I Was Amelia Earhart

I Was Amelia Earhart

by Jane Mendelsohn
3.9 10

Paperback(Reprinted Edition)

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Overview

I Was Amelia Earhart by Jane Mendelsohn

In this brilliantly imagined novel, Amelia Earhart tells us what happened after she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared off the coast of New Guinea one glorious, windy day in 1937. And she tells us about herself.

There is her love affair with flying ("The sky is flesh") . . . .

There are her memories of the past: her childhood desire to become a heroine ("Heroines did what they wanted") . . . her marriage to G.P. Putnam, who promoted her to fame, but was willing to gamble her life so that the book she was writing about her round-the-world flight would sell out before Christmas.

There is the flight itself — day after magnificent or perilous or exhilarating or terrifying day ("Noonan once said any fool could have seen I was risking my life but not living it").

And there is, miraculously, an island ("We named it Heaven, as a kind of joke").

And, most important, there is Noonan . . .

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780679776369
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/28/1997
Series: Vintage Contemporaries Series
Edition description: Reprinted Edition
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 208,629
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Jane Mendelsohn was born in New York City, July 4, 1965. She was graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Yale University in 1987, and attended Yale Law School for one year before beginning a career as a writer/journalist.

In 1992, Ms. Mendelsohn spotted an article in The New York Times about the discovery of a piece of a plane believed to have been Amelia Earhart's. The article mentioned that Earhart traveled with a navigator, Fred Noonan, who was with her on her last flight. Intrigued by the dramatic possibilities of two people flying around the world together, crashing, and perhaps surviving, she began researching Earhart's life and disappearance. Shortly after, Ms. Mendelsohn began sketching out a book based on her findings. The first version was a much longer book, told entirely in the third person. "Once I finished it," Ms. Mendelsohn says, "I realized that I had only just figured out the story. Now that I knew what had happened, I had to tell it in Earhart's, and my, voice." The result is I Was Amelia Earhart.

Harper's Bazaar hails I Was Amelia Earhart as "an immediately addicting book, as telegraphic as those of Margaret Duras, and as charged with longing....not to be missed." The New York Times writes, "Ms. Mendelsohn has chosen to use the bare-boned outlines of the aviator's life as an armature for a poetic meditation on freedom and love and flight. I Was Amelia Earhart, like Gabriel Garcia Marquez's General in His Labyrinth, invokes the spirit of a mythic personage, while standing on its own as a powerfully imagined work of fiction." I Was Amelia Earhart is Ms. Mendelsohn's first book and novel.

Ms. Mendelsohn's reviews have appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Village Voice, The Guardian, The London Review of Books, and Yale Review. She has worked as an assistant to the literary editor at The Village Voice and as a tutor at Yale University. At the moment, Ms. Mendelsohn is writing a horror film. She is also sketching out details for her next novel.

Ms. Mendelsohn is married and lives in New York with her husband, filmmaker Nick Davis.

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I Was Amelia Earhart 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While the prose was lovely, I feel that the author spent too much time in writing poetic senntences rather than putting a coherent story together. Sommetimes revisioning history can be facinating, but here it falls flat. I had to make myself finish this book, felt liike wading through mud. Mercifully the book was very short (99 pages) so while i feel i wasted too much money on it, i did not waste too much time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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JennGrrl More than 1 year ago
This book is a great concept. This book is a work of fiction. It takes what is known about a real event, and then it goes beyond the event and takes a fictional look at what might have happened afterward, or rather creates an entire story about what happens afterward. The book begins with Amelia Earhart getting ready to fly around the world. We're then with Amelia and her navigator when their plane goes down. It's there that the fiction really begins. Amelia and her navigator get stuck on an island, they're guessing somewhere on an Asian island, though they really don't know where they are. It's sort of Blue Lagoonish or Robinson Crusoeish after that. They figure out how to survive on the island, and they try to decide what they're going to do when no one seems to be coming to rescue them. It was interesting, though not usually my sort of fiction. It was an easy read, though. I finished it within a couple of hours.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If Amelia fell in love with Fred, she was brain dead! I started writing my own novel on the Women's Air Race three years ago. It's called Amelia's Voice. In it the reader goes down with the plane all right, but not on an island! And what about the women who made Amealia...Amelia. Women like Pancho Barnes, Louise Thaden, and Phoebe Omlie. What about the Women's Air Race, the celebs at the race, the dance afterwards in Ohio, the music, the age in which she flew. All that is lost on an island she never landed on! Good God is she had she would have drowned Fred!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Exceptional piece of work,particularly for a debut novel. I read Mendelsohn's 'Innocence' and found it quirky yet wonderfully written with a shocking twist, and that prompted me to pick up 'I was Amelia Earhart' and it was quite a good choice. I never wished once to put this book down, her writing style is unlike any other I've read, she elicits such beautiful words and images, spellbounding the reader and forcing them into her lyrical web.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a shimmering dream of a book, lyrical and romantic (in both senses of that word.) I listened to it on tape and decided I wanted to read it on the page. I recommended it to the rather diverse members of my family, all of whom greatly enjoyed it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gracious and breathtaking, this book is one of the finest I've read. It is thrilling and beautiful, provoking its reader to thought and emotion. The eloquently written lines flow like poetry. I've read this book many times and it continues to inspire me to live and love deeply.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I Was Amelia Earhart is a story filled with great lines, ideas, and philosophies. It's not just a theory about the disappearance of Amelia Earhart, it's a thought about life.