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If You Were an Inch or a Centimeter
     

If You Were an Inch or a Centimeter

by Marcie Aboff, Sarah Dillard (Illustrator)
 

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If you were an inch or a centimeter, you would be the height, width, or length of things. You could be a new snowfall, a TV set, or a short haircut. What else could you be if you were an inch or a centimeter?

Overview

If you were an inch or a centimeter, you would be the height, width, or length of things. You could be a new snowfall, a TV set, or a short haircut. What else could you be if you were an inch or a centimeter?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jane Singleton Paul
The concepts of inches and centimeters as units of linear measurement are delightfully explained and illustrated in this nonfiction book, part of the series "Math Fun." Length measurement is simply yet cleverly made intelligible to young readers through examples such as a bunny measuring snow depth, a doctor determining a giraffe's height or a snake's stretch, and a bunny on the golf course establishing the length that separates its ball from the cup. Dogs build their dream house using rulers; squirrels make new clothes by measuring material with a meter stick, and elated ducks waddle in the rain, while the duck forecaster gleefully announces two inches of rainfall. A hairy ape at the barber shop gets more cut that he requests; kitties on the baseball diamond miss a homerun by four inches, and dogs playing soccer score a goal by ten centimeters, while a father and daughter plant a vegetable garden, taking care to keep the seeds a proper distance apart. In each instance, measurement is taught using the most ordinary and everyday happenings, easily identifiable by children, whatever their level of previous knowledge. Dillard's illustrations are especially engaging. One potentially confusing detail is when the text speaks of the width of a television set, yet the illustration shows the diagonal length. Although this is the manner in which television screen size is usually given, it could confuse young readers. Introducing terms such as ruler, yardstick, and estimate has great merit, as does introducing the metric system that is, after all, used by the majority of the world's population! The practical guide of using one's thumb—a different scale for child or adult—is helpful inintroducing the concept of linear measurement for first or second graders. Another practical aspect is the last page, where readers find a glossary, an index, a list of related books and websites, and a list of all the books in the "Math Fun" series. Reviewer: Jane Singleton Paul

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781404851986
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Series:
Math Fun Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
700L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Marcie Aboff is the author of picture books, early readers, chapter books, and magazine stories. She also used to work as a feature writer for a daily newspaper in Escondido, California, and as a catalog copywriter for an advertising firm in New York City. She’s written more than 20 titles for Picture Window Books. Marcie loves visiting schools to talk to students about being an author, as well as helping them develop their own writing potential. When she’s not writing or visiting schools, Marcie likes to play tennis, listen to music, see really good movies, travel, and eat as much chocolate as she can. Marcie resides in Edison, New Jersey, with her two sons and one daughter. Their cat, Sneakers, also resides in the home, although he sometimes is under the impression he is the sole proprietor. Please visit Marcie’s website (www.marcieaboff.com) to learn more about her books.

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