I See You Everywhere

I See You Everywhere

by Julia Glass
2.7 33

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Overview

I See You Everywhere by Julia Glass

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

A Christian Science Monitor Best Book of the Year

Julia Glass, the bestselling, National Book Award-winning author of Three Junes, returns with a tender, riveting book of two sisters and their complicated relationship.

Louisa Jardine is the older one, the conscientious student, precise and careful: the one who yearns for a good marriage, an artistic career, a family. Clem, the archetypal youngest, is the rebel: committed to her work saving animals, but not to the men who fall for her. In this vivid, heartrending story of what we can and cannot do for those we love, the sisters grow closer as they move further apart. All told with sensual detail and deft characterization, I See You Everywhere is a candid story of life and death, companionship and sorrow, and the nature of sisterhood itself.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780375422751
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/14/2008
Pages: 304
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Julia Glass is the author of Three Junes, which won the National Book Award for Fiction, and The Whole World Over. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Her short fiction has won several prizes, including the Tobias Wolff Award and the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society Medal for the Best Novella. She lives with her family in Massachusetts.

Hometown:

New York, New York

Date of Birth:

March 23, 1956

Place of Birth:

Boston, Massachusetts

Education:

B.A., Yale College, 1978; Scholar of the House in Art, Summa Cum Laude, 1978

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I See You Everywhere 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved Julia Glass's first novel, Three Junes, and was really looking forward to reading another novel by her. This one is very disappointing. There doesn't seem to be a point to it, and I feel I'm taking up time unnecessarily by reading it. I'd pass this one up for something else.
Kaly More than 1 year ago
The love of a sister is puzzling. Somewhere between the boundaries of unconditional love, there is an abundance of jealousy, resentment, competition, and sometimes hatred. In Julia Glass's novel I See You Everywhere, she attempts to harness and explain the dynamics of this very relationship. Glass presents us with the lives of two sisters, Louisa and Clem. Although both stem from the same beginnings, blood seems to be the only thing these women share. The contrast is made starkly in the beginning chapters. Readers are puzzled as how Lou, a cautious bibliophile who loves art and literature and Clem, the wild child lover of everything wild and dangerous could be twined together at all. However, as the pages turn and readers find themselves stepping into the lives of Louisa and Clem we find that these sisters are much more analogous than could ever be previously comprehended. I was absolutely captivated by the writing of Julia Glass. One of the aspects that made this novel so reader-friendly was the format it was written in. I See You Everywhere is in sporadic chronological order written from alternating perspectives of the two sisters. This format is common in fiction works, but Glass truly utilizes the effect this writing scheme is supposed to project. The reader is forced to search the contrary sister's life for hints of the corresponding sister's life. Also, large chronological gaps provide injections of mystery and repel even the idea of the story dragging. Another approach to Glass's writing revels her mastery of human beings and their relationships. When we first meet Lou and Clem, they are in their early twenties and returning home to Vermont. Lou seems lost and spiteful to life, especially to her sister. She is an East Coast girl stuck in California after a college romance fizzled. Clem is a vivacious thrill-seeker with itch to save the world and all the animals who inhabit it. She has men at her disposal and is the clear favorite to her animal-loving mother. It almost seems like the readers are predisposed to love Clem and wonder why Lou can't get over her childish jealousies. The girls evolve into women and the once endearing traits of Clem betray her. Adventuresome turns into reckless and selfish. When I finished I See You Everywhere, I was shocked at how much my viewpoint of the women changed over the course of the writing without me even realizing it. To me, that is a mark of a truly great book. Being a sister myself, I was shocked at just how realistically Glass portrays sisterhood. When you pick up I See You Everywhere (and I recommend you do), you are not selecting easily dismissible sisterhood fluff. Glass stays true to life, undesirable traits we all possess, and the fact that we need each other more than we could ever realize.
LoraineD More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. The author had me from the very first page and held me to the last. This is a story of two sisters, one a wild, seductive adventurer the other a survivor. Written in simple, elegant prose the author takes us through a quarter of a century of their lives beginning with sibling rivalry and ending with heart-breaking sibling love and loss. The beauty and themes of this book, love, life, death, family, and devotion to nature haunted me for days after I put it down. I SEE YOU EVERYWHERE is a book I will read and reread and remember all my life.
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Interlude More than 1 year ago
I kept waiting for something to happen... I always finish a book. I read two other books while trying to get through this one. I'm giving the book away.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Tiger-gal More than 1 year ago
I tried to get into this book, but the more I read, the less I related to the two sisters telling their stories. I kept waiting for something to happen, and by the time a tragedy struck, I didn't care. There was too much detail written on insignificant events and not enough on what I wanted to know about (Clem's mental health, Louisa's divorce, their relationships with their parents).
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Mommy_Wife_Me More than 1 year ago
This book is very depressing, It made me have the blues for a couple of days. Towards the end it gets a lil boring ,like who cares.Ending was really bad but I did have some favorite parts but all in all not something I would recommend. If you want to try it, loan it from the library, that's what i did
emilyp More than 1 year ago
I was excited about this book when I bought it, but very disappointed once I read it. The ending was terrible! I thought I would pass this book around to all my friends with sisters, but I wouldn't recommend it to any of them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. It's a soft, easy read. It provides a glimpse into the lives of two sisters that are very different, yet similar. It's not a thriller, it's more like coming home.
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ladychatterly More than 1 year ago
The story of two sisters and their rivalry, growing apart, coming together, nothing out of the ordinary which could have saved this novel. A pool side or beach read at best; although with the flipping back and forth through the years it is sometimes hard to figure out whether you're in the past or present time frame.
BibliophileMB More than 1 year ago
I am one of those readers who ALWAYS finishes a book --- always hoping that it is going to get better as I read along. This is one of the few books I have ever just given up on. I couldn't take anymore. It all seemed pointless --- didn't seem to be going ANYWHERE!
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