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How to Build a Robot
     

How to Build a Robot

by Clive Gifford, Tim Benton (Illustrator)
 

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How to Build a Robot is a guide to building a walking, talking, thinking robot. Along the way you will find out about robots in fact and fiction, from R2D2 and C3PO to real robots a that can smell, learn, fly, and beat humans at chess.

Overview

How to Build a Robot is a guide to building a walking, talking, thinking robot. Along the way you will find out about robots in fact and fiction, from R2D2 and C3PO to real robots a that can smell, learn, fly, and beat humans at chess.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
In the 1920s, Czech playwright Karel Capek published a work entitled RUR. In that play a group of mechanical men were created. While these automatons initially strove to serve their human masters, they eventually turned against them and rebelled. In RUR, Capek's use of the term "robot" was the first recorded usage of a word that is now a common part of modern life. Robots exist in many forms and serve a wide range of useful roles. Robotic technology can be seen on auto assembly lines, in military flying drones such as the United States Air Force Predator, and in ATM machines. Readers with an interest in robotics will find a treasure trove of information in Clive Gifford's "How To" guide to robots. Gifford traces the history of robots and provides a host of activities related to various elements that make up these fascinating creations. Readers are offered the opportunity to create an electromagnet, generate pneumatic force and test water pressures that could impact undersea robots. In addition, the author assists readers to appreciate the complexities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and nanorobots. Additionally, younger readers will enjoy the tongue-in-cheek illustrations that help underscore key points in this interesting book of science. 2001, Franklin Watts, $14.00 and $4.95. Ages 9 to 13. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-These two books are right on target for the intended audience. Robot explains what makes these machines work, their development, inventions that led to robots of today, what the future holds in this field, artificial intelligence, and all about automation in the workplace. The discussion of the advantages of robots is particularly interesting. Their repetitive movements, strength, reliability, and ability to work in all climates and environmental conditions (such as nuclear plants) prove how useful they have become. Neat experiments encourage readers to compare themselves to robots. In Clone, students will learn about what a clone is, facts on fertilization, the search for genes, chromosomes, DNA, ethical and medical issues, and the history of cloning since the 19th century, and get information about scientists involved with these processes. Diagrams enhance the explanations; practical experiments are illustrated and described clearly. Students may learn how to clone a plant or bacteria, or copy DNA. In both books, the cartoon illustrations usually add appeal and information. The covers are juvenile in appearance and may turn off older readers who would benefit from the texts. Still, the titles are useful for report writers and will appeal to general readers.-Michael McCullough, Byron-Bergen Middle School, Bergen, NY Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531146491
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
01/30/2002
Series:
How to Series
Edition description:
First American Edition
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
5.56(w) x 7.94(h) x 0.53(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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