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How I Learned to Cook: Culinary Educations from the World's Greatest Chefs
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How I Learned to Cook: Culinary Educations from the World's Greatest Chefs

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by Kimberly Witherspoon, Peter Meehan
 

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From the editors of the internationally critically acclaimed Don't Try This At Home, stories by forty of the world's great chefs about how they learned their craft -- not in the confines of culinary school, but in the inspiring and sometimes death-defying moments of trial-and-error that can happen anytime, anywhere. Hilarious, touching, and always surprising

Overview

From the editors of the internationally critically acclaimed Don't Try This At Home, stories by forty of the world's great chefs about how they learned their craft -- not in the confines of culinary school, but in the inspiring and sometimes death-defying moments of trial-and-error that can happen anytime, anywhere. Hilarious, touching, and always surprising, they cover everything from early adversity to career-making triumphs. How I Learned to Cook is an irresistible treat for cooks (and foodies) of all abilities, and includes stories by such culinary giants as Ferran Adria, Mario Batali, Anthony Bourdain, Gabrielle Hamilton, Suzanne Goin, Eric Ripert, and more...

Editorial Reviews

There is no single recipe for learning to cook superbly. That's one of the reasons why this stand-alone sequel to Don't Try This at Home is even more entertaining than its predecessor. In their debut book, Kimberly Witherspoon and Peter Meehan queried dozens of great chefs about their worst meal ever. In How I Learned to Cook, they ask 40 maestros of the kitchen to share true tales of their apprenticeships. Contributing stories to this hilarious, poignant brew are Mario Batali, Anthony Bourdain, Pino Luongo, Michel Richard, Dan Barber, Daniel Boulud, Fergus Henderson, and Norman Van Aken.
Publishers Weekly
Forty chefs representing notable restaurants all over the world offer a bit of humorous history on how they cut their teeth in the kitchen. Many relate their apprentice moments quaking in the shadow of the Great Chef, such as 14-year-old Daniel Boulud's meeting the famous Paul Bocuse for the first time in his restaurant in Lyon and getting smashed on a glass of blanc cassis, or David Bayless's surreal collaboration with Julia Child on camera after admiring her since he was a kid watching her '60s TV show. Most savory are testimony from the trenches in the heat of the dinner rush, as in Jonathan Eismann's hilarious account of toiling in a fashionable New York City West Village restaurant during the high '80s when his drug-addled staff began dropping like dominos around him at the peak hours of service, and Gabrielle Hamilton's attempts in her tiny fledging restaurant, Prune, not to kill her sous chef with exploding wet fava beans frying in deep fat. Despite voices somewhat skewed in favor of male chefs, the stories are entertaining and well chosen by literary agent Witherspoon (Don't Try This at Home) and New York Times contributor Meehan. (Nov.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal

A companion to the editors' Don't Try This at Home, this volume contains brief essays written by 40 chefs describing their experiences in becoming some of the most famous names in the world of culinary arts. Readers are treated to entertaining anecdotes written by Mario Batali, Jacques Torres, Marcella Hazen, and others, with behind-the-scenes stories of some of the world's greatest restaurants and chefs. We share Ming Tsai's first experience with chocolate ganache: off in his measurements by a factor of ten, he ended up with a chocolate body wash and to this day has a great distaste for the food. We are also given the secret recipe for the "Det burger" of Sara Moulton's Ann Arbor days. Culinary inspirations range from childhood experiences to working with Julia Child to being a short-order cook. There's some value in these tales for those interested in a career in cooking, and for the rest of us there's the joy of hearing wonderful stories of the great chefs. Recommended for most public libraries and culinary arts collections.
—Elizabeth Rogers Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

From the Publisher

“Harrowing, hilarious and…inspiring.” —Wall Street Journal

How I Learned to Cook reassures us that the path to culinary fame is sometimes paved with kitchen fires, exploding fava beans, and unecstatic cherries jubilee.” —Vogue

“A collection of savvy, savory essays by 40 of the world's best chefs and food writers…who share their early triumphs, travails, and innovations as up-and-comers before they ascended to culinary stardom.” —Elle

“Entertaining and inspiring.” —Chicago Sun-Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596912472
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
10/31/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.75(w) x 8.53(h) x 1.05(d)

Meet the Author

Kimberly Witherspoon is a literary agent at Inkwell Management. Peter Meehan contributes regularly to the New York Times and to Life magazine. He helped bring the popular public television series How to Cook Everything: Bittman Takes on America¹s Chefs and Barbecue University with Steven Raichlen to the small screen and recently coauthored Brunch: 100 Recipes from Five Points Restaurant with chef Marc Meyer. He lives in New York City.

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How I Learned to Cook: Culinary Educations from the World's Greatest Chefs 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I happend to be a chef myself, my sister gave me this book as a gift and found it to be a wonderful book! Each chapter in the book has a chef telling their tales of their experience in the kitchen and how they felt for the first time of making mistakes. It shows me that everyone is entitled to falling but always some how rise back to the top. It was totally relatiable to me and maybe to you as well!
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