Hope and Have; or, Fanny Grant Among the Indians: A Story for Young People

Hope and Have; or, Fanny Grant Among the Indians: A Story for Young People

by Oliver Optic

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Overview

Hope and Have; or, Fanny Grant Among the Indians: A Story for Young People by Oliver Optic

The fifth volume of the Woodville stories contains the experience of Fanny Grant, who from a very naughty girl became a very good one, by the influence of a pure and beautiful example, exhibited to the erring child in the hour of her greatest wandering from the path of rectitude. The story is not an illustration of the "pleasures of hope;" but an attempt to show the young reader that what we most desire, in moral and spiritual, as well as worldly things, we labor the hardest to obtain-a truism adopted by the heroine in the form of the principal title of the volume, Hope and Have.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781515120148
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 07/17/2015
Pages: 88
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.18(d)

About the Author

William Taylor Adams (July 30, 1822 - March 27, 1897), pseudonym Oliver Optic, was a noted academic, author, and a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Adams became a teacher in the Lower Road School in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1843, he resigned from his position as master of the school in 1846 in order to assist his father and brother in the management of their new hotel in Boston, the Adams House hotel. Adams decided that he preferred teaching so in 1848 he returned to teaching this time at the Boylston School in Boston. In 1860, Adams was promoted to the position of master of the Boylston School. When the Bowditch School was founded, Adams transferred to that school as its master, a position he held until he resigned from teaching in 1865. This experience naturally brought him closely into contact with boys, and he learned much of what interested them, which had a good deal to do with his eventual success as an author. Extensive travel abroad and a deep knowledge of boats, farming, and practical mechanics were other factors that gave his works reality.

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