House of Meetings

House of Meetings

by Martin Amis
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Overview

House of Meetings by Martin Amis

An extraordinary, harrowing, endlessly surprising novel from a literary master.

In 1946, two brothers and a Jewish girl fall into alignment in pogrom-poised Moscow. The fraternal conflict then marinates in Norlag, a slave-labor camp above the Arctic Circle, where a tryst in the coveted House of Meetings will haunt all three lovers long after the brothers are released. And for the narrator, the sole survivor, the reverberations continue into the new century.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780099488682
Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/28/2008
Pages: 199
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Martin Amis's best sellers include the novels Money, London Fields, and The Information, as well his memoir, Experience. He lives in London.

Hometown:

Oxford, England

Date of Birth:

August 25, 1949

Place of Birth:

Oxford, England

Education:

B.A., Exeter College, Oxford

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House of Meetings 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ya sure
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Amis' novel is not only an introspection into the relationship of two Russian brothers. While this surface plot is moving an exceedingly well written, those who have read Conrad's Under Western Eyes and Dostoyevsky will also enjoy the numerous quotes and ideas from these authors and their works that Amis includes in order to show the difference between actual Russia and the Russia that is perceived by Europe. This is a superb work.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 2004, the wealthy octogenarian Russian tours one of his former homes, the gulag and several other such horrific places. As he looks around this place of horror, he writes down what he sees and what he remembers so that his American 'stepdaughter' Venus will never forget long after he dies.---------- He compare the Russian-American relationship today to that of his time along with his brother Lev in the Norlag concentration camp from 1948-1956. On top of his memories, he provides Venus with a second letter that a dying Lev sent him in 1982 soon after his nephew died in Afghanistan. He thinks about his first love, Lev's wife Zoya, who married a Soviet apparatchik before becoming a drunk. Life has been hard on him and his family, but he can go peacefully because his Venus lives in affluence in America.------------ Though not quite as powerful as Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn¿s THE GULAG ARCHIPELAGO 1918-1956, the brothers and Zoya are compelling characters as readers will envision Stalin¿s death camps from their perspectives. The key message of ¿never forget so that history does not repeat itself¿ hits home throughout the plot and is accentuated when the unnamed narrator and Zoya meet years later at a gulag¿s HOUSE OF MEETINGS. In contrast, Venus comes across as a stereotypical shallow ugly American who has no appreciation for what her ¿stepfather¿ or others went through as she has never had to sacrifice any of affluent lifestyle for any cause or atrocity. She serves as contrast to a evocative look at the effect of surviving carnage.--------- Harriet Klausner