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How the Leopard Got His Spots
     

How the Leopard Got His Spots

4.8 4
by Rudyard Kipling, Amanda Hall (Illustrator)
 

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Rudyard Kipling, the best-loved creator of childhood favorites The Jungle Book and "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," also gave us the wonderful Just So Stories. Stephanie P. Gilman breathes new life into this series, making them Just So Much Fun! Sometimes change can be good. In this retelling of Rudyard Kipling's classic tale, children will learn from the story of the leopard

Overview

Rudyard Kipling, the best-loved creator of childhood favorites The Jungle Book and "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," also gave us the wonderful Just So Stories. Stephanie P. Gilman breathes new life into this series, making them Just So Much Fun! Sometimes change can be good. In this retelling of Rudyard Kipling's classic tale, children will learn from the story of the leopard about the importance of accepting change and adapting to new circumstances. With captivating illustrations, this silly story will be sure to delight audiences of any age.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
The best thing about this book-and-recording package is the evocative Ladysmith Black Mambazo vocal group providing background on the cassette. Nothing else quite measures up. The narrator's low and sibilant reading is sometimes effective but often difficult to understand unless you are reading along. The chief feature of the sinuous, wildly colored fauvist illustrations is the remarkably unattractive figure of the Ethiopian, who appears to be a victim of advanced elephantiasis, bloating his torso and lower limbs. The eponymous leopard looks rather more like a dog (like Lassie, in fact, in the opening spread) than a cat. Color cues explicitly supplied by Kipling are disregarded (``chestnut blotches'' become Chinese red, pink, and white; ``black spots'' are entirely red and lilac). Leopards, Ethiopians, and the Just-So stories deserve better. --Patricia Dooley, University of Washington, Seattle

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781857932478
Publisher:
Anova Books
Publication date:
08/01/1995
Series:
Just so Stories Series
Pages:
32
Age Range:
9 Years

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How the Leopard Got His Spots 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Let me make it clear that I am reviewing the Signet Classics version of Just So Stories. The reason I say that is because the original versions of these stories contain material that would be offensive to most people today, but the worst of that has been removed from this edition. The other advantage of this version is that it contains Kipling's own illustrations and his captions for those illustrations. Finally, this version is also very inexpensive. These stories were told to Kipling in their original form when he was a child by his Indian nursemaids. They are drawn from many non-Western sources, and provide good contrasts with European fairy tales. In most cases, the stories are about animals or early human beings and their development into their modern form or capabilities. But they are really satires on human weaknesses, with the moral showing how overcoming a weakness will usually create a strength. Here are the stories and their morals: How the Whale Got His Throat -- If you get too greedy, you will bite off more than you can chew. By taking on less at a time, you can absorb more in total. How the Camel Got His Hump -- If you are lazy and procrastinate, you will just have to do without in the future and be less attractive in order to make up for it. Having resources for times of scarcity is always helpful. How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin -- Being too aggressive will cause you to experience retribution from those you harm. With more flexibility, you can be more agile. How the Leopard Got His Spots -- You have a better chance of success if you blend in, rather than trying to stand out individually too much. The Elephant's Child -- If you are too nosy, you can get into mischief. Having a keen nose can help you sniff out and execute more opportunities. The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo -- Be careful what you wish for, you may get it. Being boundless gives you the chance to explore more. The Beginning of the Armadillo -- Versatility is more valuable than knowing just one way to handle a situation. How the First Letter Was Written -- Miscommunication is easier to accomplish than correct communication. Double-check to be sure the message is understood. How the Alphabet Was Made -- Choose combinations of communication that are unambiguous, or you will find yourself confusing everyone. This story is a brilliant essay on how one might go about inventing written language. The Crab that Played with the Sea -- Consider the consequences of your actions before you act, or you may see the actions rebound against you. The Cat that Walked by Himself -- The benefits of helping others greatly improve one's own life. The Butterfly that Stamped -- Actions taken for the right reason have just consequences while actions taken for pride tend to boomerang against us. Each story contains a prose tale, followed by a brief poem. The illustrations are explained in the caption at the end. The style of the stories includes lots of funny repetition, especially in the names of rivers and the features of the animals being described. With each repetition, your smile will broaden until you cannot suppress a good l
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