ISBN-10:
1591477433
ISBN-13:
9781591477433
Pub. Date:
01/28/2007
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing / Edition 1

How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing / Edition 1

by Paul J. Silvia
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781591477433
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Publication date: 01/28/2007
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 149
Product dimensions: 5.04(w) x 7.96(h) x 0.35(d)

Table of Contents


Preface     xi
Introduction     3
Specious Barriers to Writing a Lot     11
Motivational Tools     29
Starting Your Own Agraphia Group     49
A Brief Foray Into Style     59
Writing Journal Articles     77
Writing Books     109
"The Good Things Still to Be Written"     127
Good Books About Writing     133
References     137
Index     143
About the Author     149

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How to Write a Lot 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
mdreid on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is an enjoyable read with a simple message: if you want to write a lot, schedule (don't "find") time and write. Hung off this piece of advice is a whole lot of motivational tips and background that appear to be backed up by psychological research and other guides to writing.On one level the book worked for me: I have set myself a writing schedule and goals. Any and every counter-argument I had for not doing so was utterly demolished in the open chapters. Judging by how often this advice is repeated throughout the book I'm sure that this will be considered a success by the author. So: Mission Accomplished.Unfortunately, I feel that the book loses its way somewhat in the later chapters. The advice on style is way too cursory to help¿which is a shame since Silvia has a very punchy and effective style¿and the tips for writing journal articles and books are too firmly couched within the author's field of psychology.So, on balance, the book is short, cheap, easy and effective read. If you are floundering with writing you could do worse than read this book.
noodlejet22 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An enjoyable little book that helped me realize that all the reasons I say I can't write are really excuses that can be fixed by creating a schedule and practicing often. Glad i'm not in denial anymore :-)
aarondesk on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Short easy read. Basic idea - schedule time to write.
kbwilson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Wonderful little book for all academic writers...
MaryWJ on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
EXCELLENT book!! Really good, straight-forward advice about academic writing. Highly recommended!!
clews-reviews on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is usefully short and can be summarized further:1. Make a schedule with several blocks of writing time per week, ideally every workday, stick to it, and keep track of your success at doing so.2. Make concrete goals for upcoming blocks of time (examples, p. 32, e.g. "Make an outline for chapter 4", "Correct page proofs and mail them back".)3. Write first, revise later.4. Assume you'll be rejected, write your best anyway.There are good-enough-to-get-going chapters on writing clearly, outlining effectively, etc. The author is a psychologist, so is likely to provide evidence or citations for advice on how people work: the biggest point being that writing to a schedule is more productive than waiting for deadlines or, worse, inspiration.I also liked a comment on what makes a good review article: "A problem-solving review describes a problem ... and proposes a solution (such as a new theory, model, or interpretation). A problem-finding review develops new concepts and identifies topics that deserve more attention. Good review articles involve both problem solving and problem finding." (Cf. Sawyer, Explaining creativity, 2006).
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bfertig on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is essentially drivel. The main message of this book is: allocate time, put coffee in mug, sit butt to chair, flap fingers on keyboard. The author makes no qualms about the lack of distinction between writing quantity vs. quality. Given the odds, if there is enough quantity, some of it will get published and over time this will result in having written a lot. If this is all one cares about, then this book will serve its purpose.