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The hundredth man
     

The hundredth man

3.6 19
by Jack Kerley
 

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Product Details

BN ID:
2940017480236
Publisher:
New York : Dutton
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
499 KB

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Hundredth Man 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿The Hundredth Man¿ is a well-written murder mystery novel by a first-time author. Yes, it is a ¿cops and robbers¿ type of story but the twists and turns make it more than the ordinary type of writing. Harry Nautilus and Carson Ryder are partners for the PSIT Unit Mobile. PSIT is the Psychopathological and Sociopathological Investigative Team which is a newly formed unit to handle the mindless violence of Mobile. Bodies are turning up without their heads. Each body has been written on in what is thought to be nonsensical words. It is up to Harry and Carson to figure out what is going on. There is a new coroner¿s assistant, with a dark secret, who has Carson¿s attention. She seems to be completely dedicated to her work and puts Carson in his place when he tries to make small talk. Then add Terrence Squill to the mix. He is Chief of Investigative Services and trying to climb the ladder to the next higher position. He doesn¿t like Carson because of a previous crime Carson solved which brought him into the media notice rather than Squill. Carson has a family secret that he doesn¿t want anyone in the department to know about. It isn¿t an illegal secret, just one that Carson has trouble handling. While trying to solve the murders, this secret keeps getting in the way but in the end, helps him to solve the murders. Jack Kerley describes the bars and bays of Mobile with great accuracy making you feel like you are actually in these areas. He writes with a vocabulary that makes these characters come alive in the reader¿s mind. The easy flow of his story was a pleasure to read and follow. I never had to go back to reread a section because I had missed some obtuse part ¿ there just weren¿t any. Yet, there were twists and turns you didn¿t expect which kept me from putting the book down. The cast of characters were real and believable. I hope to see many more books from this new author. He writes one of my favorite genres ¿ murder mysteries. If you like to read new authors, be sure to pick up ¿The Hundredth Man¿.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would like Kerley & James Patterson to team up and write the next one. Please let Dick Hill talk it through, his delivery is fantastic. This is a take off from Silence of the Lambs where the insane one (locked up and not a major charactor) helps his cop-brother solve horrible crimes...however, the cop-brother must pay a price after each meeting with the insane one. I would read/listen to another book by Kerley. Kit
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WHAT CAME UP.WAS NOT THE BOOK LISTED. :-( :-(
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When I opened the book, it is not the book labeled. Someone please fix!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was a pretty good read and it screams of franchise. Its a little bit of Alex Cross (cop whos the best but shunned by some of his superiors) and Kay Scarpetta (the medical examiner angle) but what got me the most was the similarities of Silence of the Lambs. Using a madman in prison to help solve the mystery. Kerley's a hack who see what works and combines the elements. But again, a good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A thriller that surprised me at the end and left me wishing this weren't Kerley's first book so I could read some more. Kerley's characters are memorable and make me glad I don't live near Mobile. All excellent books not only deliver a great story they pose questions for the reader to consider. Carson Ryder allows us to hold a mirror and wonder what drives us and what extremes we would endure for truth, justice or the American way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kerley's book is such a rock solid entry in the crime thriller genre that I was surprised to learn this was his first book; it reads like the work of a seasoned, oft-published professional. His descriptions are a delight to read--no time-worn cliches from Kerley--and the humor nicely counterbalances the horrific murders which are perpetrated by a serial murderer. In addition to interesting characters (the police partnership of a seasoned veteran and a younger, still a bit naive rookie are given a fresh perspective by Kerley) his plotting keeps the pace hurtling so that the book is a quick read that leaves you frankly wanting more. Did I guess who the killer was? Nope, not even close and that wins extra points because too many thrillers offer predictable plots and easy-to-guess solutions. I look forward to reading more of Kerley's work; I'm guessing he's going to be around for a long, long time. I can recommend A Hundredth Man to those who enjoy reading books by James Patterson, Patrica Cornwell, Michael Connolly, Janet Evanovich and Jonathan Kellerman.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Thrillers about serial killers may be a dime a dozen but authors and readers such as the two represented here certainly are not. Debut novelist Kerley comes out kicking with a fast paced intricately plotted story that goes full throttle from start to finish. What more can one say about a narrator as accomplished as Dick Hill? He's been dubbed one of the industry's Golden voices, and took top honors for his reading of 'Amazing Grace' in 1995. Just when you think he couldn't possible get any better - he does. He thoroughly hooks listeners by segueing seamlessly between the voice of protagonist Carson Ryder and the thoughts of a psychotic serial killer. Young and inexperienced detective Carson Ryder is paired with crusty veteran Harry Nautilus when corpses begin turning up with ghoulish messages on their bodies and their heads missing. These two are caught in the middle, torn by their duty to protect and the messy department politics which seem to be unavoidable. Romantic interest is intriguing pathologist Dr. A.A. Divinely who oversees the autopsies. Of course, Ryder is smitten but she has some skeletons in her closet that preoccupy her. Speaking of skeletons in closets, Ryder's brother is a convicted killer, found guilty of committing crimes very similar to the ones terrifying Mobile, Alabama. Who better to help him track a psychopath than another? It appears that someone with ties to Ryder and Nautilus is the killer. But, who and why? - Gail Cooke
Guest More than 1 year ago
Carson Ryder and Harry Nautilus, two sharp street detectives, comprise the newly formed, Mobile, Alabama Psychological and Sociopathological Investigative team in Jack Kerley¿s astounding debut novel, ¿The Hundredth Man.¿ Nautilus is the wizened veteran on the ¿psycho-crimes¿ pair. When two headless corpses, inked with puzzling and bizarre messages turn up, the chase is on. The beheadings are clean and precise, indicating a pro. The crimes are at once reprehensible as well as cool, calm and deliberate. Carson and Harry¿s investigation is undermined by the police department political circus and the secrets that abound in the Medical Examiner¿s office. In fact, most everyone has a secret and a past to protect. The back-stories make for fascinating characters thrown together with startling results. The action is fast paced, moving between crime scenes to the autopsies in the morgue¿with sidebars where Harry and Carson outwit the police brass and the perp. Snappy dialogue and intriguing characters help propel the unpredictable plot. It is a spectacular ride---a journey so gripping, it is easy to overlook the way over-the-top finale. A captivating debut¿I look forward to more from Jack Kerley.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A striking first novel. Kerley shows potential of becoming a pre-eminent thriller writer on the strength of this early work. The book commences with a scene in an autopsy where a corpse's rectum contains a bomb, which destroys the hand of the examiner. Visually very compelling. After which, the rest of the novel is told in the first person narrative of the hero, detective Ryder. But perhaps Kerley is overstraining. He has put together a florid plot, adding graphic element upon element. Like Ryder having a brother in an asylum, because he murdered several people. Not content with this colourful item, Kerley has the brother provide clues, in a manner of speaking, throughout the plot. Stretches credulity. Also, the statutory love interest is an alcoholic surgeon that Ryder relatively effortlessly rescues from her affliction. But at least Ryder's character has some depth. At times, he philosophises 'deep'. If Kerley refines his trade, Ryder may be as memourable as Michael Connolly's Harry Bosch.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was his first autopsy as a pathologist for the mobile Alabama police department and it went well until he found an object in the victim¿s anus that exploded and destroyed his hand. The head pathologist hires Dr. Ava Davenelle as his replacement and Detective Carson Ryder who is observing the autopsy is almost immediately smitten. The case Carson is working on involves a victim with his head surgically removed from his body in almost perfect condition except for the knife wounds that that the killer inflicted............................. Ava finds writings on the public area of the body and Carson thinks they are dealing with a sociopath personality. A special unit was formed to deal with killers like that with Carson and his partner heading up the unit but police politics push them into a lesser role. Two more decapitated victims are found, also with bizarre writing on their torso. Carson finally takes Ava on a date but she passes out from to much alcohol. He uses his connections to help her fight the disease while looking for a killer who will strike again and this time the victim could be someone he knows................................ Jack Kerley¿s debut novel is an exciting serial killer thriller that is on a par with the likes of Thomas Harris and Patricia Cornwell. The protagonist comes from a dysfunctional background and has his own demons to fight but that doesn¿t stop him from being an expert detective with an intuitive sense that helps him solve cases. Readers will enjoy the expert pacing, brilliant characterizations and believable action scenes of THE HUNDREDTH MAN.............................. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Where is the story?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This seems to be some sort of history book. No stars for a book that is not the mystery I hoped to read. But it looks like I have to give at least one star to post this warning
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a ripoff by Barnes/Noble purchase library. They led everyone to believe this was a novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dgtgfkhugh
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What is the story, not by the posted author!