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How to Raise and Keep a Dragon
     

How to Raise and Keep a Dragon

5.0 3
by Joe Nigg, Joseph Nigg (Editor), Dan Malone (Illustrator)
 

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Why keep a dragon? There are many reasons. What else can protect your treasure . . . impress your friends . . . make diamonds out of coal . . . work as a model for coats of arms . . . heat your home? Kids who enjoy whimsy will be delighted by this beautifully illustrated owner's manual for dragon fanciers. It tells about the wide range of different dragons

Overview


Why keep a dragon? There are many reasons. What else can protect your treasure . . . impress your friends . . . make diamonds out of coal . . . work as a model for coats of arms . . . heat your home? Kids who enjoy whimsy will be delighted by this beautifully illustrated owner's manual for dragon fanciers. It tells about the wide range of different dragons available, the characteristics of each, and the equipment and supplies that every dragon owner should have on hand. (For instance, a fire extinguisher.) The book is a fanciful blend of dragon lore and colorful art, the latter including diagrams of parts of winged and non-winged dragons, portraits of sea serpents, depictions of Asian dragons, and many others. More than 250 color illustrations in all. Here's a book that's fun from first page to last.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A handbook for those hooked on the legendary creatures, How to Raise and Keep a Dragon by John Topsell sports a winged dragon with sparkling ruby eyes peering out from a padded cover. Beginning with the searching question, "Should I Own a Dragon?" ("Deciding whether to acquire a dragon is one of the most important choices you'll ever make," the book opens), and proceeding to chapters with instructions on how to raise one, this guide for dragon owners brims with scientific-quality drawings, a genealogy of dragon breeds and even instructions on how to ride sky dragons. Dog owners will most appreciate the humor in the section on "Showing your dragon" and "What judges look for." Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
VOYA - Jonatha Masters
What would it be like to own and raise a dragon? Topsell puts quite a bit of thought into this subject and presents his findings in this delightful guidebook. He begins by discussing the genealogy of breeds and how to choose the perfect breed to raise and eventually show in competitions. Topsell himself owns a Standard Western Dragon named Rowena. She is apparently very dear to his heart, and they spend much of their time together. Topsell continues his guidebook by describing the necessary indoor/outdoor habitats needed for one's dragon, communicating with the dragon, and of course, training and showing a dragon for various competitions. Younger teen readers ages twelve to fourteen will be enthralled by this book. The illustrations of the various dragon breeds are superb and give off the illusion of reality. Topsell peppers his chapters with anecdotal information about his ancestor Edward Topsell, who wrote The Historie of Serpents in 1608 and from whom Topsell has gleaned much of his own information. Younger children and students will enjoy filling out the checklists that Topsell provides to discover if they are truly prepared to own and raise a dragon of their very own. Topsell has also included a resource page where one can stock up on dragon supplies, further reading to include in a dragon library, and a comprehensive index. If one is looking for a lighthearted, entertaining addition to the collection, look no further.
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-Posing as dragon-breeder John Topsell-a descendant of Edward Topsell, author of The Historie of Serpents (1608)-Nigg instructs readers in selecting and caring for a breed of dragon suited for them. Those without much room, for example, are advised to choose a Cockatrice, a rooster-sized creature famous for its bad breath. Only those with a big yard should consider the Dragon of India, which is three times the size of an elephant. A diagram of how to identify dragon eggs; a guide on choosing a healthy, well-adjusted pet from a breeder; and a list of equipment required for proper care (such as a fireproof suit) are included. While not intended as a serious book on mythology, Nigg does share many bits of real dragon lore while spinning out details of what it might be like to live in a world where people breed, register, and show these creatures. Malone's full-color illustrations on every page offer fans many cool pictures to copy or sketch. With its tongue firmly in cheek, this book is a lot of lighthearted fun, and a wonderful choice for display and booktalking.-Walter Minkel, New York Public Library Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764159206
Publisher:
Barron's Educational Series, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/2006
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
7.75(w) x 9.90(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am loving this book!!! I am a 9 year old! Nobody has any proof that dragons are not real, so who knows, you may just be able to get your own dragon!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I myself am a drogon lover and highly recommend this book to people with extensive imaginations and love for fantasies. This book 'along with the dragonology books' is one of the most informative books on dragons someone could ever want to read. It has many different dragon breeds and plenty of information on each breed. It also has many other interesting facts such as what sort of tools and equipment you will need to raise a dragon and 'depending on the breed' what type of habitat your dragon should have. It gives plenty of tips on how to raise a baby dragon and much much more. I hope this helped and have fun raising your dragon! :'
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's a great book and I think very deeply that it is posibly true