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Honey Sandwich
     

Honey Sandwich

by Elizabeth Honey
 

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A collection of cheeky, funny, high-energy poems.

"Squeezed Fresh Daily"

Mothers lurk behind doors
and lunge at you like Jaws
making careers
out of things in your ears
saying how much they miss you
finding excuses to kiss you.

Elizabeth Honey's funny and accessible poems capture every day life in all its splendor from a child

Overview

A collection of cheeky, funny, high-energy poems.

"Squeezed Fresh Daily"

Mothers lurk behind doors
and lunge at you like Jaws
making careers
out of things in your ears
saying how much they miss you
finding excuses to kiss you.

Elizabeth Honey's funny and accessible poems capture every day life in all its splendor from a child's point of view. She takes as her subjects stick-loving dogs, messy siblings, beleaguered parents, kindly grandparents, and the wild boys down the street. And though many are silly, and a couple downright rude, taken together
these poems exude enormous warmth and affection between young and old. The characters represented here are part of an extended family that we can all recognize and love.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This Australian import is a hilarious mix of poems about everyday life from a child's perspective. Some poems are silly, some poignant, and some naughty and downright shocking to adult sensibilities. "Great-Grandmother/Ancient Great-Grandmother,/she's a hoot./She calls me "Old Slipper,"/I call her "Old Boot."/When she says,/"Why aren't you in bed yet!"/I always say, "Why aren't you dead yet!" Original, simple child-like, and highly expressive line drawings perfectly complement and extend each poem's theme and, in some cases, the print formats seem to jump right off the pages echoing the words. Children will delight in the humorous Shel Silverstein-like no-holds-barred takes on adult behavior, and enjoy reading the poems out loud. "Cutter and Spike" offers a humorous conversation between a knife and fork, and parents will chuckle or shudder with recognition at "Flying with Bradley" about a plane trip with a toddler and an infant. "Stick Crazy Dog" perfectly captures the wild antics of the dog of the title. A refreshingly youthful lack of inhibition is evident throughout. A most remarkably astute rendition of life from the child's point of view. 2004 (orig. 1993), Alfred A. Knopf, Ages 8 to 10.
—Quinby Frank
Library Journal
Gr 3-6-Honey, well-known for her snappy dialogue in novels such as Fiddleback (Knopf, 2001), has put her talents to work in this collection of concrete poems, rhyming poems, and free verse. Many of the offerings take the form of conversation, mostly between family members. Some are quirky: "Aunt Lorna kisses into space/near your ear, not on your face./I don't call that kissing,/I call that missing." Others, like "Excuse Me," are overly long and become tiresome. As the author admits in an appended note, many of the selections are "irreverent." For instance, fat ladies doing water aerobics are described: "Wrinkled saggy baggy old white hippos/wobble like jelly when they laugh." "Great-Grandmother" ends with "When she says,/`Why aren't you in bed yet!'/I always say,/`Why aren't you dead yet!'" Energetic ink sketches appear throughout. James Stevenson's Corn Chowder (Greenwillow, 2003) is similar in tone to this title, but has brighter illustrations and more varied typography. While not the best choice for readers looking for a poetic feast, Honey Sandwich at least makes a good snack.-Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This illustrated collection of 54 poems, about half of them rhyming, was originally published a decade ago in Australia. They vary widely in content, form, and quality, including some concrete poems; funny, short ones about pets and siblings and naughty little children; and longer, rambling ones in stream-of-consciousness or dialogue format. While some of the selections are funny, just as many aren't, and several would be offensive to many parents and teachers, specifically three about older women, one called "The Hippos," for instance. The jacket copy admits that some of the poems are "downright rude," and they certainly are. Though this collection clearly crosses over the boundaries of appropriateness and good taste in several instances, there are those children who will enjoy the humor, both sweet and tart. (Poetry. 7-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375928215
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
02/10/2004
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.44(w) x 7.26(h) x 0.51(d)
Age Range:
6 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

“Squeezed Fresh Daily”

Mothers lurk behind doors
and lunge at you like Jaws
making careers
out of things in your ears
saying how much they miss you
finding excuses to kiss you.



“Bonnie Leigh-Dodds Did Riverdance”

“They're having a talent show at school,”
said Bonnie. "I'm going to do Riverdance.”
“That will be so embarrassing!” said her
sister Gemma. “I'm not going to watch:”
“She's seen that video a hundred times,”
said Mum.
Dad taped the music.

First Fiona played the flute,
then Hazel and Melanie did ballet.
One of the big boys mucked up his
magic trick.
Quite a few played the piano.

“And now the only first grader,” said
Mrs. Bloomfield.
“Bonnie will be performing Riverdance
for us today.”

Bonnie started with her back to the
audience, and tossed her mane of
gorgeous thick Irish hair, except it was
little flyaway blond wisps.
The Irish music was wild and loud.
In Gemma's flower skirt and white
crop-top crocheted blouse
and her red party shoes,
Bonnie danced.
Arms straight by her sides,
she hopped and jigged.
She whirled and whirled.
And twirled and twirled.
The little skirt swished and flounced.
She leaped and bounded.

She grinned during the hard bits,
and went cross-eyed in the spins.
She made the shape of number four
with her legs, and hopped and pawed the
ground like a pony.
When everyone began to clap in time,
Bonnie's dance grew wilder.
All over the stage she leaped and spun,
toes flashing like sharp red pencils.
Just when she was giddy and exhausted
it was lucky the music ended.
Everyone stamped and roared!
Puffing like a steam train, but very proud,
Bonnie bowed low.

Martin scraped on
his violin.
Two girls played a
recorder duet.
Sarah Jade did
gymnastics,
and there were
many other acts,

but Bonnie Leigh-Dodds did
Riverdance.

"How did you go?" called Mum when
she heard the front door slam.

“I won!"


“The Mat Sat on the Cat”

(in a gangster voice, like Robert De Niro, or Marlon Brando in The Godfather)

“Take dat, you dirty mat-sittin' cat!
I ain't no fat cat habitat.
Why, you bin sittin'
since you was a kitten.
You know dat's true.
An' because o'you,
I got de treatment at de laundromat.
Well, I ain't takin' no more o'dat.
I'm squashin' you flat, cat,
and dat's dat!”


“Auntie Dot”

Auntie Dot
hasn't got a lot.
In her flat
there's a cat
a loaf of bread
a little blue bed
a rickety table
a friend called Mabel
a baked bean
a magazine
a golden fish
an ancient wish
a rug
a mug
a tin
a pin
a shell
a smell
a cup of the sea
a dead TV
and
me.

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