make up for the lost time when I had been inhibited and unable to work. The images were flowing out of me with incredible speed. Now, some twenty-three years later, my work is in seventeen museum collections, including the Smithsonian, where one painting is on permanent display.

"Again to my amazement, these last few years my work has taken a new turn as I have been illustrating books for children. I am deeply grateful for this new means of expression I have found. It has enriched and deepened my experience, and I look forward to the continuation of my creative life."

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews