The Hornet's Nest: A Novel of the Revolutionary War

The Hornet's Nest: A Novel of the Revolutionary War

by Jimmy Carter
3.6 19

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

The Hornet's Nest: A Novel of the Revolutionary War by Jimmy Carter

The first work of fiction by a President of the United States—a sweeping novel of the American South and the War of Independence.

In his ambitious and deeply rewarding novel, Jimmy Carter brings to life the Revolutionary War as it was fought in the Deep South; it is a saga that will change the way we think about the conflict. He reminds us that much of the fight for independence took place in that region and that it was a struggle of both great and small battles and of terrible brutality, with neighbor turned against neighbor, the Indians’ support sought by both sides, and no quarter asked or given. The Hornet’s Nest follows a cast of characters and their loved ones on both sides of this violent conflict—including some who are based on the author’s ancestors.

At the heart of the story is Ethan Pratt, who in 1766 moves with his wife, Epsey, from Philadelphia to North Carolina and then to Georgia in 1771, in the company of Quakers. On their homesteads in Georgia, Ethan and his wife form a friendship with neighbors Kindred Morris and his wife, Mavis. Through Kindred and his young Indian friend Newota, Ethan learns about the frontier and the Native American tribes who are being continually pressed farther inland by settlers. As the eight-year war develops, Ethan and Kindred find themselves in life-and-death combat with opposing forces.

With its moving love story, vivid action, and the suspense of a war fought with increasing ferocity and stealth, The Hornet’s Nest is historical fiction at its best, in the tradition of such major classics as The Last of the Mohicans.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743255448
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 10/01/2004
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 496
Sales rank: 356,834
Product dimensions: 6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.22(d)

About the Author

Jimmy Carter was the thirty-ninth President of the United States, serving from 1977 to 1981. In 1982, he and his wife founded The Carter Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of people around the world. Carter was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002. He is the author of two-dozen books, including A Full Life; An Hour Before Daylight; Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid and Our Endangered Values. He lives in Plains, Georgia.

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Hornet's Nest: A Novel of the Revolutionary War 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A truly wonderful book written by a truly great man of immense genius. This book is a delight to read. If you are a fan of Mr. Carter and history, this is a book you will immensly enjoy. If I could rate it one hundred stars, I'd do so without hesitation. Thank you, Mr. Carter for this book, and keep them coming.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel does a spectacular job of telling the history of the South during the American Revolution. It is obvious that Jimmy Carter put in much effort and research while writing this novel. He does a great job of describing the events in the South, which are usually ignored by most books. This book would be a very excellent choice if you were into history. Although the historical side of this novel is fantastic, the storytelling is very poor. There are many parts in the book filled with an enormous amount of historical detail, but nothing seems to happen in the plot. The story stands still for much of the book. Also, this book has many characters that show up once or twice and then disappear for the remainder of the novel. The few characters that do remain throughout the whole novel seem lifeless and inhuman. Overall, this book is an excellent tale of historical information but not so good as a story. I learned a lot about the role of the South in the American Revolution through this novel, but I did have some trouble getting through the slow plot.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a book that really takes you to the time and place of which Jimmy Carter writes. History was never one of my strong likes but Hornets Nest has changed my outlook. Mr. Carter knows how to teach you history and pull you deep into the lives of his characters. What a great read ! Even my husband is into it and he very seldom has the time to sit down and read a book. J. Ware Leonard, TX
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book, but I must say truthfully that I enjoy almost any books written about the colonial period in Georgia history simply because there are so few of them. The Debatable Land: A Novel of the Southeast. 1739-1746, Reap the Whirlwind: A Novel of Augusta during the Revolution and Rascals Heaven are the only three that come to mind at this moment. As a matter of fact, The Hornet's Nest is very similar in style and content to Reap the Whrilwind. I would recommend any of these titles to a reader interested in good historical fiction.
Guest More than 1 year ago
HN is a definitely a strange breed of history and fiction. While reading the novel, I often found the story to be more enlightening than entertaining, with intricate historical detail. This worked for me simply because I'm a curious reader and I was fascinated with tidbits to enhance my understanding of this historical event. For those looking for a title that is entertaining in nature, I would suggest a different read. On the other hand, if this genre is your forte, then I would recommend it. The most disappointing detail would be the forced nature of the ending; the story concludes quite suddenly and leaves the reader a little confused about how suddenly wins the Revolutionary War.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The subject and the characters are an important story, but the telling is less than professional. A nice attempt by President Carter.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have tremendous admiration and respect for former President Carter. I am truly sorry I can't post a better review of his first novel, but ¿ well, here it is. The book's greatest strength is the tremendous amount of research that went into it. It works wonderfully well as a history of the American Revolution in the South, and that's certainly a neglected viewpoint. It is also, exactly as I would expect, well written from a technical standpoint. Presented as nonfiction, I'd have found it enjoyable reading; but for me it didn't work as a novel. Its characters speak in stilted, pedagogical voices, imparting information to modern readers when they should be interacting with each other in believable fashion. The endless pages of detail would be appropriate in a history book, but in fiction they make excruciatingly slow reading because they fail ¿ most of the time, anyway ¿ to move the plot along. Getting lost in the story and caring about the characters might happen for some other reader, but it wasn't possible for me. I learned from this book, but I can't say that I was entertained by it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A reasonably effective attempt to tell the story of the Revolution in the South through the voice of real and fictional characters. While thoroughly researched in most instances, there are several obvious gaffs in historical names and places. For instance, Carter calls South Carolina patriot Thomas 'The Gamecock' Sumter, Francis Sumter and he tells the reader that the Battle of Camden took place in North Carolina. I enjoyed this book for the sake of gaining new perspectives on events in our history which have received little attention over the years, but agree with the readers who say that Carter lacks any real skill at developing a story to go along with his basic historical narrative.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Expecting more from this book. A novel but not really developed. Jumps from one character to another, from one area to the next leaving you without ever developing a story that holds your interest. Many characters mentioned only to disappear. To many pages spent on very little development of historical material. Probably could have done as well in 100 pages. Just never got going on anything.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished The Hornet's Nest and thoroughly enjoyed it. As someone who rarely reads fiction, the book captured my attention from start to finish. The opposing views of the characters, combined with the often unexpected, yet brutality of the war, made for an interesting read. I definitely would purchase another historical fiction book written by our former president.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm in the middle of the book, and I like it very much. It is definitely holding my interest. However, I do not feel at all involved with the characters. The author just tells what happens to them without embellishment. I would have loved to know what it felt like to BE Epsey Pratt! You feel like a spectator (or at least, I do). I hope Mr. Carter writes more novels, especially historical ones, but with better character development.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Frankly I was disappointed. While I readily admit the historic facts were interesting and opened up a new view of the conflict, the fictional context it was written in was unsatisfying. I learned alot of new information about the politics, social issues, battles and the impact of the war in the deep south, but the characters did not interest me and I felt the dialog was much to oriented toward obviously giving the reader the historic background and in many cases was out of character with the speaker. Frankly nobody speaks that way except a history teacher in school. The book's pace was too irregular and I struggled to finish.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lots of talk, little action in this methodically researched work of historical fiction. And only 1 typo, which is outstanding by today's standards. The book does provide a glimpse into how we ever could have won the Revolutionary War, losing battle after battle after battle. However, we persevered and wore down the British through skirmishes and guerrilla warfare. The Vietcong and NVA returned the favor to the U.S. 200 years later in Southeast Asia. A good look into the Revolutionary War in the South for historians as well as the general reader.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Three stars for the extensive historical research, but no stars for the literary quality. I'm lamenting the lost opportunity for the 10 or 15 no-name novelists with talent whose careers could have been kindled with Carter's advance money.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A book which shows that the American Revolution in the South was more like the first American Civil War than anything else. Families and neighbors were divided by real issues that they thought worth fighting and dying for, and the situation, as ably depicted by Mr. Carter, was full of complexity, drama, and sorrow. This is what the film 'The Patriot' should have been.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great Novel of the Revolutionary War from the Southern perspective. Great characters - Ethan Pratt, Epsey Pratt, Kindred Morris, Thomas Brown and Elijah Clarke. How President Carter keeps the reader informed of the events in other parts of the colonies was a nice touch. Number of surprises, kept me turning the pages. Great background, character development interwoven with historical facts. Great descriptions of the conflicts between the Patriots and Loyalists. Reading this novel was a great pleasure.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this a different view about the first war here fought in the united states. thank you president carter for giving this view point on our american history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The title is as intriguing as was the title when used by E.P.Roe in a novel of the same name when first published in 1886. The theme is eerily the same...American revolutionary war in the deep South,Whigs, and Northern settlers lately removed to the South.