How Good People Make Tough Choices: Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living

How Good People Make Tough Choices: Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living

by Rushworth M. Kidder
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How Good People Make Tough Choices: Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome!
mlsPA More than 1 year ago
Good read. Enjoyed the practical examples.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
harstan More than 1 year ago
This is a super reference that provides readers with pragmatic guidance on making ethical choices when often a less moral short cut is available. Mr. Kidder uses specific examples deciding right from wrong in which most frequently neither is absolute and rarely are they the solo options or obvious which is actually right and wrong. In some cases, the dilemma in choosing what your values scream at you is right, but doing so places you in an uncomfortable position when not doing what your gut feels is right would be noticed by only one person. Loaded with specific examples of having to choose (for instance, the example of worried parents talking to their child's teacher about behavior when the child told the teacher a secret in confidence) makes this a winner. Even society and communities have difficult ethical choices between for instance the environment and energy or development and heritage as short term needs bump against long term goals. Sometimes the debate is personal and communal as is the case with abortion. How people look at the issues may change as for instance HIV when Magic Johnson told the world he had it and the economy influences decisions especially in recessions; still Mr. Kidder still feels strongly a person must eat or get their medicine while sticking to their personal values. Throughout Mr. Kidder makes this case to adhere to your personal values even when it hurts in the short run because you are being true to yourself, which in the long run will cause less pain to you. This is a strong guidebook due to the terrific pragmatic examples of making tough ethical choices. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago