How to Slay a Dragon

How to Slay a Dragon

by Bill Allen

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781611940060
Publisher: BelleBooks
Publication date: 01/06/2011
Pages: 228
Sales rank: 855,530
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.52(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

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How To Slay A Dragon 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
rhonda1111RL More than 1 year ago
How to Slay a Dragon by Bill Allen 4 stars How to Slay a Dragon is a fun ride. It is quite the adventure that Greg Hart finds him self in. Greg is a hero in his stories that he writes but in school he is picked on by bullies. One day he was running from the bullies and all of a sudden he is somewhere else Myrth. King Peter of Myrth had his magicians bring him for they believed he was the hero who was prophicied would slay the dragon and rescue the princess. They all really belived this boy could slay the dragon. Greg knew they got the wrong person because their was no way he could kill a dragon. Lucky helped to choose Greg and he knew he was right after all he was lucky. Lucky would show Greg the way. Lucky lost his parents last year and the King brought him to the castle to be brought up. Lucky also had magic backpack that he carried a lot of food even a sword in it. First they have to travel a forest that after you got to the middle the trails disappear. It also is full of monsters. They also have to face a witch to get tools they need to survive a dragon's Lair. Greg has to face a lot of enemys before he even got to see the dragon. It is a entertaining adventure and their is more adventures coming in the future that I would not mind reading too. I was given this ebook to read in exchange for honest review from Netgalley. 01/01/2012 PUB Bell Bridge Books
Dranea on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I love daydreaming about being something I thought I would or could never be: a rockstar, a famous actor, an astronaut, a circus performer, and a hero. We all have had that fantasy where we believe we know exactly how we would act if we were placed in a situation where our fantasies became reality. Greg Hart....poor, poor Greg Hart had no idea that he would not have to just fantasize about what he would do, but he would have to face the most challenging of all the popular fantasies. Greg Hart is a small, well, better say scrawny middle school kid who is always being picked last, beat up, and ignored. He spends his free time writing about exciting adventures in which he defeats trolls and rescues fair maidens in distress. Not only is he not able escape a bully who invades his tree house, but he is also unable to escape a spell that transports Greg into the land of Myrth. Greg Hart soon learns that the people of Myrth have been waiting in anticipation for his arrival. He is a great hero to these people, everyone knows of Greg and his wonderful deeds and all of the wondrous things Greg has accomplished. The only problem is, Greg has not done any of these things yet. He is given a king's treatment and fanfare befitting a glorious hero, but only because a prophecy stated at Greghart from Earth would be slaying a dragon and saving the princess from a horrible fate.Accompanied by Lucky, the luckiest person on Myrth, Greg is sent out on this mission that the entire already expects to be a success because the prophecy said so and prophecies are never wrong. Facing trolls, evil witches, 300 foot tall dragons should be a piece of cake right? With the prophecy on his side and the luckiest person alive, how could anything possibly go wrong? Well, add in the fact Greg doesn't believe in this prophecy any more than he can skin a monkeydog and prophecies don't seem quite as obtainable as one would think. Oh yea, the prophecy was made by a man who appears to have lived longer than the mountains on Myrth and who can only be understood by his wife who is almost completely deaf.....one more thing, the scribe who copied the prophecy is a drunk with atrocious handwriting. I'm all for an adventure with me as the cookable hero...wouldn't you be?? How to Slay a Dragon has a ton of sarcasm in it, something I just happen to be very fond of. You do not go more than a couple of pages without Greg making some sort of remark or humor being thrown in at some point. The humor can be enjoyed by young and old(er) alike. There always seems to be a twist and turn thrown in there as well. The story line seemed to drag for me in several places and I had a hard time keeping from putting the book down and getting a few other things done before returning to the book. Many YA books have a story line that can be engrossing for younger audiences as well as adult readers. This book, I believe, was geared more towards younger readers only. The story is a cute one, but not complex enough to grip an older crowd. The lessons that are taught in this book I believe are strong ones: never give up hope and only you are in charge of your own fate. Greg had an entire planet pushing him to be one thing and to go down a certain path. Greg knew that life and that path was not for him, and he went against the popular ideas and made his own way. Kudos to Greg for knowing who he was and being the best darn Greg he could be!
rhonda1111 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
How to Slay a Dragon by Bill Allen 4 starsHow to Slay a Dragon is a fun ride. It is quite the adventure that Greg Hart finds him self in. Greg is a hero in his stories that he writes but in school he is picked on by bullies. One day he was running from the bullies and all of a sudden he is somewhere else Myrth.King Peter of Myrth had his magicians bring him for they believed he was the hero who was prophicied would slay the dragon and rescue the princess. They all really belived this boy could slay the dragon. Greg knew they got the wrong person because their was no way he could kill a dragon.Lucky helped to choose Greg and he knew he was right after all he was lucky.Lucky would show Greg the way. Lucky lost his parents last year and the King brought him to the castle to be brought up. Lucky also had magic backpack that he carried a lot of food even a sword in it.First they have to travel a forest that after you got to the middle the trails disappear. It also is full of monsters. They also have to face a witch to get tools they need to survive a dragon's Lair.Greg has to face a lot of enemys before he even got to see the dragon. It is a entertaining adventure and their is more adventures coming in the future that I would not mind reading too.I was given this ebook to read in exchange for honest review from Netgalley.01/01/2012 PUB Bell Bridge Books
06nwingert on LibraryThing 7 months ago
A combination of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Chronicles of Narnia and The Hobbit, How to Slay a Dragon is a cute juvenille fantasy. 12-year-old Greg Hart gets beat up in school, but is whisked away to Myrth, a magical land, where it's prophicized that he will defeat Ruaan, the giant, evil dragon. As he travels around Myrth, he encounters a variety of people who help him on his quest, while he doubts his abilities to defeat Ruaan. Bill Allen wrote a wonderful juvenille fantasy. I enjoyed his puns, usually using Greg's last name (Hart) in place of heartand Myrth instead of myth. Just like other fantasy novels, Allen's prophecy only comes true because a character or characters act on it, making it a self-fulfilling prophecy.
ronincats on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This book for middle-school kids was an ER book.This quest story about a twelve-year-old boy yanked into a fantasy world to kill a dragon is saved from mediocrity by its clever variations on the traditional quest story as well as its atrocious but very clever puns. The action moved quickly, the characters were interesting, and the ending left a lot of room for other stories to follow in the series. Because of my work in the elementary school, I've read a lot of books at this level, and this is one of the better of the later crop of series.
Mariah7 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I really enjoyed this book. It was funny. Greg had a great sense of humor about the whole thing and is a realistic character. All the little adventures they went through kept me entertained. This book is more for younger kids but at 18 i really liked it.
beckylynn on LibraryThing 7 months ago
How to Slay a Dragon is basically Percy Jackson in Medieval times. Allen has believable characters and really develops them into likeable people. However, with that being said, I found the storyline a bit boring....(yes, I know, boo and hiss). Greg was continously finding himself in tight places and by some magic way, getting himself out of them. Allen has a lot of potential in my personal opinion in the writing world, his ideas and characters are great, but his writing is a bit confusing in places. You can tell he is a funny man, and wants to put that into his work, but it just isn't always appropriate in EVERY situation.
Stewartry on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This is a young adult novel I was granted access to by Netgalley ¿ my thanks. It's a classic idea: a much-bullied 12-year-old boy is whisked off from his down-trodden life to another world, where he can become a hero. Greg Hart is just that boy ¿ and Myrrth is just that other world. He abruptly finds himself in the middle of a ring of wizards who have gone searching for him through the worlds. Well ¿ searching for the mighty Greghart, prophesied to slay the dragon who will take the princess. Greg protests futilely that he would have trouble slaying a dragonfly, much less a dragon ("He'd be lucky to win a fight against one of the smaller girls at school") ¿ particularly when he realizes there's a bona fide dragonslayer called Greatheart ¿ but no one listens: they are certain that the prophecy clearly points to him, and prophecies guide everyone's lives on Myrrth, and therefore a-slaying he will go. It's a clever and fun twist on the idea. I had two problems with the writing: Greg was constantly "almost scream"ing or "nearly scream"ing or straight out screaming ¿ and when it wasn't screaming it was shrieking. The other fingernails-on-a-blackboard thing was a misuse of language, an incorrect past tense used constantly. It's actually a sort of a spoiler to be more specific; the blunder is necessary. But really irritating. If you find puns intolerable, this is not the book (or series) for you; from chapter headings on through puns abound. My favorites herein are the names of the dragons, Ruuan being the one Greg is expected to take out. It does wear a little thin after a while, but might be fun for its actual target audience. I liked Greg (mostly) and the other characters (mostly ¿ and especially Ruuan), and while I found it a little irritating that there were some mysteries left mysterious (who Nathan is, exactly, for example) it is understandable in light of plans for a series. It's a good foundation - and with one of my favorite covers of the year so far.
dancingstarfish on LibraryThing 7 months ago
¿Greg held his breath as they passed and silently congratulated himself for not screaming, even if his ability to keep quiet was largely due to the tightness of the hand Nathan clamped over his mouth. In moments the danger was gone.¿Scrawny, scared, twelve-year-old Greg Hart likes to write in his journals about grand adventures. In real life, he is more likely to be seen running at top speed from a bully than fighting one. One day much like any other, he is running away from one of his main tormentors, Manny Malice, when he is magically pulled into the world of Myrth. The people of Myrth tell him they brought him there to fulfill a prophecy. The prophecy says that ¿Greghart¿ (not to be confused, of course, with Marvin Greatheart, who lives in Myrth and is a dragonslayer by trade) will rescue a princess and slay the dragon. This terrifies Greg because he knows he cannot conceivably do either. Greg protests that he isn¿t a hero and can¿t fight a girl successfully (much less finish this quest in one piece) but he is ignored. Everyone good-naturedly tells him hes being silly, of course he can slay the dragon, rescue the princess and live to tell the tale. They shoo him off onto his adventure and Greg goes mostly because he can¿t seem to get anyone listen to him.Although it starts off a bit slow, Bill Allen¿s How to Slay a Dragon becomes a charming fantasy story full of humor and amusing encounters. Greg is a great character because he is practical, realistic and ultimately terrified of everything. He keeps trying to get out of the adventure by constantly pointing out to people the various ways he won¿t survive.Despite his protests, everyone on Myrth believes fully in the prophecy which causes Greg to doubt every decision they make, as each one seems to lead him closer and closer to being incinerated by the dragon. Since he is new to the world of Myrth, he can¿t help but look for danger or magic around every corner. In response, the characters of Myrth have a dry sense of humor that is delightful to experience.(In this passage Greg is getting ready to go meet with the evil Witch and his friends are helping him to prepare.)¿I want you to take this with you¿ Nathan said, holding out his weathered staff. ¿Be careful with it though. I want it back in one piece when you return.¿Greg took the proffered staff and held it out at arm¿s length. ¿What is it?¿¿A stick,¿ said Nathan.¿I can see that. I mean what does it do?¿¿It doesn¿t do anything. You just hold it while you walk. It helps you balance and hop over puddles and things.¿¿Really, Greg,¿ said Lucky. ¿Haven¿t you ever used a walking stick before?¿This book is a great read for youngins who are looking for a light adventure on a rainy afternoon. A note to young adult literature enthusiasts, it is definitely written for Greg¿s age group and may not appeal to all ages. I guarantee though, your 9-12 year-olds will enjoy his antics and the heaps of trouble he constantly falls into, whether he likes it or not.
vkhowll on LibraryThing 7 months ago
In "How to Slay a Dragon", Greg Hart is a 12 year old boy who spends his days running from bullies, admiring girls from a distance, and writing in his journal about the adventures in which he day-dreamed he is the hero. While running from a bully, Greg is magically swept into a would in which he is prophesied to be the great dragon-slayer hero of the world of Myrth. He is told that he will defeat the dragon Ruuan and rescue the princess. Though Greg has no confidence in himself, everyone around him is sure that he will fulfill the prophecy. He is encouraged by those around him and as the story goes along you see Greg gaining confidence in himself.This was an exceptionally good book that anyone would find endearing. In the beginning, I found the book to be a little slow in the beginning but as I continued to read I became more interested. I found many parts to be very funny. The book sent a great message that no matter your size or status in life that you have the ability to conquer any obstacle.
ASBiskey on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This is one of the best books for middle grades I have read in a long time. The characters are vividly portrayed, the world of Myrth well thought out and described, and the plot is complex without being difficult to follow. This book bears no reseblance to How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell, even though the titles sound similar. This book is refreshing and thoughtful. Some of the word play in this reminded me of Jasper Fforde. With the colorful descriptions, this book takes a little longer to read than many in the fantasy genre target at grades 5-8. It is well worth the time. This book transports the reader along with Greg Hart to the wonderful world of Myrth. I was a little disappointed in the way the story wrapped up, but it made sense and was just as well described as the rest of the book, but lacked some of the conflict the book had been leading to.
vforcina on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I thought this was a really great book. There are a lot of children's books out that are very predictable or that follow a certain mold, but this is not one. Although I thought the story would turn out a certain way, I was pleasantly surprised. This book is great for kids around the same age as the main character. Even though I'm a little bit (...a lot) older than 7th grade I found myself entertained and rooting for Greg. I look forward to more from the author!
angieanzaldua on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I loved this book it was more than i thought it would be. i loved the chacters and vivid writhing. it woke up my imagination and kept my attention. it is beautifully written and i loved the storyline the plot and i must say i will be reading the next book. my 9 year old loved it she read it faster than i did and she found it to be "very entertaining" she as well cant wait to get her hands on the next one.
leahdawn on LibraryThing 7 months ago
A cute children's story that flips traditional quest story archetypes to create a hilarious, inventive adventure. A great read for kids in late elementary/ early jr.high, or adults who just like a fun book. A little slow-moving in parts, but generally a humorous, charming story.
lostinalibrary on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Twelve-year-old Greg Hart is a great hero, able to defeat any and all monsters and all-round bad guys while still making it home for dinner - at least in the stories he writes. In real life, he is the constant target of bullies, beaten up on a daily basis. One day, as he is running from one such bully, Greg finds himself pulled into a different world called Myrth where he discovers that, according to prophesy, he will slay a dragon and save the princess.Greg tries to convince everyone the prophecy is wrong or, at least, he's not the one it's about, especially as there is already a hero in Myrth named Greatheart - surely, he has to be The Guy of which the prophecy speaks. Unfortunately, almost everyone thinks he's just being modest (so heroic) and unless he fulfills the prophecy, he may never get home. How to Slay a dragon is a fun and funny book aimed at a YA audience. It's chock full of puns and word play that I suspect children will find irresistible. It is the perfect rainy day book - it's charm and humour will keep children glued to the page from beginning to end - and adults will get more than the occasional chuckle out of poor Greg's attempt to prove he's not the hero of prophecy until - well, maybe he is.
GRgenius on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Have you ever heard it's all in what you say...or rather how it's perceived? Mistaken meanings happen EVERY DAY. Online, in person, in text , on the phone, you name it and someone has mistaken the meaning of what someone has said for something completely different...for better or worse. Such is the case here for our young "hero" (champion or sandwich?), Greg Hart of Earth who apparently is the long sought champion-to-be of Myrth in lieu of another by a similar name that happens to fight dragons every other day. (Are you with me so far? Good.) Hmm...interesting coincidence? I don't know....the circumstances under which the prophecy was obtained are rather sketchy to say the least but then again stranger (odd or person?) things have happened.Massively fun word play is the name of the game and it runs amuck throughout the story. Hear and their...or rather HERE and THERE you can find it on almost everyone page; a cornucopia of English class fun if I do say so myself. I can certainly see this working in a classroom setting as a great learning assignment to illustrate proper word usage. But anywho, aside from the nerdy wordy fun, there is the adventure itself.Greg Hart (or is that Greghart as all the people of Myrth believe his name to be?) is a likable character, as is Lucky, Priscilla, and a slue of other friendly types met along the way. Even the not-quite-as-friendly (or helpful) ones are great...like the Witch Hazel (ha, get it?!) and Simon Sezxqrthm (Simon Sez for short....ha!)....each adding a little something special to the story in their own way of course. Every one he encounters on his journey brings a little mischief to the overall prophecy as it unfolds before their eyes and you can guarantee that while being engrossed in thoughts of just what might happen next (and laughing at all the "inside" jokes you uncover), you'll be taken by surprise as the unseen path is followed. It's not a book that leaves its potential outcomes wide open for you to gawk and stare at, no sir. You have selectively pick it out of the proverbial haystack, or merely let it run its course and hold on tight....me, I prefer the second method here.In short (length not height), a wordy adventure into the realm of fantasy steeped with enough action to draw you in and enough word play to keep you thinking (and laughing) along the way. I for one thoroughly enjoyed this romp through the land of Myrth and can not wait for our next chance to visit them once again.
Middlereader More than 1 year ago
I happened onto this book during a free promo and approached it very cautiously. You see, about five percent of the books I find for free do I actually finish—or even get beyond page fifteen. This one looked cute, however, and I was impressed with the sample text, so I settled in for a longer read. It ended up being a wonderful surprise! Within, Greg Hart is about to start seventh grade, and he’s not really looking forward to it. True, he is the fastest kid in his class, but that’s mainly because he’s had so much practice fleeing dangers like Manny Malice. And he’s got a great imagination. His journal is filled with the feats of daring he’s accomplished in his own mind. That’s why he thinks he’s dreaming again when he’s sucked into the land of Myrth. In Myrth, the people live by prophecy. Seriously, it’s almost law that prophecies MUST BE FULFILLED, and the people do everything in their power to see it done. So when Greg Hart finds out he’s the fabled Greghart of prophecy, the Greghart destined to slay the dragon Ruuan and rescue the princess, he’s notably alarmed. But he’s forced into action, accompanied by a young man by the name of Lucky. (“Oh, and I’m Lucky,” the boy in orange added quickly. Greg stared at him dumbly. “Good for you.” “No, I mean my name is Lucky. Short for Luke.” “Actually, it’s longer,” Greg said.) On their journey, they meet a variety of quirky characters: Melvin, spiteful little brother to the legendary dragon-slayer, Marvin; feisty Princess Pricilla, who insists on being called Sasha and sets out to slay the dragon herself; and Bart the Bard, who has an annoying habit of singing ballads of death and destruction just before Greg heads into danger. Together they’re attacked by a bollywomp, chased by falchions, and march to battle against a valley full of “razor teeth” —with Greg protesting all the way. Oddly enough, things do work out, just not at all in the way you’d expect it to. My reaction? Sweet! (As in, I totally loved it!) This book has great characters and great action and adventure. I wasn’t quite as impressed with the settings. (I felt a little bit like I was walking around on a map.) But this is truly one of the funniest books I’ve ever read. Not just turn-up-the-corner-of-your-smile funny, but big-toothy-grin funny, and sometimes even crack-up-out-loud funny. It’s not the type of book you’d want to break open, say, in a crowd of strangers, or during a funeral, or when your teacher’s lecturing. But it’s great for most other times. Here are a few more of my favorite quotes: His name was Manny Malistino, only everyone called him Manny Malice, or better yet, Sir, if they thought he might be listening. Better a live coward than a dead hero, he’d (Greg) always believed. “Get some sleep.” Yes, of course. Wouldn’t want to be tired when I’m killed by the witch. “Now, would you prefer to be roasted, mauled, or eaten?” If ever there was a question that deserved to be rhetorical… “Are there any other choices?” The action, humor and word plays will appeal to the middle school crowd, though there’s absolutely nothing to prevent younger ones from reading. Language and content are perfectly clean. I’d highly recommend it for ages 10+.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
There are so many fantasy books out there in the market today, that it's very, very rare to get your hands on one that is so different from the rest - with so many fun characters and a truly exciting plot - that when it does happen, readers should flock to their bookstores. .And Bill Allen has most definitely begun a series that is completely unique and absolutely "flock-inducing." Greg Hart is the main character of this wonderful story. Greg is a young man who has to look forward to beginning junior high tomorrow, and he's not all that happy about it. In fact, there is a bully at Greg Hart's school who just loves making his life miserable. What Greg is very good at, however, is imagining. Carrying around a journal with him, Greg Hart puts together truly fantastical stories that take him into other worlds where he is the hero who saves the Princess and the Realm, and it's really exhausting imagining you're a hero all the time. While he's writing in his journal, Greg hears the voice of the bully coming through the woods, walking with the girl he dreams about named Kristin. What Greg doesn't want to do is look like an idiot or be teased in front of the prettiest girl in school, so he takes off - running through the woods to get out of the bully's reach. What happens next is something Greg was never counting on. Through a portal he goes, and Greg Hart ends up in the Kingdom of Myrth, headed by King Peter Pendegrass. He's a very amiable king, but he was waiting for a long time for the hero of the prophecy to arrive and he is so happy when Greg lands in his realm. A hysterical assistant to the King named Lucky takes Greg aside and tells him all about the prophecy that one day a hero by the name of Greghart will come and slay the mighty dragon, Ruuan. Of course, Greg knows that they've made a mistake and TRIES to tell them so but.no deal. Everyone in the realm believes wholeheartedly that Greg Hart is Greghart. The quest for the dragon involves a mysterious amulet, a Wiccan woman by the name of Witch Hazel, monkey dogs, trees that move, and a family of dragon-slayers that Greg desperately wants on his side. Every part of this story is extremely satisfying. The dialogue is hysterical, and watching Greg Hart battle his way through the death-defying tasks is a plot worth reading! Quill Says: A fantasy novel that FINALLY stands out from the pack! Bill Allen has done an incredible job of bringing the land of Myrth to life, leaving the reader truly excited about the next great adventure.
vforcina More than 1 year ago
I thought this was a really great book. There are a lot of children's books out that are very predictable or that follow a certain mold, but this is not one. Although I thought the story would turn out a certain way, I was pleasantly surprised. This book is great for kids around the same age as the main character. Even though I'm a little bit (...a lot) older than 7th grade I found myself entertained and rooting for Greg. I look forward to more from the author!
harstan More than 1 year ago
If one was betting on a fight between twelve-year-old Greg Hart and the smaller girls at school, the latter females would be the odds-on favorites. Don't even bother putting up odds for him against the bigger girls. However, the desperate Myrth mages except for seemingly skeptical Mordred believe Greg is a prophesized warrior. They transport the seventh grader to their world. His mission is to rescue King Peter's daughter Princess Penelope from Ruuan the mightiest dragon. Greg tries to explain he has spent years running from bullies like Manny the Malice who is much smaller than the fiery dragon; but the magicians insist he is the exalted hero foretold in prophecy and everyone knows that prophecies always occur; that is everyone but the geek from earth who keeps saying he writes heroic epics not stars in heroic epics; of course he has experience with dragons like the algebra teacher. With a nod to the amusing How to Train Your Dragon, How to Slay a Dragon is a wonderful quest fantasy starring the last person one would expect to wear the mantle of prophesized hero saving the world from a powerful dragon. Fast-paced, middle school students will enjoy Greg the geeky tweener as he is sent forth as the reluctant hero to battle a bullying dragon. Harriet Klausner