I Curse the River of Time

I Curse the River of Time

by Per Petterson
3.1 19

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I Curse the River of Time 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
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SAHARATEA More than 1 year ago
I Curse the River of Time is Per Petterson's newest title, and it feels different from his previous novels. For one thing, there is a different feel to the words, almost a jagged and sharp edge to the prose. While Out Stealing Horses was almost dreamlike in its beauty and simplicity, this has more of an abrupt edge to it. That became apparent to me in reading portions of it aloud (a cranky baby was resisting sleep) and the words felt chunky and awkward, the sentences long and meandering. Given the subject matter, the complicated relationship of a son with his mother, I think this simply underlines just how talented a writer Petterson is. The style fits the story. The novel begins with the illness of Arvid Jansen's mother, and her quick journey away from home to absorb her news. Arvid quickly follows. The telling is interspersed with flashbacks of Arvid's life, from incidents in childhood to more recent times with his impending divorce. His mother is portrayed as a distant but loving individual, with a strong personality and an aloofness towards Arvid that is never formally explained. It is very much centered on Arvid and his inner feelings as he perceives her, rather than her personal motivations. Much of what makes this novel fascinating is by what isn't said: several significant events happen (a family death, her illness itself) that are not explored at all. Rather Petterson focuses on how those events affect Arvid and his mother. If he were to have explained every detail of those events a reader would likely be struck more by the tragedy and its details rather than by what Petterson is getting at, the more subtle change in relationships. It's really very clever to read it that way. It's almost as if those very dramatic events are secondary to who these people really are. As a child, Arvid didn't fit in with his family, despite his parent's assurances of how much he was 'wanted' by them, and valued. On a dismal occasion when a stranger took him to be an outsider from his family, "But what I found out that summer.was that I could swallow whatever hit me and let it sink as if nothing had happened. So I pretended to play a game that meant nothing to me now, I made all the right movements, and then it looked as if what I was doing had a purpose, but it did not." There are allusions made to what might cause him to feel this way, and Petterson lets us wonder. As in life, he seems to want to tell us, there are no easy answers. I have some personal suspicions why this may be, but I don't want to spoil the mystery for anyone else (and I could easily be wrong). read more at http://www.theblacksheepdances.blogspot.com