How to Break Web Software: Functional and Security Testing of Web Applications and Web Services

How to Break Web Software: Functional and Security Testing of Web Applications and Web Services

4.7 3
ISBN-10:
0321369440
ISBN-13:
9780321369444
Pub. Date:
02/16/2006
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
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How to Break Web Software: Functional and Security Testing of Web Applications and Web Services 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Andrews and Whittaker describe to the Web programmer how your server side code can be vulnerable to attack across the Web. Web software has a server side and a client [or browser] side. These days, the browser code can be more than just passive HTML. It might have scripts, written in various scripting languages, typically JavaScript. The most common problem is that a cracker can get full access to your browser code. So while you might embed various tests on user input, or pass various parameters in the URL or forms, these can be read and usually altered. From which flows such attacks as buffer overflow, SQL injection and cross site scripting [XSS]. All of which means that the real tests must be done on your server, even if this means replicating tests already done in your browser code. The merit of this book is in how it provides a good level of introductory detail across the various attack vectors. While the topics discussed by the book can often be described in more detail elsewhere, if you need the extra information. For example, on buffer overflows, see 'Buffer Overflow Attacks' by Foster et al. While for defending against SQL injection, there is 'Guarding Your Website Against SQL Injection' by Breidenbach. Or, on the subject of using a Web server, Apache is the most common choice. Thus you can confer with 'Preventing Web Attacks with Apache' by Barnett, which just came out a few weeks ago. The latter book is a good complement to this one. The only quibble I have with 'How to Break Web Software' is in one sentence - 'Phishing is a scam that only diligence and the law will wipe out'. It says that no technical solution is possible. I disagree. I am the co-inventor of several antiphishing US Patent Pending methods, that will publish soon at uspto.gov. We believe these to be seminal, and furnish such a technical solution. We actually like this book and its quote, given that it was published in February 2006, and our first Provisionals were filed in September and October 2004. The text is one of several that reflects the state of the art after our submissions, and before they were publicly disclosed.