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Hope and Despair in the American City: Why There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh
     

Hope and Despair in the American City: Why There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh

4.8 4
by Gerald Grant
 

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ISBN-10: 0674032942

ISBN-13: 9780674032941

Pub. Date: 05/30/2009

Publisher: Harvard University Press

In 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a 5–4 verdict in Milliken v. Bradley, thereby blocking the state of Michigan from merging the Detroit public school system with those of the surrounding suburbs. This decision effectively walled off underprivileged students in many American cities, condemning them to a system of racial and class segregation and

Overview

In 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a 5–4 verdict in Milliken v. Bradley, thereby blocking the state of Michigan from merging the Detroit public school system with those of the surrounding suburbs. This decision effectively walled off underprivileged students in many American cities, condemning them to a system of racial and class segregation and destroying their chances of obtaining a decent education.
In Hope and Despair in the American City, Gerald Grant compares two cities—his hometown of Syracuse, New York, and Raleigh, North Carolina—in order to examine the consequences of the nation’s ongoing educational inequities. The school system in Syracuse is a slough of despair, the one in Raleigh a beacon of hope. Grant argues that the chief reason for Raleigh’s educational success is the integration by social class that occurred when the city voluntarily merged with the surrounding suburbs in 1976 to create the Wake County Public School System. By contrast, the primary cause of Syracuse’s decline has been the growing class and racial segregation of its metropolitan schools, which has left the city mired in poverty.
Hope and Despair in the American City is a compelling study of urban social policy that combines field research and historical narrative in lucid and engaging prose. The result is an ambitious portrait—sometimes disturbing, often inspiring—of two cities that exemplify our nation’s greatest educational challenges, as well as a passionate exploration of the potential for school reform that exists for our urban schools today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674032941
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
05/30/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • 1. What Happened to America’s Cities?
  • 2. Can This Neighborhood Be Saved?
  • 3. Three Reconstructions of Raleigh
  • 4. There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh
  • 5. A Tragic Decision
  • 6. What Should We Hope For?
  • 7. Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

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Hope and Despair in the American City: Why There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
JP18 More than 1 year ago
Grant's book compares inner city education in Charlotte, NC and Syracuse, NY and also trcaes his own path as acitizen and academic scholar in education. Using the success of Charlotte in overcoming th barriers of poverty and winning the support of the community in general by combining innercity and suburban public education, Grant clarifies the problems of the poor and the lack of concern of those with means for the plight of those stcuk in inner cities. What is suprising is that a southern state with a history or racial segregation made advances in education which raised the achievement of inner city students without dimishing the accomplisments of suburban students with greater means, overcoming any fears of those who may have moved out of the city core because of a desire to better educate their children. On the other hand, Syracuse did not follow this path of combing city and suburban school systems and the education of the porr, often African -American students of the city, has suffered by comparison. For those of us who live in large cities and are concerned about the education of our children, Grant reveals a succesful program that cities should consider.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book gives an engaging historical account of how government policies led to segregation in America's cities - which resulted in failing schools with high concentrations of poverty - and how one school system is addressing the problem by attempting to balance schools for socioeconomic diversity. The author has managed to make the book an interesting read by weaving in details of his own family's life in Syracuse. Because I live in Raleigh/Wake County, I found the section on Raleigh's long history (dating back to the Civil War) of progressive racial integration policies fascinating, and it helped me put into proper perspective the "battle" that is currently being waged between those who support our school system's diversity policy, and those who do not. This book is enlightening and well-written. If you have any interest in learning more about how our society can begin to tackle the problem of poverty, you will enjoy reading this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is about time that the Raleigh (Wake County) school system gets some credit for providing one of the best school systems in the country, despite that we spend less than other areas per student($1350 less per student against the national average). We do this through innovation - keeping the 'walls' down between the urban and suburban areas, not allowing high-povery schools, and much more... Thank you, Dr. Grant. I hope your message inspires more communities to learn to teach ALL students in an equal and exceptional way.