HP Certified : HP-UX System Administration

HP Certified : HP-UX System Administration

by Rafeeq Ur Rehman

Hardcover

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Overview

The all-in-one authorized reference for HP certified, HP-UX system administration certification!

If you are preparing for HP Certified, HP-UX System Administration certification, here's your all-in-one, authorized reference and preparation guide! The only preparation book approved by HP Education, HP Certified, HP-UX System Administration covers every exam objective in HP's three-part HP-UX System Administration exam (3HO-002). Best of all, this comprehensive book won't just help you prepare for the exam: it'll help you manage your systems for maximum efficiency today, tomorrow, and for years to come! Coverage includes all this, and more:

  • UNIX and HP-UX fundamentals: installation, startup, logins, shells, processes, file systems, and more
  • Managing users, groups, and accounts
  • Security, auditing, performance management, and optimization
  • HP-UX networking: configuring LAN devices, IP addresses, NFS, DNS, NIS, and more
  • Printing, backup, storage management, kernel patches, peripherals, and more
  • Essential shell programming and job automation techniques

HP Certified: HP-UX System Administration contains detailed lists of exam objectives, summaries of key points and challenging review questions after every chapter, plus a complete sample exam. If you run HP-UX, this book is all you need to get certified. Even better, it's all you need to get results.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780130183743
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 05/31/2000
Series: Hewlett-Packard Professional Books Series
Pages: 832
Product dimensions: 7.24(w) x 9.55(h) x 1.88(d)

About the Author


Rafeeq Ur Rehman is an HP Certified System Administrator, MCSE, and CCNA. He has over eight years of experience in UNIX system administration and four years with Windows NT He is also an experienced C and database programmer.

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

I have tried to write a book that covers all HP-UX system and networking administration concepts. The book is divided into three parts. The first part consists of Chapters 1-11. It covers general UNIX concepts, user commands, and shell programming. The second part of the book covers HP-UX system administration and consists of Chapters 12-25. The third part consists of Chapters 26-36 and is dedicated to computer networking concepts and HP-UX network administration tasks. The book is divided into these three parts according to requirements of the HP-UX certification examination. This is also quite a logical way to present the material to a UNIX system administrator. At the end of each chapter, you will find chapter review questions to check your understanding of the material presented in the chapter. There are some sample test questions under "Test Your Knowledge," which will provide you an idea of which type of questions are going to be asked in the actual exam. I have tried to use a combination of simple and difficult questions in this part. Answers to the review questions are provided in Appendix A, and answers to the sample test questions are available in Appendix B.

While writing this book, I have tried to explain all system administration concepts in reasonable detail. Many examples are presented in each section of a chapter to help the user understand what happens when a particular command is executed. Commonly used command-line switches are also listed wherever appropriate. You will also find many screen shots showing what happens when you select a menu or press a button in the GUI windows. I have also tried to explain each system andnetwork administration task using both command-line utilities and System Administration Manager (SAM). Most "old-fashioned" people would like to carry out many tasks using the command-line interface, which is also very important for passing the HP-UX certification examination.

The book is organized such that it progresses from simple-to-understand concepts to more-difficult and complicated ones. The same strategy is also implemented in each chapter. Figures, tables, and examples are presented wherever helpful to communicate the concept. The first few chapters contain more examples than the later ones to give a user a good start.

Another consideration in the organization of the book is logical relevance and order of the chapters. If an idea or concept depends on another concept, it is placed later in the book.

This book is intended to be the most comprehensive book on HP-UX. It not only covers the HP-UX certification exam, but it also serves as a reference book for even the most experienced HP-UX system administrators. The first part is designed with the most basic concepts so that anybody who is new to HP-UX can get the full benefit. The next two parts cover more-complicated system and network administration tasks. Both novice and experienced users will find interesting things here.

Part 1: Fundamentals of UNIX Systems

The first part is an introduction to the UNIX system. This is a more-general UNIX part and consists of login and logout procedure, file and directory manipulation, file editing, an introduction to the POSIX shell, and file security/permissions. This part shows the concepts of users and groups, which are common to all UNIX systems. UNIX commands related to all these topics are presented and the more commonly used options of these commands are discussed. This part also throws light on standard input/output and I/O redirection. Chapters 10 and 11 introduce shell programming concepts. Here you will find a number of shell programs, up to elaborate shell variables and flow control structures.

Part 2: HP-UX System Administration

The second part is the core HP-UX system administration part of the book. It fully covers all issues from the installation of HP-UX to managing devices, security, and system performance. The part starts with an introduction to System Administration Manager (SAM), which is a comprehensive HP-UX tool meant for system administration. Installation of HP-UX on a server or workstation is presented next. After that, you will gradually progress from basic to more-complex system configuration tasks, building a kernel, managing devices, adding/removing users, and concepts of the HP-UX file system.

Part 3: HP-UX Network Administration

The third part covers HP-UX network administration. It also contains general networking concepts such as the ISO-OSI reference model and TCP/IP networking. One chapter is dedicated to ARPA/Berkeley services. Then NFS, NIS, DNS, and NTP are covered.

How to Register for the HP-UX Certification Examination

You can register for the examination by calling Sylvan Prometric at 1-800-755-EXAM or directly at Website ...

Table of Contents

Foreword xxxv
Preface xxxvii
Acknowledgments xli
PART ONE Fundamentals of the UNIX System 1(198)
Getting Started with UNIX
3(18)
UNIX Shells
4(1)
Logging In and Out of HP-UX
5(3)
The Superuser
5(1)
Logging In
5(1)
Shell Prompts
6(1)
Logging Out
7(1)
Home Directory
8(1)
Using HP-UX Commands
8(3)
Extrinsic and Intrinsic Commands
9(1)
Changing Your Password
9(1)
Shell History and Repeating Commands
10(1)
Command Aliases
11(1)
Shell Startup Files
11(1)
System Startup File
11(1)
User Startup File
12(1)
Some Simple HP-UX Commands
12(9)
Where Am I?
13(1)
What Is the Current Date and Time?
13(1)
Who Are Others and Who Am I?
13(1)
What Is the Name of My System?
14(1)
Printing Banners
14(1)
The Calendar
15(1)
Getting Help with Manual Pages
15(1)
Executing Multiple Commands on One Line
16(1)
Options and Arguments
17(1)
Chapter Summary
17(1)
Chapter Review Questions
17(1)
Test Your Knowledge
18(3)
Working with Files and Directories
21(20)
Basic Operations on Files
22(3)
Creating a File
22(1)
Listing Files
23(1)
Deleting Files
24(1)
Displaying Contents of a Text File
24(1)
File Naming Rules
25(1)
General Guidelines for File Names
25(1)
Hidden Files
26(1)
Working with Directories
26(4)
Creating Directories
26(1)
Deleting Directories
27(1)
Understanding Directory Structure
28(1)
Moving Around in a Directory Tree
29(1)
Copying and Moving Files
30(2)
Copying Files
30(1)
Moving and Renaming Files
31(1)
Wildcards
32(1)
Use of*
32(1)
Use of?
32(1)
Use of [] Wildcard
33(1)
File Types
33(2)
A Text File
33(1)
A Directory
34(1)
An Executable File
34(1)
A Shared Library
34(1)
A Shell Script
34(1)
Searching File Contents
35(1)
Searching a Word
35(1)
Searching Multiple Words
35(1)
Searching a String in Multiple Files
36(1)
Finding Files
36(1)
Miscellaneous File Handling Commands
36(5)
The Head and the Tail
36(1)
Counting Characters, Words, and Lines in a Text File
37(1)
Link Files
38(1)
Chapter Summary
38(1)
Chapter Review Questions
39(1)
Test Your Knowledge
39(2)
Environment Variables
41(14)
Environment and Shell Variables
42(1)
Setting and Displaying Variables
43(5)
Listing All Variables
44(1)
Variable Containing More Than One Word
45(1)
Modifying a Variable
46(1)
Single- and Double-Quote Characters
47(1)
Removing a Variable
47(1)
Assigning Output of a Command to a Variable
47(1)
Predefined Environment Variables
48(2)
Exporting Shell Variables
50(1)
Setting the Command Prompt
50(1)
Adding Useful Information to the Prompt
51(1)
The PATH Variable
51(4)
Chapter Summary
52(1)
Chapter Review Questions
52(1)
Test Your Knowledge
53(2)
Input/Output Redirection and Pipes
55(18)
Redirecting Standard Output
57(4)
Joining Two or More Files
59(1)
Appending to a File
59(1)
Redirecting Standard Output to Devices
60(1)
Redirecting Standard Input
61(1)
Redirecting Standard Error
62(1)
Redirecting Standard Input, Output, and Standard Error Simultaneously
63(2)
Pipes and How They Are Used
65(4)
Use of Pipes as Filters
66(2)
Use of Pipes for Data Manipulation
68(1)
The T-Junction
69(4)
Chapter Summary
70(1)
Chapter Review Questions
71(1)
Test Your Knowledge
71(2)
Using the vi Editor
73(14)
Modes Used in vi
74(1)
Starting and Stopping vi
75(2)
Cursor Movement
77(1)
Inserting and Deleting Text
78(1)
Replacing Text
79(1)
Undo and Redo
80(1)
Scrolling Text
80(1)
Search and Replace
80(1)
Cut, Copy, and Paste
81(1)
Importing and Exporting Text
82(1)
Importing a Disk File into Editor
82(1)
Exporting Text from the Current File
83(1)
Configuring vi Options
83(4)
Chapter Summary
84(1)
Chapter Review Questions
84(1)
Test Your Knowledge
84(3)
Regular Expressions
87(12)
How a Command Is Executed
88(1)
Position Specifiers
88(4)
Use of $
89(1)
Use of ∧
90(1)
Getting Rid of Blank Lines
91(1)
Escaping Position Specifiers
92(1)
Meta Characters
92(3)
Use of the Asterisk * Character
93(1)
Use of the Dot (.) Character
93(1)
Use of Range Characters [...]
94(1)
Use of the Word Delimiters \<and\>
95(1)
Standard and Extended Regular Expressions
95(4)
Chapter Summary
96(1)
Chapter Review Questions
96(1)
Test Your Knowledge
97(2)
File Permissions
99(20)
Who Are UNIX Users
100(1)
Types of File Permissions
101(3)
Importance of Read Permission
102(1)
Left-to-Right Rule of File Permissions
103(1)
Directory Permissions
104(1)
Modifying File Permissions
104(3)
Modifying File Permissions Using Symbolic Modes
104(2)
Changing File Permissions Using Octal Numbers
106(1)
Default File Permissions
107(1)
Changing the Owner and Group of a File
108(1)
Special File Permissions
109(2)
SETUID and SETGID
110(1)
Sticky Bit
111(1)
Finding Files Having a Particular Set of File Permissions
111(1)
Access Control Lists
112(1)
Listing ACL
112(1)
Changing ACL
113(1)
Miscellaneous Commands
113(6)
The newgrp Command
113(1)
The su Command
113(1)
The id Command
114(1)
Chapter Summary
114(1)
Chapter Review Questions
115(1)
Test Your Knowledge
116(3)
UNIX File System Hierarchy
119(16)
Static and Dynamic Files
120(1)
The Root Directory (/)
121(1)
The Device Directory (/dev)
122(1)
The /etc Directory
123(1)
The Home Directory (/home)
124(1)
The System Binary Directory (/sbin)
124(1)
The /stand Directory
125(1)
The /net Directory
126(1)
The Application Directory (/opt)
126(1)
The Temporary File Directory (/tmp)
127(1)
The /user Directory
127(1)
/usr/bin
127(1)
/usr/contrib
128(1)
/usr/include
128(1)
/usr/lib
128(1)
/usr/sbin
128(1)
/usr/share/man
128(1)
The Variable Files Directory (/var)
128(1)
Log Files
128(1)
Spool Files (/var/spool)
129(1)
Temporary var files (/var/tmp)
129(1)
The lost+found Directory
129(1)
Some Useful Commands Related to File System Hierarchy
130(5)
The which Command
130(1)
The whereis Command
130(1)
More on man Command
130(1)
Chapter Summary
131(1)
Chapter Review Questions
132(1)
Test Your Knowledge
132(3)
Working with the POSIX Shell and Job Control
135(16)
POSIX Shell Capabilities
136(2)
Shell and Subshell
137(1)
Controlling Resources (ulimit)
137(1)
File Name Completion
138(1)
History and Reentering Commands
139(1)
Command Line Editing
140(1)
Substitution
141(1)
Variable Substitution
141(1)
Command Substitution
141(1)
Tilde Substitution
141(1)
Setting Terminal Parameters
142(1)
Job Control
143(8)
Foreground and Background Jobs
144(1)
Suspending a Foreground Job
145(1)
Resuming Suspended Jobs and Bringing Background Jobs to the Foreground
145(1)
Moving Jobs to the Background
146(1)
Stopping a Running Job
147(1)
Waiting for Background Jobs to Finish
147(1)
Chapter Summary
147(1)
Chapter Review Questions
148(1)
Test Your Knowledge
148(3)
Introduction to Shell Programming
151(28)
Anatomy of a Shell Program
152(5)
Which Subshell Will Execute It?
153(1)
Comments in a Shell Program
154(1)
Commands and Control Structures
154(1)
Steps for Creating a Shell Program
155(1)
Debugging Shell Programs
156(1)
Using Variables
157(3)
Passing Data Through Environment Variables
158(2)
Command Line Arguments
160(2)
Using Command Line Arguments, or Positional Parameters
160(1)
The shift Command
161(1)
Interactive Shell Programs
162(2)
The read Command
162(1)
The echo Command
163(1)
Exit Codes
164(1)
The test Command
165(2)
Testing Numeric Values
165(1)
Testing String Values
166(1)
Testing Files
166(1)
Testing with Logical Operators
167(1)
Branching
167(12)
The if-then-fi Structure
167(2)
The if-then-else-fi Structure
169(2)
The case Structure
171(3)
Chapter Summary
174(1)
Chapter Review Questions
175(1)
Test Your Knowledge
176(3)
Advanced Shell Programming
179(20)
Arithmetic and Logic Operations
180(2)
Explicit Mode let Command
180(1)
Implicit Mode let Command
181(1)
The while-do-done Loop
182(3)
The until-do-done Loop
185(1)
The for-do-done Loop
186(4)
Breaking a Loop
190(2)
The break Command
190(1)
The continue Command
191(1)
The exit Command
191(1)
Text Processing
192(7)
Using sed
192(1)
Using cut
193(1)
The sleep Command
194(1)
Chapter Summary
194(2)
Chapter Review Questions
196(1)
Test Your Knowledge
196(3)
PART TWO HP-UX System Administration 199(290)
The System Administration Manager
201(14)
Why Use SAM?
202(1)
Starting and Stopping SAM
203(3)
Starting and Stopping SAM in Text Mode
203(2)
Starting and Stopping SAM in GUI
205(1)
A Sample SAM Session
206(4)
Creating a New User
206(4)
SAM Log Files
210(2)
Restricted Use of SAM by Non-Root Users
212(3)
Chapter Summary
213(1)
Chapter Review Questions
213(1)
Test Your Knowledge
213(2)
Installing HP-UX
215(28)
Introduction to HP Workstations and Servers
216(1)
Installing HP-UX
217(5)
Guided Installation
222(2)
Advanced Installation
224(3)
Initial System Configuration
227(16)
Postinstallation Tasks
238(1)
Chapter Summary
239(1)
Chapter Review Questions
240(1)
Test Your Knowledge
240(3)
System Startup and Shutdown
243(28)
Introduction to the Boot Process
245(4)
Processor Dependent Code
249(4)
PDC Menus
250(1)
Searching Boot Devices
251(1)
Booting from an Alternate Disk
251(1)
Stable Storage
252(1)
Booting in Single-User Mode
252(1)
Boot Area on the System Disk
253(1)
Commands Related to the LIF Area
253(1)
Initial System Loader
254(2)
Secondary Loader
254(2)
Loading the HP-UX Kernel
256(1)
Swapper Process
256(1)
/sbin/pre_init_rc File
256(1)
The init Process
256(3)
/etc/inittab File
256(1)
Initialization of I/O Devices with ioinit
257(1)
The /sbin/bcheckrc Script
257(1)
The /sbin/rc Script
258(1)
Sample /etc/inittab
258(1)
Runlevels
259(1)
Changing Runlevel
259(1)
Determine Current Runlevel
260(1)
Adding a Program to Run at Boot Time
260(2)
Sequencer Directories
261(1)
Configuration Files
262(1)
System Shutdown
262(9)
Shutdown and Reboot Commands
265(1)
The shutdown.allow File
265(1)
Chapter Summary
266(1)
Chapter Review Questions
267(1)
Test Your Knowledge
267(4)
Software and Patch Management
271(24)
Software Packaging Structure
272(2)
Filesets
272(1)
Subproducts
273(1)
Products
273(1)
Bundles
273(1)
Software Depots
274(1)
Listing Installed Software
274(2)
Installing New Software
276(8)
Phases of Software Installation
280(1)
Install/Update Log File
280(2)
Installing Protected Software Using Codewords
282(1)
SD-UX Daemon and Agent
283(1)
Installed Product Database
284(1)
Removing Software
284(1)
Finding and Removing Unused Filesets
284(1)
Verifying Installed Software
285(1)
Managing Software Depots
285(1)
Adding Packages to a Depot
285(1)
Removing Packages from a Depot
285(1)
Listing Packages in a Depot
286(1)
HP-UX Patches
286(2)
Patch Sources
287(1)
Types of Patches
287(1)
Listing Installed Patches
288(1)
Installing and Removing Patches
288(3)
Obtaining Patches
288(2)
Creating a Patch Depot
290(1)
Installing Patches
290(1)
Removing Patches
291(1)
SD-UX Commands
291(4)
Chapter Summary
292(1)
Chapter Review Questions
293(1)
Test Your Knowledge
293(2)
Reconfiguring the HP-UX Kernel
295(22)
Why Reconfigure the Kernel?
296(2)
Adding or Removing Device Drivers
296(1)
Adding or Removing a Subsystem
297(1)
Changing Swap or Dump Devices
297(1)
Modifying System Parameters
297(1)
The Reconfiguration Process
298(8)
Preparing a New System Configuration File
298(7)
Compiling the Kernel
305(1)
Installing New Kernel and Configuration Files
305(1)
Rebooting the System
305(1)
Kernel Rebuilding in a Nutshell
306(1)
Booting from the Old Kernel
307(1)
Common Kernel Tunable Parameters
308(1)
Using SAM to Reconfigure the Kernel
309(8)
Chapter Summary
313(1)
Chapter Review Questions
313(1)
Test Your Knowledge
314(3)
Peripheral Devices
317(20)
Devices and Physical Paths
318(4)
Common Types of Device Adapters
319(1)
Hardware Paths
320(2)
Device Files
322(3)
Devices Directory Hierarchy
323(1)
Major and Minor Numbers
323(1)
Character Devices
324(1)
Block Devices
324(1)
SCSI Device File Naming Convention
325(2)
Disk Naming
326(1)
Tape Devices
326(1)
Listing Installed Devices
327(3)
Using the ll Command
328(1)
Using the ioscan Command
328(1)
Using the lssf Command
329(1)
Usable Devices
329(1)
Creating Device Files
330(3)
Autoconfiguration
330(1)
Using the insf Command
330(1)
Using the mksf Command
331(1)
Using the mknod Command
332(1)
Using SAM
332(1)
Installing a New Device
333(1)
Terminals and Modems
334(3)
Chapter Summary
334(1)
Chapter Review Questions
335(1)
Test Your Knowledge
335(2)
HP-UX File Systems and Logical Volume Manager
337(36)
Disk Devices and Their Configuration
338(1)
Introduction to Logical Volume Manager
339(2)
The Whole-Disk Approach
339(1)
The Logical Volume Manager Approach
339(2)
Listing and Creating Logical Volumes
341(10)
Listing Physical Volumes
342(2)
Listing Volume Groups
344(3)
Listing Logical Volumes
347(1)
Creating Physical Volumes
348(1)
Creating Volume Groups
349(1)
Creating Logical Volumes
350(1)
LVM Data Structure
351(1)
Introduction to File Systems
351(2)
File System Types
352(1)
More on Hard and Soft Links
352(1)
The High-Performance File System
353(1)
HFS Blocks
354(1)
HFS Fragments
354(1)
The Jounaled File System
354(1)
Creating a New File System
355(2)
File System Creation Process
355(1)
Creating a File System with the newfs Command
356(1)
Mounting and Unmounting a File System
357(3)
Automatic Mounting at Startup
358(1)
Sample /etc/fstab File
359(1)
Managing a File System
360(7)
Monitoring Disk Usage
360(1)
Extending Volume Groups
361(1)
Extending Logical Volumes
361(1)
Extending File Systems
362(1)
Using SAM for LVM Administration
362(5)
File System Repair
367(1)
Repairing a File System Using the fsck Command
367(1)
Important LVM Commands
368(5)
Chapter Summary
369(1)
Chapter Review Questions
370(1)
Test Your Knowledge
371(2)
User and Group Management
373(16)
Managing Users
374(3)
Creating Users
374(2)
Deleting Users
376(1)
Modifying a User
377(1)
User Inactivity and Expiration
377(1)
Managing Groups
377(2)
Standard Groups
378(1)
Creating, Deleting and Modifying Groups
378(1)
Multiple Group Membership
378(1)
The Password File (/etc/passwd)
379(1)
The Group File (/etc/group)
380(2)
Restricted User Access
381(1)
Verifying Consistency of Password and Group Files
381(1)
The Skeleton Directory (/etc/skel)
382(1)
Using SAM for User and Group Management
382(7)
User Templates
385(1)
Chapter Summary
385(1)
Chapter Review Questions
386(1)
Test Your Knowledge
387(2)
Dealing with HP-UX Processes
389(18)
Process Table
390(1)
Process States
391(2)
Running
392(1)
Sleeping
392(1)
Ready to Run Process
392(1)
Stopped
392(1)
Zombie
392(1)
Listing Processes
393(2)
Description of Fields in the Process Table
394(1)
Sending Signals to Processes
395(3)
The nohup Command
398(1)
Process Nice Values
398(4)
Listing Nice Priorities
399(2)
Changing the Nice Values of Running Processes
401(1)
Some Useful Commands
402(5)
The timex Command
402(1)
The trap Command
402(1)
Chapter Summary
403(1)
Chapter Review Questions
404(1)
Test Your Knowledge
405(2)
Printing on HP-UX
407(20)
Introduction to the Printing System
408(3)
Sending a Print Request
409(1)
Canceling a Print Request
410(1)
Modifying a Print Request
410(1)
Types of Printers
411(1)
Local Printers
411(1)
Remote Printers
412(1)
Network Printers
412(1)
Directory Hierarchy of the Printing System
412(2)
Adding a Printer
414(5)
Adding a Printer
414(1)
Setting a Printer as Default Destination
414(1)
Deleting a Printer
415(1)
Adding Printers Using SAM
415(4)
Managing Print Queues
419(3)
Starting and Stopping the Print Scheduler
419(1)
Moving Print Jobs
419(1)
Deleting Print Jobs
420(1)
Enabling and Disabling Printers
420(1)
Accepting and Rejecting Print Requests
420(1)
Current Printer Status
421(1)
Print Job Priorities
422(1)
Fence Priority
422(1)
Troubleshooting
422(5)
Chapter Summary
423(1)
Chapter Review Questions
424(1)
Test Your Knowledge
424(3)
Memory and Swap Space Management
427(12)
System Memory and Swap Space
429(2)
Daemons Used with the Swap System
429(2)
Types of Swap Space
431(1)
Device Swap Space
431(1)
File System Swap Space
431(1)
Primary Swap Space
431(1)
Secondary Swap Space
432(1)
Creating Swap Space
432(2)
Creating Swap Space Using the Command Line
432(1)
Creating Swap Space Using SAM
433(1)
Enabling Swap Space at System Startup
434(1)
Monitoring Swap Space
434(1)
Swap Space Priorities and Performance
435(4)
Chapter Summary
436(1)
Chapter Review Questions
436(1)
Test Your Knowledge
437(2)
System Backup and Recovery
439(22)
Types of Backup
440(2)
Full Backup
441(1)
Incremental Backup
441(1)
Recovering from Incremental Backup
442(1)
Methods of Backup and Restore
442(2)
Comparison of Backup Methods
443(1)
Using dd
444(1)
Using fbackup and frecover
444(5)
Creating a Backup
445(1)
Using Graph Files
446(1)
Creating an Incremental Backup
446(2)
Recovering Backed-up Data
448(1)
Using tar
449(2)
Creating a Backup with tar
449(1)
Restoring Data Using tar
450(1)
Using SAM to Backup and Restore Data
451(5)
Using Ignite-UX
456(5)
Creating a Recovery Tape
456(1)
Updating a Recovery Tape
457(1)
Chapter Summary
457(1)
Chapter Review Questions
458(1)
Test Your Knowledge
458(3)
Automating Jobs
461(12)
Introduction to cron
462(2)
The cron Daemon
462(1)
Granting Access to Users
463(1)
Log Files
464(1)
Automating Jobs Using the crontab Command
464(3)
Format of crontab Files
465(1)
Editing crontab Files
466(1)
Sample crontab File for the Root User
466(1)
Automating Jobs Using the at Command
467(6)
Submitting a Job
467(1)
Listing and Deleting at Jobs
468(1)
Allowing/Denying User Access
469(1)
Chapter Summary
470(1)
Chapter Review Questions
471(1)
Test Your Knowledge
471(2)
System Performance Monitoring
473(16)
Tools Used for Performance Monitoring
474(8)
Monitoring Memory Performance
475(1)
Monitoring Disk Performance
476(2)
Using top
478(2)
Using System Activity Reporter (sar)
480(2)
Using GlancePlus
482(7)
CPU Utilization
482(1)
Disk Utilization
483(1)
Memory Utilization
483(1)
Swap Utilization
483(1)
Processor List
483(3)
Chapter Summary
486(3)
PART THREE HP-UX Network Administration 489(204)
Basic Network Concepts
491(14)
Network Terminology
492(2)
Local and Wide Area Networks
492(1)
Protocol
493(1)
Host
493(1)
Physical Medium
493(1)
Network Interface Adapter
493(1)
Bandwidth
493(1)
Client and Server
494(1)
Route
494(1)
The OSI Model
494(11)
OSI Layers
494(4)
How Data Transfer Takes Place Among Layers
498(2)
Layered Network Model
500(1)
Chapter Summary
501(1)
Chapter Review Questions
502(1)
Test Your Knowledge
502(3)
Network Components and Topologies
505(18)
Network Topologies
506(3)
Bus Topology
506(1)
Star Topology
506(2)
Ring Topology
508(1)
Hybrid Networks
508(1)
Network Hardware Components
509(6)
Network Cables
509(1)
Network Interface Adapter
510(1)
Cable Connectors
510(1)
Transceiver
511(1)
Repeaters
511(1)
Hubs
511(1)
Bridges
512(1)
Switches
513(1)
Routers
514(1)
Gateway
514(1)
MAC Addresses
515(1)
Access Methods
515(1)
CSMA/CD
516(1)
Token Passing
516(1)
Ethernet and IEEE 802.3
516(2)
10BASE-2 Ethernet
517(1)
10BASE-5 Ethernet
517(1)
10BASE-T Ethernet
517(1)
100BASE-T Fast Ethernet
517(1)
100VG-AnyLAN Local Area Network
517(1)
Token Ring and IEEE 802.5
518(1)
FDDI
518(5)
Chapter Summary
519(1)
Chapter Review Questions
520(1)
Test Your Knowledge
521(2)
Introduction to the TCP/IP Protocol
523(20)
Introduction to TCP/IP
524(4)
TCP/IP Layers
525(1)
IP Address
525(1)
Network Address
526(1)
IP Address Classes
526(2)
Building an IP Network
528(8)
Assigning IP Addresses
530(1)
Netmasks and Subnetting
530(1)
IP Routes
531(2)
Address Resolution Protocol
533(1)
Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP)
534(1)
Internet Control Message Protocol
535(1)
TCP and UDP Protocols
536(2)
TCP Protocol
536(1)
UDP Protocol
536(1)
TCP Window Size
537(1)
Ports and Sockets
538(5)
Chapter Summary
538(2)
Chapter Review Questions
540(1)
Test Your Knowledge
540(3)
Configuring LAN Interface Adapters
543(26)
Configuring LAN Adapters
544(3)
LAN Adapter-Naming Convention
545(1)
Detecting LAN Adapters
545(2)
Configuring an IP Address to a LAN Adapter
547(3)
Enabling LAN Adapters at Boot Time Using the /etc/rc.config.d/netconf File
548(1)
Assigning Multiple IP Addresses to a Single LAN Adapter
549(1)
Updating the /etc/hosts File
550(1)
Adding Routes
550(3)
Creating a Route
552(1)
Deleting a Route
552(1)
Default Routes
552(1)
Using SAM to Configure a LAN Adapter
553(3)
Troubleshooting LAN Connectivity
556(13)
Analyzing Protocol Statistics with netstat
557(2)
Using the lanadmin Command
559(5)
Using the ndd Command
564(2)
Chapter Summary
566(1)
Chapter Review Questions
567(1)
Test Your Knowledge
567(2)
Configuring and Managing ARPA/Berkeley Services
569(20)
Introduction to Internet Services
570(8)
ARPA Services
571(3)
Berkeley Services
574(3)
Security of Commands Starting with "r"
577(1)
Starting Internet Services
578(7)
Starting a Service as a Daemon
579(1)
Starting a Service through inetd
579(6)
How a Connection Is Established
585(1)
Using SAM to Manage Network Services
585(4)
Chapter Summary
586(1)
Chapter Review Questions
587(1)
Test Your Knowledge
587(2)
Host Name Resolution and Domain Name Server
589(28)
Host Name to IP Address Mapping
591(1)
Multiple Host Names for a Single IP
591(1)
Multiple IP Addresses for a Single Host
592(1)
Name Resolution Methods
592(3)
The /etc/hosts File
592(1)
Network Information Service
593(1)
Domain Name Server
593(2)
Introduction to the Domain Name System
595(2)
Name Space
595(2)
Name Server
597(1)
Configuring the Primary DNS
597(7)
DNS Configuration Files
600(4)
Resource Records
604(1)
Updating Data Base Files on the Primary Server
604(1)
Configuring the Secondary DNS
604(2)
Updating Data Base Files on the Secondary Server
605(1)
Configuring the Caching DNS
606(1)
Configuring the DNS Client
606(4)
Configuring the Name Service Switch
607(1)
Configuring /etc/resolv.conf
607(1)
Testing with nslookup
608(2)
Using SAM to Configure DNS
610(7)
Chapter Summary
612(1)
Chapter Review Questions
613(1)
Test Your Knowledge
613(4)
Configuring and Managing NIS
617(22)
NIS Concepts
619(2)
NIS Domains
619(1)
NIS Maps
619(1)
NIS Roles
620(1)
Configuring NIS
621(8)
Setting Up an NIS Domain Name
621(1)
NIS Startup Files
622(1)
NIS Daemons
623(1)
Configuring the NIS Master Server
624(1)
Configuring an NIS Slave Server
625(1)
Configuring an NIS Client
626(1)
Name Service Switch
626(2)
Testing NIS Configuration
628(1)
Managing NIS
629(3)
Updating NIS Maps on the Master Server
629(1)
Updating NIS Maps on a Slave Server
630(1)
Changing a Password on a Client
631(1)
Using rpcinfo
631(1)
Controlling Access
632(2)
Using SAM to Configure NIS
634(5)
Chapter Summary
635(1)
Chapter Review Questions
636(1)
Test Your Knowledge
636(3)
Configuring and Managing the Network File System
639(20)
NFS Concepts
640(4)
Remote Mount Process
641(1)
NFS and RPC
641(2)
The portmap and rpcbind Daemons
643(1)
NFS Versions
643(1)
Configuring an NFS Server
644(3)
Creating the /etc/exports File
644(2)
Starting the Server Process at Boot Time
646(1)
Starting an NFS Server and Exporting Directories Manually
646(1)
Viewing Exported and Mounted File Systems
647(1)
Configuring an NFS Client
647(4)
Starting an NFS Client at Boot Time
648(1)
Creating Mount Points and Configuring /etc/fstab
648(1)
Mounting Remote File Systems
649(1)
Viewing Mounted File Systems
650(1)
Viewing Exported File Systems by a Server
650(1)
NFS Daemons
651(1)
Troubleshooting
652(7)
The rpcinfo Command
652(1)
Using the nfsstat Command
653(3)
Chapter Summary
656(1)
Chapter Review Questions
657(1)
Test Your Knowledge
657(2)
HP-UX Automounter
659(10)
Automounter Maps
661(3)
Master Map
661(1)
Direct Map
662(1)
Indirect Map
662(1)
Special Map
662(1)
Including Maps Within Other Maps
663(1)
Modifying Automounter Maps
663(1)
Configuring Automounter
664(5)
Chapter Summary
665(1)
Chapter Review Questions
666(1)
Test Your Knowledge
666(3)
Network Time Protocol
669(10)
Introduction to NTP
670(2)
NTP Time Sources
670(1)
Some Definitions
671(1)
Configuring the NTP Server
672(1)
Configuring a Server to Use a Radio Clock
673(1)
Configuring a Server to Use Another Server
673(1)
Configuring a Server to Use a Local Clock
673(1)
Configuring an NTP Client
673(1)
Configuring a Client to Use Server Polling
674(1)
Configuring a Client to Use Server Broadcast
674(1)
Using the ntpdate Command
674(1)
Using SAM to Configure NTP
674(5)
Chapter Summary
676(1)
Chapter Review Questions
676(1)
Test Your Knowledge
676(3)
System and Network Administration: Final Thoughts
679(14)
Routine Uses of a Network
681(2)
SD-UX Server
681(1)
Network Printing
681(1)
A Standard Environment for Users
681(1)
Time Synchronization
682(1)
Network File System
682(1)
Backup and Recovery
682(1)
Using syslogd Over a Network
683(2)
Network Performance Monitoring
685(5)
Routine Tasks
690(3)
Chapter Summary
692(1)
Appendix A: Chapter Review Answers 693
Appendix B: Test Your Knowledge Answers xxx
Appendix C: HP-UX Commands and Configuration Files xxx
Appendix D: Sample HP-UX Certification Exam xxx
Index xxx

Preface

Preface

I have tried to write a book that covers all HP-UX system and networking administration concepts. The book is divided into three parts. The first part consists of Chapters 1-11. It covers general UNIX concepts, user commands, and shell programming. The second part of the book covers HP-UX system administration and consists of Chapters 12-25. The third part consists of Chapters 26-36 and is dedicated to computer networking concepts and HP-UX network administration tasks. The book is divided into these three parts according to requirements of the HP-UX certification examination. This is also quite a logical way to present the material to a UNIX system administrator. At the end of each chapter, you will find chapter review questions to check your understanding of the material presented in the chapter. There are some sample test questions under "Test Your Knowledge," which will provide you an idea of which type of questions are going to be asked in the actual exam. I have tried to use a combination of simple and difficult questions in this part. Answers to the review questions are provided in Appendix A, and answers to the sample test questions are available in Appendix B.

While writing this book, I have tried to explain all system administration concepts in reasonable detail. Many examples are presented in each section of a chapter to help the user understand what happens when a particular command is executed. Commonly used command-line switches are also listed wherever appropriate. You will also find many screen shots showing what happens when you select a menu or press a button in the GUI windows. I have also tried to explain each system and network administration taskusing both command-line utilities and System Administration Manager (SAM). Most "old-fashioned" people would like to carry out many tasks using the command-line interface, which is also very important for passing the HP-UX certification examination.

The book is organized such that it progresses from simple-to-understand concepts to more-difficult and complicated ones. The same strategy is also implemented in each chapter. Figures, tables, and examples are presented wherever helpful to communicate the concept. The first few chapters contain more examples than the later ones to give a user a good start.

Another consideration in the organization of the book is logical relevance and order of the chapters. If an idea or concept depends on another concept, it is placed later in the book.

This book is intended to be the most comprehensive book on HP-UX. It not only covers the HP-UX certification exam, but it also serves as a reference book for even the most experienced HP-UX system administrators. The first part is designed with the most basic concepts so that anybody who is new to HP-UX can get the full benefit. The next two parts cover more-complicated system and network administration tasks. Both novice and experienced users will find interesting things here.

Part 1: Fundamentals of UNIX Systems

The first part is an introduction to the UNIX system. This is a more-general UNIX part and consists of login and logout procedure, file and directory manipulation, file editing, an introduction to the POSIX shell, and file security/permissions. This part shows the concepts of users and groups, which are common to all UNIX systems. UNIX commands related to all these topics are presented and the more commonly used options of these commands are discussed. This part also throws light on standard input/output and I/O redirection. Chapters 10 and 11 introduce shell programming concepts. Here you will find a number of shell programs, up to elaborate shell variables and flow control structures.

Part 2: HP-UX System Administration

The second part is the core HP-UX system administration part of the book. It fully covers all issues from the installation of HP-UX to managing devices, security, and system performance. The part starts with an introduction to System Administration Manager (SAM), which is a comprehensive HP-UX tool meant for system administration. Installation of HP-UX on a server or workstation is presented next. After that, you will gradually progress from basic to more-complex system configuration tasks, building a kernel, managing devices, adding/removing users, and concepts of the HP-UX file system.

Part 3: HP-UX Network Administration

The third part covers HP-UX network administration. It also contains general networking concepts such as the ISO-OSI reference model and TCP/IP networking. One chapter is dedicated to ARPA/Berkeley services. Then NFS, NIS, DNS, and NTP are covered.

How to Register for the HP-UX Certification Examination

You can register for the examination by calling Sylvan Prometric at 1-800-755-EXAM or directly at Website. You can also visit an authorized Sylvan Prometric Testing Center to get more information. A list of authorized testing centers is available at. More information is available on the HP Education Website.

Strategies for Taking the Test

You should take a practice test to estimate the time needed to answer all questions. Stay relaxed and have a good night's sleep before the test day. Keep the following things in mind for a successful examination:

  • Reach the testing center at least 15 minutes before the scheduled starting time. You have to sign a few papers and show identification before you start the test.
  • Have with you at least two pieces of personal identification: One of these must contain your photograph. For example, valid identification documents might be your driver's license and a credit card.
  • You don't need to carry any paper or pencils with you.
  • Carefully read each question before answering it.
  • Try to answer the easy questions first. If a question is taking a long time, just mark it and move to the next question. You are allowed to go back to review your answers and answer any leftover questions. The first target should be to go through all the questions from start to finish.
  • When selecting an answer, try to rule out some of the options. This will help you select the right answer.
  • While reviewing your answers, try to read the question very carefully: You may have chosen a wrong answer because you have misunderstood the question.

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