ISBN-10:
3540699287
ISBN-13:
9783540699286
Pub. Date:
09/13/2010
Publisher:
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
How to Write Technical Reports: Understandable Structure, Good Design, Convincing Presentation / Edition 1

How to Write Technical Reports: Understandable Structure, Good Design, Convincing Presentation / Edition 1

by Lutz Hering, Heike Hering

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Overview

Technical Reports are usually written according to general standards, corporate - sign standards of the current university or company, logical rules and practical - periences. These rules are not known well enough among engineers. There are many books that give general advice in writing. This book is specialised in how to write Technical Reports and addresses not only engineers, but also natural sci- th tists, computer scientists, etc. It is based on the 6 edition published in 2008 by st Vieweg in German and is now published as 1 edition by Springer in English. Both authors of the German edition have long experience in educating en- neers at the University of Applied Sciences Hannover. They have held many l- tures where students had to write reports and took notes about all positive and negative examples that occurred in design reports, lab work reports, and in theses. Prof. Dr. Lutz Hering has worked for VOLKSWAGEN and DAIMLER and then changed to the University of Applied Sciences Hannover where he worked from 1974 until 2000. He held lectures on Technical Drawing, Construction and Design, CAD and Materials Science. Dr. Heike Hering worked nine years as a Technical Writer and was responsible for many CAD manuals in German and English. She is now employed at TÜV NORD Akademie, where she is responsible for E-Learning projects, technical documentation and software training and supervises students who are writing their theses. Prof. Dr. -Ing.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783540699286
Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Publication date: 09/13/2010
Edition description: 2010
Pages: 304
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

1 Introduction 1

2 Planning the Technical Report 5

2.1 General overview of all required work steps 5

2.2 Accepting and analyzing the task 6

2.3 Checking or creating the title 7

2.4 The structure as the "backbone" of the Technical Report 10

2.4.1 General information about structure and table of contents 11

2.4.2 Rules for the structure in ISO 2145 12

2.4.3 Logic and formal design of document part headings 13

2.4.4 Work steps to create a structure and example structures 16

2.4.5 General structure patterns for Technical Reports 22

2.5 Project notebook (jotter) 26

2.6 The style guide advances consistency in wording and design 26

3 Writing and creating the Technical Report 29

3.1 Parts of the Technical Report and their layout 30

3.1.1 Front cover sheet and title leaf 31

3.1.2 Structure with page numbers = Table of Contents (ToC) 37

3.1.3 Text with figures, tables, and literature citations 43

3.1.4 List of references 45

3.1.5 Other required or useful parts 46

3.2 Collecting and ordering the material 51

3.3 Creating good tables 53

3.3.1 Table design 54

3.3.2 Table numbering and table headings 58

3.3.3 The morphological box - a special table 61

3.3.4 Hints for evaluation tables 66

3.3.5 Tabular re-arrangement of text 69

3.4 Instructional figures 70

3.4.1 Understandable design of instructional figures 73

3.4.2 Figure numbering and figure subheadings 77

3.4.3 Photo, photocopy, digital photo, scan and image from the interest 81

3.4.4 Using graphics software and CAD programs 86

3.4.5 Scheme and diagram (chart) 89

3.4.6 The sketch as simplified drawing and illustration of computations 99

3.4.7 Perspective drawing 101

3.4.8 Technical drawing and bill of materials (parts list) 103

3.4.9 Mind map 109

3.4.10 Pictorial re-arrangement of text 110

3.5 Literature citations 112

3.5.1 Introductory remarks on literature citations 112

3.5.2 Reasons for literature citations 113

3.5.3 Bibliographical data according to ISO 690 and ISO 690-2 113

3.5.4 Citations in the text 114

3.5.5 The list of references-contents and layout 121

3.5.6 Working with documents written in foreign languages 135

3.5.7 Copyright and copyright laws 135

3.6 The text of the Technical Report 139

3.6.1 Good writing style in general texts 140

3.6.2 Good writing style in Technical Reports 141

3.6.3 Formulas and computations 143

3.6.4 Understandable Writing in Technical Reports 148

3.7 Using word processing and desktop publishing (DTP) systems 152

3.7.1 Document or page layout resp. and hints on editing 153

3.7.2 Typographic details according to good general practice 161

3.7.3 Details about text accentuations 165

3.7.4 Automatic creation of indexes, tables, lists, labels and cross-references with Word 166

3.7.5 Text editing with OpenOffice Writer 172

3.8 Creating slides with presentation graphics programs 175

3.8.1 Slide creation with PowerPoint 175

3.8.2 Slide creation with Open Office Impress 178

3.9 Completion of the Technical Report 179

3.9.1 The report checklist assures quality and completeness 179

3.9.2 Proof-reading and text correction according to ISO 5776 181

3.9.3 Creating and printing the copy originals and end check 186

3.9.4 Exporting the Technical Report to HTML or PDF for publication 189

3.9.5 Copying, binding or stapling the Technical Report and distribution 191

4 Useful behavior for working on your project and writing the Technical Report 201

4.1 Working together with the supervisor or customer 201

4.2 Working together in a team 203

4.3 Advice for working in the library 204

4.4 Organizing your paperwork 205

4.5 Organizing your file structure and back-up copies 207

4.6 Personal working methodology 210

5 Presenting the Technical Report 215

5.1 Introduction 215

5.1.1 Target areas university and industrial practice 215

5.1.2 What is it all about? 216

5.1.3 What is my benefit? 216

5.1.4 How do I proceed? 217

5.2 Why presentations? 218

5.2.1 Definitions 218

5.2.2 Presentation types and presentation targets 219

5.2.3 "Risks and side effects" of presentation and lectures 220

5.3 Planning the presentation 222

5.3.1 Required work steps and their time consumption 222

5.3.2 Step 1: Defining the presentation framework and target 224

5.3.3 Step 2: Material collection 229

5.3.4 Step 3: The creative phase 229

5.4 Creating the presentation 235

5.4.1 General Recommendations for designing presentation slides 236

5.4.2 Step 4: Summarizing the text and working out the details 241

5.4.3 Step 5: Visualization and manuscript 243

5.4.4 Step 6: Trial presentation and changes 256

5.4.5 Step 7: Updating the presentation and preparations in the room 257

5.4.6 Step 8: Lecture, presentation 259

5.5 Giving the presentation 259

5.5.1 Contact preparations and contacting the audience 259

5.5.2 Creating a relationship with the audience 260

5.5.3 Appropriate pointing 261

5.5.4 Dealing with intermediate questions 262

5.6 Review and analysis of the presentation 263

5.7 57 Rhetoric tips from A to Z 266

6 Summary 271

7 References 273

A Lists of figures, tables and checklists 279

A.1 Figures 279

A.2 Tables 281

A.3 Checklists 282

B Glossary - terms of printing technology 283

C Index 293

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