How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers

How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers

Paperback

$14.26 $16.95 Save 16% Current price is $14.26, Original price is $16.95. You Save 16%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Friday, January 26 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Mazzamau More than 1 year ago
I want to tell you about this wonderful book that Toni has written. I am lucky to be one of the few non-professional people to have had the privilege of reading How to be Sick. First, a little background about myself. I have stage four advanced breast cancer stemming from the genetic mutation BRCA2. I nursed my Mother when she died, have been there while my sister and nieces have undergone and are still undergoing treatment and, of course, my own. I am now on a trial drug to try and stop my cancer spreading plus monthly treatments. All this means I have many days of lying on a bed being very unwell and am also facing a very uncertain future. Toni's book came to me through a link from a friend and it has been a god send. In the past I have both bought and been given a number of books on how to deal and be with my BC. Most are along the lines of me needing to think my cancer away, to completely change my diet, to think possitively and so on - you know what I mean. There is none of that in Toni's book. It is simply the most practical and inspiring book I have read. Toni draws from not only wonderful Buddhist practices, but from movies, songs, people, wrtings, poetry, and her own experiences. She showed me how to face and be with my cancer, to feel the uncertainty, the fear, to be a woman lying on a bed so unwell, worrying... I have been around Buddhists for around 20 years (I am not a Buddhist myself) and the way Toni explains the concepts and practices of Buddhism is the best I have heard. Wow, Toni, I get it... or should I say - I'm getting it. I do not write this lightly, How to be Sick resonated with my very core. As I face all that is cancer, not only now but the future, I am so very very grateful to have Toni's book right there beside me. Thank you.
NookBuddhist More than 1 year ago
This is an easy read. Inforamal. Living with pamcreatic cancer, this book gave me coping mechanisms. Practical, informative. A bit much on the Tibetan Buiddhism, but OK.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got this book because I was interested in the Buddhist theme of this book (I am Christian). I also bought several other books along this line at the same time. I'm looking for a way to cope with my "invisible disease", Grave's disease. The author suffers from severe chronic fatigue. I don't know much about the disease, and considering how I feel with Grave's, she has to be suffering. Having said that, I got a little tired of the whiny, woe-is-me tone of the book. And then she'd switch to a polly-anna frame of mind to make a point about coping. Seemed a bit bipolar. However, the basic principles she outlines for dealing with the emotional side of the invisible diseases is very helpful. She related a story about a friend of hers who was so frustrated with her illness and her inability to functions sometimes that she engaged in really abusive self-talk. This friend admitted that she would never consider talking to anyone else the way she talked to herself. That's me! So I found that section particularly helpful in dealing with my inner frustrations. Overall, I would recommend others who "don't look sick" read this because it does offer some useful coping mechanisms.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful book, not just for those living with chronic illness but for anyone who might in the future become sick -- which is all of us! I am in good health, but I identified with every single page. The writing is clear and unpretentious, laced with gentle humor and illustrated with examples from Bernhard's own life. This book has become a resource that I refer to often for reminders on how to cultivate contentment and even joy even when life is handing me unpleasant circumstances . 
EPClark 11 months ago
The problem for most Western approaches to dealing with a serious or chronic illness is that they are based, whether they know it or not, on the concepts of objective distance and physical and rational control of the situation. But when you are ill, there are can be no objective distance, and you do not have either physical or rational control. You cannot magically make yourself better, no matter how much you might want to, nor, most of the time, can you rationally understand and justify your illness. Sometimes people just get sick. And as for why you? As Toni Bernhard says in this book, why not you? All living beings suffer; this is just how this universal truth is manifesting for you right now. The Buddhist-inspired approach that Bernhard espouses here has many things in common with the popular buzzwords of the current craze for wellbeing. There are things that are recognizably self-care, gratitude lists, and positive thinking. However, because they are based on millennia of a spiritual wisdom that espouses a non-rational, truth-centered approach to life, they strike me, at least, as much more helpful than their frivolous and shallow Western cousins, which are largely focused on instant self-gratification and selfish motives. The self-care techniques that Bernhard presents here are not about putting your needs above those of others, but about recognizing the interconnectedness between you and all other living beings. Bernhard, who at the time of writing had been largely housebound for a number of years with chronic fatigue syndrome of unknown origin, also recognizes the reality of the suffering that the seriously ill and their caregivers experience. Most of the practices she describes start with an acknowledgement of this suffering, before moving on to techniques that can alleviate it, at least in part. By facing the reality of your suffering, it actually makes it easier to deal with, and allows you to achieve some of that objective distance that the Western scientific approach is supposed to give you but can't when you yourself are the subject as well as the object of suffering. Books on Buddhism tend to be either impenetrably abstruse, or deceptively simple. "How To Be Sick" falls into the latter category. It's a very short, easy read, with concise chapters and a bullet-pointed list of practices for different situations--physical suffering, mistreatment by medical professionals, loneliness and isolation, and so on--at the end. This book will not give you an in-depth introduction to Buddhist history and theory (although Bernhard admits that when she first became drawn to Buddhism, she wrote exactly that, merely for her own pleasure and edification), but it will give you a number of hands-on, practical suggestions, and in a format that is suitable for busy caregivers or seriously ill people suffering from brain fog, head and eye pain, or debilitating fatigue. "How To Be Sick" is not a light read, but it is not weighed down by its subject matter either, providing a pithy but profound approach to dealing with one of life's most unpleasant aspects.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
CrysTX More than 1 year ago
Toni really has a way of helping you understand. She shows you the way to compassion for others and just as importantly yourself. Great Book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago