Howards End

Howards End

by E. M. Forster
3.6 68

NOOK BookDigitized from 1921 volume (eBook - Digitized from 1921 volume)

FREE
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

Howards End by E. M. Forster

'To me,' D. H. Lawerence once wrote to E. M. forster, 'you are the last Englishman.' Indeed, Forster's novels offer contemporary readers clear, vibrant portraits of life in Edwardian England. Published in 1908 to both critical and popular acclaim, A Room with a View is a whimsical comedy of manners that owes more to Jane Austen that perhaps any other of his works. The central character is a muddled young girl named Lucy Honeychurch, who runs away from the man who stirs her emotions, remaining engaged to a rich snob. Forster considered it his 'nicest' novel, and today it remains probably his most well liked. Its moral is utterly simple. Throw away your etiquette book and listen to your heart. But it was Forster's next book, Howards End, a story about who would inhabit a charming old country house (and who, in a larger sense, would inherit England), that earned him recognition as a major writer. Centered around the conflict between the wealthy, materialistic Wilcox family and the cultured, idealistic Schlegel sisters-and informed by Forester's famous dictum 'Only connect'-it is full of tenderness towards favorite characters. 'Howards End is a classic English novel . . . superb and wholly cherishable . . . one that admirers have no trouble reading over and over again,' said Alfred Kazin.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940019506507
Publisher: New York, Vintage Books
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 629 KB

About the Author

Edward Morgan Forster was born January 1, 1879 in London and was raised from infancy by his mother and paternal aunts after his father's death. Forster’s boyhood experiences at the Tonbridge School, Kent were an unpleasant contrast to the happiness he found at home, and his suffering left him with an abiding dislike of the English public school system. At King’s College, Cambridge, however he was able to pursue freely his varied interests in philosophy, literature and Mediterranean civilization, and he soon determined to devote his life to writing.

His first two novels, Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905) and The Longest Journey (1907), were both poorly received, and it was not until the publication of Howards End, in 1910, that Forster achieved his first major success as a novelist, with the work many considered his finest creation.

Forster first visited India during 1912 and 1913, and after three years as a noncombatant in Alexandria, Egypt, during World War I and several years in England, he returned for an extended visit in 1921. From those experiences came his most celebrated novel, A Passage to India, his darkest and most probing work and perhaps the best novel about India written by a foreigner.

As a man of letters , Forster was honored during and after World War II for his resistance to any and all forms of tyranny and totalitarianism, and King’s College awarded him a permanent fellowship in 1949. Forster spent his later years at Cambridge writing and teaching, and died at Coventry, England, on June 7, 1970. His novel, Maurice, written several decades earlier, was published posthumously in 1971.

Date of Birth:

January 1, 1879

Date of Death:

June 7, 1970

Place of Birth:

London

Place of Death:

Coventry, England

Education:

B. A. in classics, King's College, Cambridge, 1900; B. A. in history, 1901; M.A., 1910

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Howards End (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 68 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't usually have an issue getting into books but reading this was a new experience. It was more like reading about the lives of three families in a casual way than an actual storyline. There is a lot of interaction between the characters and a lot of discussion about how society is changing. As far as classics go I feel like the time period it is taking place is no longer victorian but it is still before world war 1, I have not read a lot of books that take place in this time period. The whole time I read this book I didn't really like it, the relationships seemed trifling and were uninteresting to me, but now that I have finished I keep thinking about this book for some reason.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A couple of typos are to be expected, but they are EVERYWHERE! Impossible to get through without losing patience. Don't buy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An previous reviewer mistakenly attributed "Remains of the Day" to E.M. Forster. While this work shares similarities with "Howards End", "Remains of the Day" was written by Kazuo Ishiguro, a Japanese-British author who was born in 1954. E.M. Forster lived 1879-1970. However, I still highly recommend "Remains of the Day" as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just finished the book. It was a drag, more than once i almost gave up. It's boring, goes nowhere , has no one character likeable. I thought that a book named Howards End would be the place where most of the story happens...never!!! here and there mentions of it. But the plot takes place somewhere else. Some chapters seems like a eternal rant from the author, those i just skipped ...couldn't take it . When the character Leonard is introduced in the story seems that would be a non important one because disappeared half the book and it's re introduced chapters later as if nothing has happened before. The chapters where Leonards is on it's an long ,long and boring rant that makes no sense . i stopped trying to understand what i was reading when i realized(by reading other reviews) that there is some philosophical stuff inserted in the conversations. So forget it. I hope that the movie version of this "classic" is better and understandable. The fact that this book is on the Classic Shelve does not make it good or worht the reading. if you must reading for homework, brace yourself it is going to be a long day before you see the end of Howards End....and if you do read it for pleasure....just read until page 100 (which is my personal mark for when i decide if i should conitnue or not reading a book that it's giving a hard time to get through it ) and decide if you continue or not. it is not worth your time .
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A brilliant novel. One of my favorites.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The typos made a challenging book even more difficult to read. The story was interesting enough, but the characters were difficult to relate to.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lisa Martell More than 1 year ago
Excellent read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago